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Force plate monitoring of human hemodynamics.

Kríz J, Seba P - Nonlinear Biomed Phys (2008)

Bottom Line: Noninvasive recording of movements caused by the heartbeat and the blood circulation is known as ballistocardiography.Several studies have shown the capability of a force plate to detect cardiac activity in the human body.The results are compared with the data obtained invasively during a cardiac catheterization.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Hradec Králové, Rokitanského 62, CZ - 500 03 Hradec Králové, Czech Republic. seba@fzu.cz.

ABSTRACT

Background: Noninvasive recording of movements caused by the heartbeat and the blood circulation is known as ballistocardiography. Several studies have shown the capability of a force plate to detect cardiac activity in the human body. The aim of this paper is to present a new method based on differential geometry of curves to handle multivariate time series obtained by ballistocardiographic force plate measurements.

Results: We show that the recoils of the body caused by cardiac motion and blood circulation provide a noninvasive method of displaying the motions of the heart muscle and the propagation of the pulse wave along the aorta and its branches. The results are compared with the data obtained invasively during a cardiac catheterization. We show that the described noninvasive method is able to determine the moment of a particular heart movement or the time when the pulse wave reaches certain morphological structure.

Conclusions: Monitoring of heart movements and pulse wave propagation may be used e.g. to estimate the aortic pulse wave velocity, which is widely accepted as an index of aortic stiffness with the application of predicting risk of heart disease in individuals. More extended analysis of the method is however needed to assess its possible clinical application.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Typical example of the first averaged curvature during the pulse wave propagation. The first averaged curvature of the force plate signal is compared with times when the pulse wave reaches certain morphological structures (labeled vertical lines). The labels represent: 1 – aortal root; 2 – truncus brachiocephalicus; 3-top of the aortal arch; 4 – below the diaphragm; 5 – origin of renal arteries; 6 – the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta to the common iliac arteries; 7 – junction of the external iliac artery and femoral artery. The time counting starts at the maximum of the ECG R wave. The inset displays the first (crosses), second (squares) and third (circles) averaged curvatures referring to a marked time interval.
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Figure 1: Typical example of the first averaged curvature during the pulse wave propagation. The first averaged curvature of the force plate signal is compared with times when the pulse wave reaches certain morphological structures (labeled vertical lines). The labels represent: 1 – aortal root; 2 – truncus brachiocephalicus; 3-top of the aortal arch; 4 – below the diaphragm; 5 – origin of renal arteries; 6 – the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta to the common iliac arteries; 7 – junction of the external iliac artery and femoral artery. The time counting starts at the maximum of the ECG R wave. The inset displays the first (crosses), second (squares) and third (circles) averaged curvatures referring to a marked time interval.

Mentions: The results have been encouraging. Some of the pronounced peaks observed in the averaged curvatures appear exactly at times when the pulse wave reaches anatomically distinguished positions and is scattered. Typical results are plotted on Figure 1.


Force plate monitoring of human hemodynamics.

Kríz J, Seba P - Nonlinear Biomed Phys (2008)

Typical example of the first averaged curvature during the pulse wave propagation. The first averaged curvature of the force plate signal is compared with times when the pulse wave reaches certain morphological structures (labeled vertical lines). The labels represent: 1 – aortal root; 2 – truncus brachiocephalicus; 3-top of the aortal arch; 4 – below the diaphragm; 5 – origin of renal arteries; 6 – the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta to the common iliac arteries; 7 – junction of the external iliac artery and femoral artery. The time counting starts at the maximum of the ECG R wave. The inset displays the first (crosses), second (squares) and third (circles) averaged curvatures referring to a marked time interval.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2315646&req=5

Figure 1: Typical example of the first averaged curvature during the pulse wave propagation. The first averaged curvature of the force plate signal is compared with times when the pulse wave reaches certain morphological structures (labeled vertical lines). The labels represent: 1 – aortal root; 2 – truncus brachiocephalicus; 3-top of the aortal arch; 4 – below the diaphragm; 5 – origin of renal arteries; 6 – the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta to the common iliac arteries; 7 – junction of the external iliac artery and femoral artery. The time counting starts at the maximum of the ECG R wave. The inset displays the first (crosses), second (squares) and third (circles) averaged curvatures referring to a marked time interval.
Mentions: The results have been encouraging. Some of the pronounced peaks observed in the averaged curvatures appear exactly at times when the pulse wave reaches anatomically distinguished positions and is scattered. Typical results are plotted on Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Noninvasive recording of movements caused by the heartbeat and the blood circulation is known as ballistocardiography.Several studies have shown the capability of a force plate to detect cardiac activity in the human body.The results are compared with the data obtained invasively during a cardiac catheterization.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Hradec Králové, Rokitanského 62, CZ - 500 03 Hradec Králové, Czech Republic. seba@fzu.cz.

ABSTRACT

Background: Noninvasive recording of movements caused by the heartbeat and the blood circulation is known as ballistocardiography. Several studies have shown the capability of a force plate to detect cardiac activity in the human body. The aim of this paper is to present a new method based on differential geometry of curves to handle multivariate time series obtained by ballistocardiographic force plate measurements.

Results: We show that the recoils of the body caused by cardiac motion and blood circulation provide a noninvasive method of displaying the motions of the heart muscle and the propagation of the pulse wave along the aorta and its branches. The results are compared with the data obtained invasively during a cardiac catheterization. We show that the described noninvasive method is able to determine the moment of a particular heart movement or the time when the pulse wave reaches certain morphological structure.

Conclusions: Monitoring of heart movements and pulse wave propagation may be used e.g. to estimate the aortic pulse wave velocity, which is widely accepted as an index of aortic stiffness with the application of predicting risk of heart disease in individuals. More extended analysis of the method is however needed to assess its possible clinical application.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus