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Influence on fluid dynamics of coronary artery outlet angle variation in artificial aortic root prosthesis.

Verhey JF, Bara C - Biomed Eng Online (2008)

Bottom Line: The pressure and velocity distributions of both models are compared in the ascending aorta as well as in the right and the left coronary artery.The sinus design and variations of the outlet angle of the coronary arteries were able to minimally optimize the perfusion pressure and the velocities in the coronary circulation, although the degree of such changes is rather low and would probably not achieve any clinical influence.Our results show that surgeons should feel relatively free to vary the outlet angle within the anatomic structural conditions when employing the technique of coronary reinsertion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: MVIP ImagingProducts GmbH, Nörten-Hardenberg, Germany. jverhey@mvip.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Because of higher life expectancy, the number of elderly patients today with degenerative aortic diseases is on the increase. Often artificial aortic roots are needed to replace the native tissue. This surgical procedure requires re-implantation of the previous separated coronary arteries into the wall of the prosthesis. Regardless of the prosthesis type, changes in the reinsertion technique, e.g., the variation of the outlet angle of the coronary arteries, could influence the coronary blood flow. Whether the prosthesis type or the outlet angle variation significantly improves the blood circulation and lowers the risk of coronary insufficiency is still an open question. The numerical calculations presented can help to clear up these disputable questions.

Methods: Two simplified base geometries are used for simulating the blood flow in order to determine velocity and pressure distributions. One model uses a straight cylindrical tube to approximate the aortic root geometry; the other uses a sinus design with pseudosinuses of Valsalva. The coronary outlet angle of the right coronary artery was discretely modified in both models in the range from 60 degrees to 120 degrees . The pressure and velocity distributions of both models are compared in the ascending aorta as well as in the right and the left coronary artery.

Results: The potentially allowed and anatomic limited variation of the outlet angle influences the pressure only a little bit and shows a very slight relative maximum between 70 degrees and 90 degrees . The sinus design and variations of the outlet angle of the coronary arteries were able to minimally optimize the perfusion pressure and the velocities in the coronary circulation, although the degree of such changes is rather low and would probably not achieve any clinical influence.

Conclusion: Our results show that surgeons should feel relatively free to vary the outlet angle within the anatomic structural conditions when employing the technique of coronary reinsertion.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Variation of the outlet angle of the right coronary artery and its effect on the pressure for both models. (a) Shows the perfusion pressure for the right coronary artery. (b) and (c) show similar curves for the left coronary artery and for the ascending aorta. Values for the model M1 are coloured blue, for the model M2 with "Windkessel" sinus design geometry are coloured pink, respectively.
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Figure 5: Variation of the outlet angle of the right coronary artery and its effect on the pressure for both models. (a) Shows the perfusion pressure for the right coronary artery. (b) and (c) show similar curves for the left coronary artery and for the ascending aorta. Values for the model M1 are coloured blue, for the model M2 with "Windkessel" sinus design geometry are coloured pink, respectively.

Mentions: The simulation results for pressure and velocity distributions are shown in Figure 3 and Figure 4. Transversal profiles are presented in both figures. Detailed quantified results for the pressures observed in the three outlets (right and left coronary artery as well as the ascending aorta) are given in the Figure 5.


Influence on fluid dynamics of coronary artery outlet angle variation in artificial aortic root prosthesis.

Verhey JF, Bara C - Biomed Eng Online (2008)

Variation of the outlet angle of the right coronary artery and its effect on the pressure for both models. (a) Shows the perfusion pressure for the right coronary artery. (b) and (c) show similar curves for the left coronary artery and for the ascending aorta. Values for the model M1 are coloured blue, for the model M2 with "Windkessel" sinus design geometry are coloured pink, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2275278&req=5

Figure 5: Variation of the outlet angle of the right coronary artery and its effect on the pressure for both models. (a) Shows the perfusion pressure for the right coronary artery. (b) and (c) show similar curves for the left coronary artery and for the ascending aorta. Values for the model M1 are coloured blue, for the model M2 with "Windkessel" sinus design geometry are coloured pink, respectively.
Mentions: The simulation results for pressure and velocity distributions are shown in Figure 3 and Figure 4. Transversal profiles are presented in both figures. Detailed quantified results for the pressures observed in the three outlets (right and left coronary artery as well as the ascending aorta) are given in the Figure 5.

Bottom Line: The pressure and velocity distributions of both models are compared in the ascending aorta as well as in the right and the left coronary artery.The sinus design and variations of the outlet angle of the coronary arteries were able to minimally optimize the perfusion pressure and the velocities in the coronary circulation, although the degree of such changes is rather low and would probably not achieve any clinical influence.Our results show that surgeons should feel relatively free to vary the outlet angle within the anatomic structural conditions when employing the technique of coronary reinsertion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: MVIP ImagingProducts GmbH, Nörten-Hardenberg, Germany. jverhey@mvip.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Because of higher life expectancy, the number of elderly patients today with degenerative aortic diseases is on the increase. Often artificial aortic roots are needed to replace the native tissue. This surgical procedure requires re-implantation of the previous separated coronary arteries into the wall of the prosthesis. Regardless of the prosthesis type, changes in the reinsertion technique, e.g., the variation of the outlet angle of the coronary arteries, could influence the coronary blood flow. Whether the prosthesis type or the outlet angle variation significantly improves the blood circulation and lowers the risk of coronary insufficiency is still an open question. The numerical calculations presented can help to clear up these disputable questions.

Methods: Two simplified base geometries are used for simulating the blood flow in order to determine velocity and pressure distributions. One model uses a straight cylindrical tube to approximate the aortic root geometry; the other uses a sinus design with pseudosinuses of Valsalva. The coronary outlet angle of the right coronary artery was discretely modified in both models in the range from 60 degrees to 120 degrees . The pressure and velocity distributions of both models are compared in the ascending aorta as well as in the right and the left coronary artery.

Results: The potentially allowed and anatomic limited variation of the outlet angle influences the pressure only a little bit and shows a very slight relative maximum between 70 degrees and 90 degrees . The sinus design and variations of the outlet angle of the coronary arteries were able to minimally optimize the perfusion pressure and the velocities in the coronary circulation, although the degree of such changes is rather low and would probably not achieve any clinical influence.

Conclusion: Our results show that surgeons should feel relatively free to vary the outlet angle within the anatomic structural conditions when employing the technique of coronary reinsertion.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus