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Influence of C-peptide on glucose utilisation.

Wilhelm B, Kann P, Pfützner A - Exp Diabetes Res (2008)

Bottom Line: During the recent years, multiple studies demonstrated that C-peptide is not an inert peptide, but exerts important physiological effects.C-peptide binds to cell membranes, stimulates the Na,K-ATPase and the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase.The aim of this paper is to give an overview over the published studies regarding C-peptide and glucose metabolism from in vitro studies to longer lasting studies in humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Clinical Research and Development, Parcusstrasse 8, Mainz 55116, Germany. birgitw@ikfe.de

ABSTRACT
During the recent years, multiple studies demonstrated that C-peptide is not an inert peptide, but exerts important physiological effects. C-peptide binds to cell membranes, stimulates the Na,K-ATPase and the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase. Moreover, there is evidence that C-peptide decreases glomerular hyperfiltration and increases glucose utilisation. Nevertheless, there is still limited knowledge concerning mechanisms leading to an increased glucose utilisation either in rats or in humans. The aim of this paper is to give an overview over the published studies regarding C-peptide and glucose metabolism from in vitro studies to longer lasting studies in humans.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Glucose utilisation in g during an euglygemic clamp with low and highinsulin concentrations in healthy controls (C), Diabetes mellitus type 1 andafter administration of C-peptide (C+C) and (D+C).
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fig2: Glucose utilisation in g during an euglygemic clamp with low and highinsulin concentrations in healthy controls (C), Diabetes mellitus type 1 andafter administration of C-peptide (C+C) and (D+C).

Mentions: Forearm uptake of glucose after a 5-minute rhythmic dynamic exercisewith a handergometer increased significantly after C-Peptide infusion (−4.8 ± 3.1 versus 13.6 ± 3.2 umol · min−1100 mL−1) inpatients with diabetes mellitus [10]. We investigated in our study with 13patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and 13 healthy control glucoseutilisation after administration of C-peptide (8 pgmol/kg/body weight/min)over 2 hours during an euglycemic clamp procedure with either a high-dose (1.0 Ul/kg body weight/min) or a low-dose insulin infusion (0.25 mU/kg body weight/min).The C-peptide levels reached are shown in Figure 1. After C-peptide infusion,glucose utilisation increased in patients with diabetes mellitus (51.5 ± 25.6 versus 74.51 ± 22.93 g) and healthy controls (74.91 ± 22.01versus 99.38 ± 24.24 g) statistically significant (P < .001)during high-dose insulin infusion and from 16.31 ± 13.34 to 18.8 ± 16.2 g in the diabetic patients and from 20.74 ± 9.96 to 35.8 ± 13.5 g in the healthy controls, the results are given in Figure 2 [11]. In a recent study [12], it has been discussedthat C-peptide might increase the bioavailability of insulin by promoting thedisaggregation of hexameric insulin. The combined injection of insulin andC-peptide required a greater amount and longer duration of glucose than insulinalone in patients with diabetes type 1. In another setting, the same groupapplied insulin and C-peptide in the same and in two separate depots and foundthat the reduction in plasma glucose was significantly faster when administeredin the same depot. The amount of glucose that has to be infused in order toavoid a hypoglycaemia was 129% (P < .01) by administration in the samedepot.


Influence of C-peptide on glucose utilisation.

Wilhelm B, Kann P, Pfützner A - Exp Diabetes Res (2008)

Glucose utilisation in g during an euglygemic clamp with low and highinsulin concentrations in healthy controls (C), Diabetes mellitus type 1 andafter administration of C-peptide (C+C) and (D+C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2279165&req=5

fig2: Glucose utilisation in g during an euglygemic clamp with low and highinsulin concentrations in healthy controls (C), Diabetes mellitus type 1 andafter administration of C-peptide (C+C) and (D+C).
Mentions: Forearm uptake of glucose after a 5-minute rhythmic dynamic exercisewith a handergometer increased significantly after C-Peptide infusion (−4.8 ± 3.1 versus 13.6 ± 3.2 umol · min−1100 mL−1) inpatients with diabetes mellitus [10]. We investigated in our study with 13patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and 13 healthy control glucoseutilisation after administration of C-peptide (8 pgmol/kg/body weight/min)over 2 hours during an euglycemic clamp procedure with either a high-dose (1.0 Ul/kg body weight/min) or a low-dose insulin infusion (0.25 mU/kg body weight/min).The C-peptide levels reached are shown in Figure 1. After C-peptide infusion,glucose utilisation increased in patients with diabetes mellitus (51.5 ± 25.6 versus 74.51 ± 22.93 g) and healthy controls (74.91 ± 22.01versus 99.38 ± 24.24 g) statistically significant (P < .001)during high-dose insulin infusion and from 16.31 ± 13.34 to 18.8 ± 16.2 g in the diabetic patients and from 20.74 ± 9.96 to 35.8 ± 13.5 g in the healthy controls, the results are given in Figure 2 [11]. In a recent study [12], it has been discussedthat C-peptide might increase the bioavailability of insulin by promoting thedisaggregation of hexameric insulin. The combined injection of insulin andC-peptide required a greater amount and longer duration of glucose than insulinalone in patients with diabetes type 1. In another setting, the same groupapplied insulin and C-peptide in the same and in two separate depots and foundthat the reduction in plasma glucose was significantly faster when administeredin the same depot. The amount of glucose that has to be infused in order toavoid a hypoglycaemia was 129% (P < .01) by administration in the samedepot.

Bottom Line: During the recent years, multiple studies demonstrated that C-peptide is not an inert peptide, but exerts important physiological effects.C-peptide binds to cell membranes, stimulates the Na,K-ATPase and the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase.The aim of this paper is to give an overview over the published studies regarding C-peptide and glucose metabolism from in vitro studies to longer lasting studies in humans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Clinical Research and Development, Parcusstrasse 8, Mainz 55116, Germany. birgitw@ikfe.de

ABSTRACT
During the recent years, multiple studies demonstrated that C-peptide is not an inert peptide, but exerts important physiological effects. C-peptide binds to cell membranes, stimulates the Na,K-ATPase and the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase. Moreover, there is evidence that C-peptide decreases glomerular hyperfiltration and increases glucose utilisation. Nevertheless, there is still limited knowledge concerning mechanisms leading to an increased glucose utilisation either in rats or in humans. The aim of this paper is to give an overview over the published studies regarding C-peptide and glucose metabolism from in vitro studies to longer lasting studies in humans.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus