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Is a history of work-related low back injury associated with prevalent low back pain and depression in the general population?

Hincapié CA, Cassidy JD, Côté P - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2008)

Bottom Line: Fifty-five percent of the eligible population participated.No association was found between a history of work-related low back injury and depression (OR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.55-1.30).These results suggest that past work-related low back injury may be an important risk factor for future episodes of low back pain and disability in the general population.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Research Expertise in Improved Disability Outcomes (CREIDO), University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. cesar.hincapie@uhnresearch.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Little is known about the role of prior occupational low back injury in future episodes of low back pain and disability in the general population. We conducted a study to determine if a lifetime history of work-related low back injury is associated with prevalent severity-graded low back pain, depressive symptoms, or both, in the general population.

Methods: We used data from the Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey - a population-based cross-sectional survey mailed to a random, stratified sample of 2,184 Saskatchewan adults 20 to 69 years of age in 1995. Information on the main independent variable was gathered by asking respondents whether they had ever injured their low back at work. Our outcomes, the 6-month period prevalence of severity-graded low back pain and depressive symptoms during the past week, were measured with valid and reliable questionnaires. The associations between prior work-related low back injury and our outcomes were estimated through multinomial and binary multivariable logistic regression with adjustment for age, gender, and other important covariates.

Results: Fifty-five percent of the eligible population participated. Of the 1,086 participants who responded to the question about the main independent variable, 38.0% reported a history of work-related low back injury. A history of work-related low back injury was positively associated with low intensity/low disability low back pain (OR, 3.66; 95%CI, 2.48-5.42), with high intensity/low disability low back pain (OR, 4.03; 95%CI, 2.41-6.76), and with high disability low back pain (OR, 6.76; 95%CI, 3.80-12.01). No association was found between a history of work-related low back injury and depression (OR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.55-1.30).

Conclusion: Our analysis shows an association between past occupational low back injury and increasing severity of prevalent low back pain, but not depression. These results suggest that past work-related low back injury may be an important risk factor for future episodes of low back pain and disability in the general population.

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Age-group and gender specific distribution of lifetime history of work-related low back injury (n = 413).
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Figure 1: Age-group and gender specific distribution of lifetime history of work-related low back injury (n = 413).

Mentions: Of the 1,131 eligible participants, 1,086 responded to the question about the main independent variable. Of these, 38.0% (413/1,086) reported a positive history of work-related low back injury. A history of work-related low back injury was more common in men than in women from all age groups except the 20- to 29-year-old age group, where the proportions of men and women with a history of injury were similar (Figure 1). The characteristics of the study sample stratified by history of low back injury at work and the supplementary variable, history of time off or light duties due to a work-related low back injury, are presented in Tables 2, 3, 4. A higher proportion of respondents with a history of work-related low back injury lived in rural Saskatchewan and a higher percentage also reported an annual household income of less than $40,000 (Table 2). In addition, a lower proportion of previously injured respondents had at least some post-secondary education.


Is a history of work-related low back injury associated with prevalent low back pain and depression in the general population?

Hincapié CA, Cassidy JD, Côté P - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2008)

Age-group and gender specific distribution of lifetime history of work-related low back injury (n = 413).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2277439&req=5

Figure 1: Age-group and gender specific distribution of lifetime history of work-related low back injury (n = 413).
Mentions: Of the 1,131 eligible participants, 1,086 responded to the question about the main independent variable. Of these, 38.0% (413/1,086) reported a positive history of work-related low back injury. A history of work-related low back injury was more common in men than in women from all age groups except the 20- to 29-year-old age group, where the proportions of men and women with a history of injury were similar (Figure 1). The characteristics of the study sample stratified by history of low back injury at work and the supplementary variable, history of time off or light duties due to a work-related low back injury, are presented in Tables 2, 3, 4. A higher proportion of respondents with a history of work-related low back injury lived in rural Saskatchewan and a higher percentage also reported an annual household income of less than $40,000 (Table 2). In addition, a lower proportion of previously injured respondents had at least some post-secondary education.

Bottom Line: Fifty-five percent of the eligible population participated.No association was found between a history of work-related low back injury and depression (OR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.55-1.30).These results suggest that past work-related low back injury may be an important risk factor for future episodes of low back pain and disability in the general population.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Research Expertise in Improved Disability Outcomes (CREIDO), University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. cesar.hincapie@uhnresearch.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Little is known about the role of prior occupational low back injury in future episodes of low back pain and disability in the general population. We conducted a study to determine if a lifetime history of work-related low back injury is associated with prevalent severity-graded low back pain, depressive symptoms, or both, in the general population.

Methods: We used data from the Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey - a population-based cross-sectional survey mailed to a random, stratified sample of 2,184 Saskatchewan adults 20 to 69 years of age in 1995. Information on the main independent variable was gathered by asking respondents whether they had ever injured their low back at work. Our outcomes, the 6-month period prevalence of severity-graded low back pain and depressive symptoms during the past week, were measured with valid and reliable questionnaires. The associations between prior work-related low back injury and our outcomes were estimated through multinomial and binary multivariable logistic regression with adjustment for age, gender, and other important covariates.

Results: Fifty-five percent of the eligible population participated. Of the 1,086 participants who responded to the question about the main independent variable, 38.0% reported a history of work-related low back injury. A history of work-related low back injury was positively associated with low intensity/low disability low back pain (OR, 3.66; 95%CI, 2.48-5.42), with high intensity/low disability low back pain (OR, 4.03; 95%CI, 2.41-6.76), and with high disability low back pain (OR, 6.76; 95%CI, 3.80-12.01). No association was found between a history of work-related low back injury and depression (OR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.55-1.30).

Conclusion: Our analysis shows an association between past occupational low back injury and increasing severity of prevalent low back pain, but not depression. These results suggest that past work-related low back injury may be an important risk factor for future episodes of low back pain and disability in the general population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus