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Cutaneous lesions of the external ear.

Sand M, Sand D, Brors D, Altmeyer P, Mann B, Bechara FG - Head Face Med (2008)

Bottom Line: Skin diseases on the external aspect of the ear are seen in a variety of medical disciplines.Dermatologists, othorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners, general and plastic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the ear.This article will focus on those diseases wherefore surgery or laser therapy is considered as a possible treatment option or which are potentially subject to surgical evaluation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Augusta Kranken Anstalt, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. michael.sand@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

ABSTRACT
Skin diseases on the external aspect of the ear are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, othorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners, general and plastic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the ear. This article will focus on those diseases wherefore surgery or laser therapy is considered as a possible treatment option or which are potentially subject to surgical evaluation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Keloid. Flesh colored to reddish to slight purple nodule on the helical rim. The exophytic tumor shows a smooth surface.
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Figure 5: Keloid. Flesh colored to reddish to slight purple nodule on the helical rim. The exophytic tumor shows a smooth surface.

Mentions: Keloid is first described in the Smith Papyrus from ancient Egypt [45]. It is derived from the word cheloide which was in the modern languages first mentioned by the French physician Noël Retz in 1790 and later described by Jean Louis Alibert in 1816 [46,47]. It is composed of the Greek words chele (ҳηλη), meaning crab's claw, and the suffix -oid, meaning like. Keloids are dermal fibrotic lesions which are considered an aberration of the wound healing process. They are included in the spectrum of fibroproliferative disorders and commonly affect the ears. Clinically dense dermal scar tissue projects above the surrounding skin which is sometimes tender or pruritic (Fig. 5). Keloids on the ear can sometimes be pedunculated. Histology shows thick hyalinized collagen bundles, abundant ground substance, few fibroblasts, and few if any foreign body reactions. They are common after small skin excisions, ear piercing, drainage of auricular hematomas, repair of other auricular traumas, viral infection (smallpox, and herpes varicella-zoster) or as secondary keloid formation after prior keloid excision. In a review of 1200 pierced ears, Simplot et al. report a keloid formation in 2.5% [48]. Several procedures have been described for effective treatment of post-surgical keloid scars. They include silicon occlusive dressings, mechanical compression, radiation, cryosurgery, topical Imiquimod application, bleomycin tattooing, intralesional injections of steroids, 5-floururacil, as well as interferon-alpha, -beta or -gamma in combination with excisional surgery [49-55]. Although optimal conditions for the prevention of keloid formation are still unknown the combination of excisional surgery and the placement of a silicone gel sheet over the wound surface with the application of light pressure are known to be advantageous [56-58].


Cutaneous lesions of the external ear.

Sand M, Sand D, Brors D, Altmeyer P, Mann B, Bechara FG - Head Face Med (2008)

Keloid. Flesh colored to reddish to slight purple nodule on the helical rim. The exophytic tumor shows a smooth surface.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2267455&req=5

Figure 5: Keloid. Flesh colored to reddish to slight purple nodule on the helical rim. The exophytic tumor shows a smooth surface.
Mentions: Keloid is first described in the Smith Papyrus from ancient Egypt [45]. It is derived from the word cheloide which was in the modern languages first mentioned by the French physician Noël Retz in 1790 and later described by Jean Louis Alibert in 1816 [46,47]. It is composed of the Greek words chele (ҳηλη), meaning crab's claw, and the suffix -oid, meaning like. Keloids are dermal fibrotic lesions which are considered an aberration of the wound healing process. They are included in the spectrum of fibroproliferative disorders and commonly affect the ears. Clinically dense dermal scar tissue projects above the surrounding skin which is sometimes tender or pruritic (Fig. 5). Keloids on the ear can sometimes be pedunculated. Histology shows thick hyalinized collagen bundles, abundant ground substance, few fibroblasts, and few if any foreign body reactions. They are common after small skin excisions, ear piercing, drainage of auricular hematomas, repair of other auricular traumas, viral infection (smallpox, and herpes varicella-zoster) or as secondary keloid formation after prior keloid excision. In a review of 1200 pierced ears, Simplot et al. report a keloid formation in 2.5% [48]. Several procedures have been described for effective treatment of post-surgical keloid scars. They include silicon occlusive dressings, mechanical compression, radiation, cryosurgery, topical Imiquimod application, bleomycin tattooing, intralesional injections of steroids, 5-floururacil, as well as interferon-alpha, -beta or -gamma in combination with excisional surgery [49-55]. Although optimal conditions for the prevention of keloid formation are still unknown the combination of excisional surgery and the placement of a silicone gel sheet over the wound surface with the application of light pressure are known to be advantageous [56-58].

Bottom Line: Skin diseases on the external aspect of the ear are seen in a variety of medical disciplines.Dermatologists, othorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners, general and plastic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the ear.This article will focus on those diseases wherefore surgery or laser therapy is considered as a possible treatment option or which are potentially subject to surgical evaluation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Augusta Kranken Anstalt, Academic Teaching Hospital of the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. michael.sand@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

ABSTRACT
Skin diseases on the external aspect of the ear are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, othorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners, general and plastic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the ear. This article will focus on those diseases wherefore surgery or laser therapy is considered as a possible treatment option or which are potentially subject to surgical evaluation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus