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HIV/AIDS in Nigeria: a bibliometric analysis.

Uthman OA - BMC Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: A high pattern of co-authorship was found.Nigeria has achieved a significant increase in the number of SCI publications and collaborations in HIV literature from 1987 to 2005.There is need to challenge the status, scientists from Nigeria should forge multiple collaborations beyond historical, political, and cultural lines to share knowledge and expertise on HIV/AIDS.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Evidence-Based Global Health, Save the Youth Initiative, Nigeria. uthlekan@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Nigeria is home to more people living with HIV than any other country in the world, except South Africa and India-where an estimated 2.9 million [1.7 million - 4.2 million] people were living with the virus in 2005. A systematic assessment of recent HIV/AIDS research output from Nigeria is not available. Without objective information about the current deficiencies and strengths in the HIV research output from Nigeria, it is difficult to plan substantial improvements in HIV/AIDS research that could enhance population health. The aim of this study was to analyse the trends in Nigeria's SCI publications in HIV/AIDS from 1980 to 2006. Special attention was paid to internationally collaborated works that were identified based on the countries of the authors' affiliation.

Methods: A bibliometric analysis regarding Nigerian HIV/AIDS research was conducted in the ISI databases for the period of 1980 to 2006. An attempt was made to identify the patterns of the growth in HIV/AIDS literature, as well as type of document published, authorship, institutional affiliations of authors, and subject content. International collaboration was deemed to exist in an article if any co-author's affiliation was located outside Nigeria. The impact factors in the 2006 Journal Citations Reports Science Edition was arbitrarily adopted to estimate the quality of articles.

Results: Nigeria's ISI publications in HIV/AIDS increased from one articles in 1987 to 33 in 2006, and the articles with international collaboration increased from one articles in 1980 to 16 in 2006. Articles with international collaboration appeared in journals with higher impact factors and received more citations. A high pattern of co-authorship was found. Over 85% of the articles were published in collaboration among two or more authors. The USA, as the most important collaborating partner of Nigeria's HIV/AIDS researchers, contributed 30.8% of articles with international collaboration.

Conclusion: Nigeria has achieved a significant increase in the number of SCI publications and collaborations in HIV literature from 1987 to 2005. There is need to challenge the status, scientists from Nigeria should forge multiple collaborations beyond historical, political, and cultural lines to share knowledge and expertise on HIV/AIDS.

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Trends in Nigeria's HIV/AIDS literature publications in Web of Science. No records were found for the period of 1980 to 1986.
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Figure 1: Trends in Nigeria's HIV/AIDS literature publications in Web of Science. No records were found for the period of 1980 to 1986.

Mentions: A total of 254 records of articles in which the publication years were between 1987 and 2006, indexed to HIV/AIDS, and at least one author's affiliation was located in Nigeria. Most of the studies [n = 253 (99.6%)] were in English language. Only one article was published in French. Nigeria's ISI publications in HIV/AIDS increased from one articles in 1987 to 33 in 2006, and the articles with international collaboration increased from one articles in 1980 to 16 articles in 2006. No records were found for the period of 1980 to 1986; and only one record was retrieved for 1987 and 1989 (Figure 1). There was not statistically significant correlation between number of articles in each year and percentage of articles with international collaboration (Kendall's tau-b coefficient = 0.23, p = 0.139).


HIV/AIDS in Nigeria: a bibliometric analysis.

Uthman OA - BMC Infect. Dis. (2008)

Trends in Nigeria's HIV/AIDS literature publications in Web of Science. No records were found for the period of 1980 to 1986.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2268690&req=5

Figure 1: Trends in Nigeria's HIV/AIDS literature publications in Web of Science. No records were found for the period of 1980 to 1986.
Mentions: A total of 254 records of articles in which the publication years were between 1987 and 2006, indexed to HIV/AIDS, and at least one author's affiliation was located in Nigeria. Most of the studies [n = 253 (99.6%)] were in English language. Only one article was published in French. Nigeria's ISI publications in HIV/AIDS increased from one articles in 1987 to 33 in 2006, and the articles with international collaboration increased from one articles in 1980 to 16 articles in 2006. No records were found for the period of 1980 to 1986; and only one record was retrieved for 1987 and 1989 (Figure 1). There was not statistically significant correlation between number of articles in each year and percentage of articles with international collaboration (Kendall's tau-b coefficient = 0.23, p = 0.139).

Bottom Line: A high pattern of co-authorship was found.Nigeria has achieved a significant increase in the number of SCI publications and collaborations in HIV literature from 1987 to 2005.There is need to challenge the status, scientists from Nigeria should forge multiple collaborations beyond historical, political, and cultural lines to share knowledge and expertise on HIV/AIDS.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Evidence-Based Global Health, Save the Youth Initiative, Nigeria. uthlekan@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Nigeria is home to more people living with HIV than any other country in the world, except South Africa and India-where an estimated 2.9 million [1.7 million - 4.2 million] people were living with the virus in 2005. A systematic assessment of recent HIV/AIDS research output from Nigeria is not available. Without objective information about the current deficiencies and strengths in the HIV research output from Nigeria, it is difficult to plan substantial improvements in HIV/AIDS research that could enhance population health. The aim of this study was to analyse the trends in Nigeria's SCI publications in HIV/AIDS from 1980 to 2006. Special attention was paid to internationally collaborated works that were identified based on the countries of the authors' affiliation.

Methods: A bibliometric analysis regarding Nigerian HIV/AIDS research was conducted in the ISI databases for the period of 1980 to 2006. An attempt was made to identify the patterns of the growth in HIV/AIDS literature, as well as type of document published, authorship, institutional affiliations of authors, and subject content. International collaboration was deemed to exist in an article if any co-author's affiliation was located outside Nigeria. The impact factors in the 2006 Journal Citations Reports Science Edition was arbitrarily adopted to estimate the quality of articles.

Results: Nigeria's ISI publications in HIV/AIDS increased from one articles in 1987 to 33 in 2006, and the articles with international collaboration increased from one articles in 1980 to 16 in 2006. Articles with international collaboration appeared in journals with higher impact factors and received more citations. A high pattern of co-authorship was found. Over 85% of the articles were published in collaboration among two or more authors. The USA, as the most important collaborating partner of Nigeria's HIV/AIDS researchers, contributed 30.8% of articles with international collaboration.

Conclusion: Nigeria has achieved a significant increase in the number of SCI publications and collaborations in HIV literature from 1987 to 2005. There is need to challenge the status, scientists from Nigeria should forge multiple collaborations beyond historical, political, and cultural lines to share knowledge and expertise on HIV/AIDS.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus