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The effects of a graduated aerobic exercise programme on cardiovascular disease risk factors in the NHS workplace: a randomised controlled trial.

Hewitt JA, Whyte GP, Moreton M, van Someren KA, Levine TS - J Occup Med Toxicol (2008)

Bottom Line: Sufficient levels of physical activity provide cardio-protective benefit.There was also a reduction from baseline in CRP at week 4 (-0.4 +/- 0.6 mg.L-1) and 8 (-0.9 +/- 0.8 mg.L-1) (P < 0.05).The control group showed no such improvements.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Kingston University, Kingston Upon Thames, UK. k0127121@kingston.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Sufficient levels of physical activity provide cardio-protective benefit. However within developed society sedentary work and inflexible working hours promotes physical inactivity. Consequently to ensure a healthy workforce there is a requirement for exercise strategies adaptable to occupational time constraint. This study examined the effect of a 12 week aerobic exercise training intervention programme implemented during working hours on the cardiovascular profile of a sedentary hospital workforce.

Methods: Twenty healthy, sedentary full-time staff members of the North West London Hospital Trust cytology unit were randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 12; mean +/- SD age 41 +/- 8 years, body mass 69 +/- 12 kg) or control (n = 8; mean +/- SD age 42 +/- 8 years, body mass 69 +/- 12 kg) group. The exercise group was prescribed a progressive aerobic exercise-training programme to be performed 4 times a week for 8 weeks (initial intensity 65% peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak)) and to be conducted without further advice for another 4 weeks. The control was instructed to maintain their current physical activity level. Oxygen economy at 2 minutes (2minVO2), 4 minutes (4minVO2), VO2 peak, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), BMI, C-reactive protein (CRP), fasting glucose (GLU) and total cholesterol (TC) were determined in both groups pre-intervention and at 4 week intervals. Both groups completed a weekly Leisure Time Questionnaire to quantify additional exercise load.

Results: The exercise group demonstrated an increase from baseline for VO2 peak at week 4 (5.8 +/- 6.3 %) and 8 (5.0 +/- 8.7 %) (P < 0.05). 2minVO2 was reduced from baseline at week 4 (-10.2 +/- 10.3 %), 8 (-16.8 +/- 10.6 %) and 12 (-15.1 +/- 8.7 %), and 4minVO2 at week 8 (-10.7 +/- 7.9 %) and 12 (-6.8 +/- 9.2) (P < 0.05). There was also a reduction from baseline in CRP at week 4 (-0.4 +/- 0.6 mg.L-1) and 8 (-0.9 +/- 0.8 mg.L-1) (P < 0.05). The control group showed no such improvements.

Conclusion: This is the first objectively monitored RCT to show that moderate exercise can be successfully incorporated into working hours, to significantly improve physical capacity and cardiovascular health.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic experimental time-line of the aerobic exercise training intervention programme.
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Figure 1: Schematic experimental time-line of the aerobic exercise training intervention programme.

Mentions: Physiological tests included blood pressure, body composition, peak oxygen uptake and blood screening, and were performed at pre-intervention and at 4 weekly intervals for a total of 12 weeks. After baseline assessment and at each 4 week reassessment, control subjects were instructed to maintain their current physical activity level, while the exercise group were provided with an individualised progressive exercise prescription of brisk walking or light jogging to be performed 4 times a week for the following 4 weeks (Figure 1.). At 8 weeks no further progression of the exercise training programme was provided, and participants were instructed to maintain the exercise as of week 8 for the final 4 weeks. This was to evaluate if there was any further physiological benefit, or if exercise adherence was affected in the absence of any additional training stimulus. Participants conducted all exercise sessions during their lunch, morning or afternoon breaks, to avoid disturbance to the normal laboratory working routine. Heart rate monitors (F4, Polar electro-oy, Kempele, Finland) were provided to monitor accurately the intensity of the exercise prescribed, and the average heart rate and exercise duration of each session was recorded in an exercise diary. The exercise intensity was initially set to correspond with 65 % of peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak). Participants were instructed on an appropriate warm-up and cool-down procedure, and provided with a supervised exercise session during the initial week of each 4 week period. Progress was checked through personal contact on a weekly basis. At each exercise testing session all participants were provided with an evaluation of their results.


The effects of a graduated aerobic exercise programme on cardiovascular disease risk factors in the NHS workplace: a randomised controlled trial.

Hewitt JA, Whyte GP, Moreton M, van Someren KA, Levine TS - J Occup Med Toxicol (2008)

Schematic experimental time-line of the aerobic exercise training intervention programme.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2289827&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic experimental time-line of the aerobic exercise training intervention programme.
Mentions: Physiological tests included blood pressure, body composition, peak oxygen uptake and blood screening, and were performed at pre-intervention and at 4 weekly intervals for a total of 12 weeks. After baseline assessment and at each 4 week reassessment, control subjects were instructed to maintain their current physical activity level, while the exercise group were provided with an individualised progressive exercise prescription of brisk walking or light jogging to be performed 4 times a week for the following 4 weeks (Figure 1.). At 8 weeks no further progression of the exercise training programme was provided, and participants were instructed to maintain the exercise as of week 8 for the final 4 weeks. This was to evaluate if there was any further physiological benefit, or if exercise adherence was affected in the absence of any additional training stimulus. Participants conducted all exercise sessions during their lunch, morning or afternoon breaks, to avoid disturbance to the normal laboratory working routine. Heart rate monitors (F4, Polar electro-oy, Kempele, Finland) were provided to monitor accurately the intensity of the exercise prescribed, and the average heart rate and exercise duration of each session was recorded in an exercise diary. The exercise intensity was initially set to correspond with 65 % of peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak). Participants were instructed on an appropriate warm-up and cool-down procedure, and provided with a supervised exercise session during the initial week of each 4 week period. Progress was checked through personal contact on a weekly basis. At each exercise testing session all participants were provided with an evaluation of their results.

Bottom Line: Sufficient levels of physical activity provide cardio-protective benefit.There was also a reduction from baseline in CRP at week 4 (-0.4 +/- 0.6 mg.L-1) and 8 (-0.9 +/- 0.8 mg.L-1) (P < 0.05).The control group showed no such improvements.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Kingston University, Kingston Upon Thames, UK. k0127121@kingston.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Sufficient levels of physical activity provide cardio-protective benefit. However within developed society sedentary work and inflexible working hours promotes physical inactivity. Consequently to ensure a healthy workforce there is a requirement for exercise strategies adaptable to occupational time constraint. This study examined the effect of a 12 week aerobic exercise training intervention programme implemented during working hours on the cardiovascular profile of a sedentary hospital workforce.

Methods: Twenty healthy, sedentary full-time staff members of the North West London Hospital Trust cytology unit were randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 12; mean +/- SD age 41 +/- 8 years, body mass 69 +/- 12 kg) or control (n = 8; mean +/- SD age 42 +/- 8 years, body mass 69 +/- 12 kg) group. The exercise group was prescribed a progressive aerobic exercise-training programme to be performed 4 times a week for 8 weeks (initial intensity 65% peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak)) and to be conducted without further advice for another 4 weeks. The control was instructed to maintain their current physical activity level. Oxygen economy at 2 minutes (2minVO2), 4 minutes (4minVO2), VO2 peak, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), BMI, C-reactive protein (CRP), fasting glucose (GLU) and total cholesterol (TC) were determined in both groups pre-intervention and at 4 week intervals. Both groups completed a weekly Leisure Time Questionnaire to quantify additional exercise load.

Results: The exercise group demonstrated an increase from baseline for VO2 peak at week 4 (5.8 +/- 6.3 %) and 8 (5.0 +/- 8.7 %) (P < 0.05). 2minVO2 was reduced from baseline at week 4 (-10.2 +/- 10.3 %), 8 (-16.8 +/- 10.6 %) and 12 (-15.1 +/- 8.7 %), and 4minVO2 at week 8 (-10.7 +/- 7.9 %) and 12 (-6.8 +/- 9.2) (P < 0.05). There was also a reduction from baseline in CRP at week 4 (-0.4 +/- 0.6 mg.L-1) and 8 (-0.9 +/- 0.8 mg.L-1) (P < 0.05). The control group showed no such improvements.

Conclusion: This is the first objectively monitored RCT to show that moderate exercise can be successfully incorporated into working hours, to significantly improve physical capacity and cardiovascular health.

No MeSH data available.