Limits...
Merkel cell carcinoma of the upper extremity: case report and an update.

Papamichail M, Nikolaidis I, Nikolaidis N, Glava C, Lentzas I, Marmagkiolis K, Karassavsa K, Digalakis M - World J Surg Oncol (2008)

Bottom Line: No postoperative radiation or adjuvant chemotherapy was given and within 9 years follow up no recurrence was reported.Although most cases present as localized disease treatment should be definitive due to high rates of local or systemic recurrence.Even when locoregional control is achieved close surveillance is required due to high rates of relapse.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: General Hospital of Athens, Asklipion Voulas, Athens, Greece. mp2006gr@yahoo.co.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare but aggressive cutaneous primary small cell carcinoma. It is commonly seen in elderly affecting the head, neck, and extremities. Macroscopically may be difficult to distinguish MCC from other small cells neoplasms especially oat cell carcinoma of the lung.

Case presentation: It is presented a case report concerning a 72 years old male with a MMC on the dorsal aspect of the right wrist. The patient underwent a diagnostic excisional biopsy and after the histological confirmation of the diagnosis a second excision was performed to achieve free margins. No postoperative radiation or adjuvant chemotherapy was given and within 9 years follow up no recurrence was reported.

Conclusion: Although most cases present as localized disease treatment should be definitive due to high rates of local or systemic recurrence. Treatment includes excision of the lesion, lymphadenectomy, postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy depending on the stage of the disease. Even when locoregional control is achieved close surveillance is required due to high rates of relapse.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Macroscopic view of the lesion
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2279132&req=5

Figure 1: Macroscopic view of the lesion

Mentions: A 72-year-old male presented in December 1998 with a painless nodular, red and firm 2 cm plaque located on the dorsal aspect of the right wrist (Figure 1) noticed 1–2 months before. No history of previous skin lesions elsewhere was reported.


Merkel cell carcinoma of the upper extremity: case report and an update.

Papamichail M, Nikolaidis I, Nikolaidis N, Glava C, Lentzas I, Marmagkiolis K, Karassavsa K, Digalakis M - World J Surg Oncol (2008)

Macroscopic view of the lesion
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2279132&req=5

Figure 1: Macroscopic view of the lesion
Mentions: A 72-year-old male presented in December 1998 with a painless nodular, red and firm 2 cm plaque located on the dorsal aspect of the right wrist (Figure 1) noticed 1–2 months before. No history of previous skin lesions elsewhere was reported.

Bottom Line: No postoperative radiation or adjuvant chemotherapy was given and within 9 years follow up no recurrence was reported.Although most cases present as localized disease treatment should be definitive due to high rates of local or systemic recurrence.Even when locoregional control is achieved close surveillance is required due to high rates of relapse.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: General Hospital of Athens, Asklipion Voulas, Athens, Greece. mp2006gr@yahoo.co.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare but aggressive cutaneous primary small cell carcinoma. It is commonly seen in elderly affecting the head, neck, and extremities. Macroscopically may be difficult to distinguish MCC from other small cells neoplasms especially oat cell carcinoma of the lung.

Case presentation: It is presented a case report concerning a 72 years old male with a MMC on the dorsal aspect of the right wrist. The patient underwent a diagnostic excisional biopsy and after the histological confirmation of the diagnosis a second excision was performed to achieve free margins. No postoperative radiation or adjuvant chemotherapy was given and within 9 years follow up no recurrence was reported.

Conclusion: Although most cases present as localized disease treatment should be definitive due to high rates of local or systemic recurrence. Treatment includes excision of the lesion, lymphadenectomy, postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy depending on the stage of the disease. Even when locoregional control is achieved close surveillance is required due to high rates of relapse.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus