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The Cuyahoga is still burning.

Silbergeld EK, Graham JP - Environ. Health Perspect. (2008)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

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The Cuyahoga River doesn’t catch on fire any more, but somewhere along the way, we forgot something important about the environment and health... The fish are back, and the people are back—fishing, swimming, and boating in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, just as they are in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor (Baltimore, MD), the New York Bight, and many other rivers and lakes once devoid of aquatic life and human laughter... However, they are not safe... In the Cuyahoga, the found Salmonella, Clostridium, enteroviruses, hepatitis A virus, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia... These are among the most common causes of infectious disease in the United States... In the rivers and streams flowing through Baltimore to the Inner Harbor of the Chesapeake Bay, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have found the same dangerous brew of disease-causing organisms... We carried out a study of urban anglers—people who fish in the urban watershed of Baltimore—and reported that, although some fish have elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls or mercury, anglers are at immediate risk of infection by Cryptosporidium merely by handling caught fish and crabs... Agriculture is also a significant source of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, which are associated with the use of antibiotics as feed additives for the billions of chickens, swine, and cattle produced annually in the United States... Unfortunately, regulatory attention is intermittent; the U.S. EPA’s most recent regulations on controlling animal wastes do not include pathogens, and a recent congressional authorization for grants to municipalities and states is limited to controlling storm-water–related overflows from wastewater treatment plants... Pathogens are not even included in the fish advisories used by states, under the, to protect the health of recreational anglers... In fact, the way pathogen contamination is measured in surface waters has not been updated since the 1960s, even though we know that testing for so-called coliform bacteria provides little reliable information on viruses or microparasites, which are much more dangerous pathogens... These are environmental health issues of the highest priority... The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has a critical role in improving our knowledge on the role of the environment in the emergence and dispersion of infectious pathogens and human disease, including ecologic cycling of pathogens, the regulation of reservoirs of antimicrobial resistance, and the persistence of pathogens in soils and other media.

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Ellen K. Silbergeld
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f1-ehp0116-a00150: Ellen K. Silbergeld


The Cuyahoga is still burning.

Silbergeld EK, Graham JP - Environ. Health Perspect. (2008)

Ellen K. Silbergeld
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2290999&req=5

f1-ehp0116-a00150: Ellen K. Silbergeld

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The Cuyahoga River doesn’t catch on fire any more, but somewhere along the way, we forgot something important about the environment and health... The fish are back, and the people are back—fishing, swimming, and boating in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, just as they are in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor (Baltimore, MD), the New York Bight, and many other rivers and lakes once devoid of aquatic life and human laughter... However, they are not safe... In the Cuyahoga, the found Salmonella, Clostridium, enteroviruses, hepatitis A virus, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia... These are among the most common causes of infectious disease in the United States... In the rivers and streams flowing through Baltimore to the Inner Harbor of the Chesapeake Bay, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have found the same dangerous brew of disease-causing organisms... We carried out a study of urban anglers—people who fish in the urban watershed of Baltimore—and reported that, although some fish have elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls or mercury, anglers are at immediate risk of infection by Cryptosporidium merely by handling caught fish and crabs... Agriculture is also a significant source of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, which are associated with the use of antibiotics as feed additives for the billions of chickens, swine, and cattle produced annually in the United States... Unfortunately, regulatory attention is intermittent; the U.S. EPA’s most recent regulations on controlling animal wastes do not include pathogens, and a recent congressional authorization for grants to municipalities and states is limited to controlling storm-water–related overflows from wastewater treatment plants... Pathogens are not even included in the fish advisories used by states, under the, to protect the health of recreational anglers... In fact, the way pathogen contamination is measured in surface waters has not been updated since the 1960s, even though we know that testing for so-called coliform bacteria provides little reliable information on viruses or microparasites, which are much more dangerous pathogens... These are environmental health issues of the highest priority... The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has a critical role in improving our knowledge on the role of the environment in the emergence and dispersion of infectious pathogens and human disease, including ecologic cycling of pathogens, the regulation of reservoirs of antimicrobial resistance, and the persistence of pathogens in soils and other media.

Show MeSH