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Usefulness of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating solitary pulmonary nodules.

Fujimoto K - Cancer Imaging (2008)

Bottom Line: Although the clinical role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for SPNs remains limited, considerable experience has been gained with MRI of thoracic diseases.Dynamic MRI and dynamic CT are useful for differentiating between malignant and benign SPNs (especially tuberculomas and hamartomas).Furthermore, dynamic MRI is useful for assessing tumor vascularity, interstitium, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression, and for predicting survival outcome among patients with peripheral pulmonary carcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine and Center for Diagnostic Imaging, Kurume University Hospital, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka, 830-0011 Japan. kimichan@med.kurume-u.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
Evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) poses a challenge to radiologists. Chest computed tomography (CT) is considered the standard technique for assessing morphologic findings and intrathoracic spread of an SPN. Although the clinical role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for SPNs remains limited, considerable experience has been gained with MRI of thoracic diseases. Dynamic MRI and dynamic CT are useful for differentiating between malignant and benign SPNs (especially tuberculomas and hamartomas). Furthermore, dynamic MRI is useful for assessing tumor vascularity, interstitium, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression, and for predicting survival outcome among patients with peripheral pulmonary carcinoma. These advantages make dynamic MRI a promising method and a potential biomarker for characterizing tumor response to anti-angiogenic treatment as well as for predicting survival outcomes after treatment.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A case of inactive tuberculoma in a 36-year-old man. A post-contrast-enhanced MR axial image (A) and a coronal image (B) show a nodular lesion with an area of enhancement of 2 mm or less on the outer rim of the lesion (thin-rim enhancement pattern, arrowheads).
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Figure 5: A case of inactive tuberculoma in a 36-year-old man. A post-contrast-enhanced MR axial image (A) and a coronal image (B) show a nodular lesion with an area of enhancement of 2 mm or less on the outer rim of the lesion (thin-rim enhancement pattern, arrowheads).

Mentions: Although dynamic study is usually not necessary, there are some useful enhancement characteristics (compared with signal intensities before and after injection of contrast material) for assessing the characteristics of an SPN.


Usefulness of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating solitary pulmonary nodules.

Fujimoto K - Cancer Imaging (2008)

A case of inactive tuberculoma in a 36-year-old man. A post-contrast-enhanced MR axial image (A) and a coronal image (B) show a nodular lesion with an area of enhancement of 2 mm or less on the outer rim of the lesion (thin-rim enhancement pattern, arrowheads).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2267694&req=5

Figure 5: A case of inactive tuberculoma in a 36-year-old man. A post-contrast-enhanced MR axial image (A) and a coronal image (B) show a nodular lesion with an area of enhancement of 2 mm or less on the outer rim of the lesion (thin-rim enhancement pattern, arrowheads).
Mentions: Although dynamic study is usually not necessary, there are some useful enhancement characteristics (compared with signal intensities before and after injection of contrast material) for assessing the characteristics of an SPN.

Bottom Line: Although the clinical role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for SPNs remains limited, considerable experience has been gained with MRI of thoracic diseases.Dynamic MRI and dynamic CT are useful for differentiating between malignant and benign SPNs (especially tuberculomas and hamartomas).Furthermore, dynamic MRI is useful for assessing tumor vascularity, interstitium, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression, and for predicting survival outcome among patients with peripheral pulmonary carcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine and Center for Diagnostic Imaging, Kurume University Hospital, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka, 830-0011 Japan. kimichan@med.kurume-u.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
Evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) poses a challenge to radiologists. Chest computed tomography (CT) is considered the standard technique for assessing morphologic findings and intrathoracic spread of an SPN. Although the clinical role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for SPNs remains limited, considerable experience has been gained with MRI of thoracic diseases. Dynamic MRI and dynamic CT are useful for differentiating between malignant and benign SPNs (especially tuberculomas and hamartomas). Furthermore, dynamic MRI is useful for assessing tumor vascularity, interstitium, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression, and for predicting survival outcome among patients with peripheral pulmonary carcinoma. These advantages make dynamic MRI a promising method and a potential biomarker for characterizing tumor response to anti-angiogenic treatment as well as for predicting survival outcomes after treatment.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus