Limits...
The biennial cycle of respiratory syncytial virus outbreaks in Croatia.

Mlinaric-Galinovic G, Welliver RC, Vilibic-Cavlek T, Ljubin-Sternak S, Drazenovic V, Galinovic I, Tomic V - Virol. J. (2008)

Bottom Line: In the Zagreb area, RSV outbreaks were proven to vary in a two-year cycle, which was repeated every 23-25 months.This biennial cycle comprised one larger and one smaller season.Climate factors correlated significantly with the number of RSV cases identified only in the large seasons, which suggests that the biennial cycle is likely to continue regardless of meteorological conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Virology, Croatian National Institute of Public Health, Rockefellerova 12, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. gordana.galinovic@hzjz.hr

ABSTRACT
The paper analyses the epidemic pattern of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreaks in children in Croatia. Over a period of 11 consecutive winter seasons (1994-2005) 3,435 inpatients from Zagreb County aged from infancy to 10 years who were hospitalised with acute respiratory tract infections were tested for RSV-infection. RSV was identified in nasopharyngeal secretions of patients by virus isolation in cell culture and by detection of viral antigen with monoclonal antibodies. In the Zagreb area, RSV outbreaks were proven to vary in a two-year cycle, which was repeated every 23-25 months. This biennial cycle comprised one larger and one smaller season. Climate factors correlated significantly with the number of RSV cases identified only in the large seasons, which suggests that the biennial cycle is likely to continue regardless of meteorological conditions. Knowledge of this biennial pattern should be useful in predicting the onset of RSV outbreaks in Croatia, and would facilitate planning for the prevention and control of RSV infections in the region.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Average values of number of RSV-positive patients, maximum daily temperature and maximum humidity with 95 percent probability confidence interval of biennial cycle of RSV-infections in Croatia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2267449&req=5

Figure 2: Average values of number of RSV-positive patients, maximum daily temperature and maximum humidity with 95 percent probability confidence interval of biennial cycle of RSV-infections in Croatia.

Mentions: An analysis of the monthly occurrence of RSV outbreaks through the 11 years of the study established an alternating cycle. Thus RSV epidemics peaked in December/January of years 1994/95, 1996/97, 1998/99, 2000/01, 2002/03, and 2004/05 ("large seasons"), but in March/April of years 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2004 ("small seasons") (Fig. 1). This finding suggests that there are two separate seasons (Fig. 2) because July, August and September of even years have, on average, only 0.0, 0.7 and 0.3 infections, respectively.


The biennial cycle of respiratory syncytial virus outbreaks in Croatia.

Mlinaric-Galinovic G, Welliver RC, Vilibic-Cavlek T, Ljubin-Sternak S, Drazenovic V, Galinovic I, Tomic V - Virol. J. (2008)

Average values of number of RSV-positive patients, maximum daily temperature and maximum humidity with 95 percent probability confidence interval of biennial cycle of RSV-infections in Croatia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2267449&req=5

Figure 2: Average values of number of RSV-positive patients, maximum daily temperature and maximum humidity with 95 percent probability confidence interval of biennial cycle of RSV-infections in Croatia.
Mentions: An analysis of the monthly occurrence of RSV outbreaks through the 11 years of the study established an alternating cycle. Thus RSV epidemics peaked in December/January of years 1994/95, 1996/97, 1998/99, 2000/01, 2002/03, and 2004/05 ("large seasons"), but in March/April of years 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2004 ("small seasons") (Fig. 1). This finding suggests that there are two separate seasons (Fig. 2) because July, August and September of even years have, on average, only 0.0, 0.7 and 0.3 infections, respectively.

Bottom Line: In the Zagreb area, RSV outbreaks were proven to vary in a two-year cycle, which was repeated every 23-25 months.This biennial cycle comprised one larger and one smaller season.Climate factors correlated significantly with the number of RSV cases identified only in the large seasons, which suggests that the biennial cycle is likely to continue regardless of meteorological conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Virology, Croatian National Institute of Public Health, Rockefellerova 12, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. gordana.galinovic@hzjz.hr

ABSTRACT
The paper analyses the epidemic pattern of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreaks in children in Croatia. Over a period of 11 consecutive winter seasons (1994-2005) 3,435 inpatients from Zagreb County aged from infancy to 10 years who were hospitalised with acute respiratory tract infections were tested for RSV-infection. RSV was identified in nasopharyngeal secretions of patients by virus isolation in cell culture and by detection of viral antigen with monoclonal antibodies. In the Zagreb area, RSV outbreaks were proven to vary in a two-year cycle, which was repeated every 23-25 months. This biennial cycle comprised one larger and one smaller season. Climate factors correlated significantly with the number of RSV cases identified only in the large seasons, which suggests that the biennial cycle is likely to continue regardless of meteorological conditions. Knowledge of this biennial pattern should be useful in predicting the onset of RSV outbreaks in Croatia, and would facilitate planning for the prevention and control of RSV infections in the region.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus