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Dioxin emissions from a municipal solid waste incinerator and risk of invasive breast cancer: a population-based case-control study with GIS-derived exposure.

Viel JF, Clément MC, Hägi M, Grandjean S, Challier B, Danzon A - Int J Health Geogr (2008)

Bottom Line: Among women younger than 60 years old, no increased or decreased risk was found for any dioxin exposure category.Conversely, women over 60 years old living in the highest exposed zone were 0.31 time less likely (95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.89) to develop invasive breast cancer.Before speculating that this decreased risk reflects a dioxin anti-estrogenic activity with greater effect on late-onset acquired breast cancer, some residual confounding must be envisaged.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CNRS no 6249 Chrono-Environment, Faculty of Medicine, 2, place Saint Jacques, 25030 Besançon cedex, France. jean-francois.viel@univ-fcomte.fr

ABSTRACT

Background: To date, few epidemiologic studies have examined the relationship between environmental PCDD/F exposure and breast cancer in human populations. Dioxin emissions from municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) are one of the major sources of environmental dioxins and are therefore an exposure source of public concern. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between dioxins emitted from a polluting MSWI and invasive breast cancer risk among women residing in the area under direct influence of the facility.

Methods: We compared 434 incident cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed between 1996 and 2002, and 2170 controls randomly selected from the 1999 population census. A validated dispersion model was used as a proxy for dioxin exposure, yielding four exposure categories. The latter were linked to individual places of residence, using Geographic Information System technology.

Results: The age distribution at diagnosis for all cases combined showed a bimodal pattern with incidence peaks near 50 and 70 years old. This prompted us to run models separately for women aged 20-59 years, and women aged 60 years or older. Among women younger than 60 years old, no increased or decreased risk was found for any dioxin exposure category. Conversely, women over 60 years old living in the highest exposed zone were 0.31 time less likely (95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.89) to develop invasive breast cancer.

Conclusion: Before speculating that this decreased risk reflects a dioxin anti-estrogenic activity with greater effect on late-onset acquired breast cancer, some residual confounding must be envisaged.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Modeled dioxin concentrations at the block level, on the North-East side of the municipal solid waste incinerator of Besançon, France.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 1: Modeled dioxin concentrations at the block level, on the North-East side of the municipal solid waste incinerator of Besançon, France.

Mentions: The respective contours of these modeled ground-level air concentrations (classified as very low, low, intermediate, and high) were digitized and contoured onto the surface of the map with geographic information system (GIS) tools. We then overlaid a map of blocks onto the digital dioxin concentration map to attribute a dioxin concentration category to each of the 590 northeast blocks (provided half or more of their area was within a given contour) (Figure 1). From their respective residence block, we then obtained a risk field classification for each cancer patient and control. Regarding socioeconomic characteristics defined at the block group level (education, occupational social class and household-based indicators), we have already shown that they did not vary with dioxin exposure category (Table 1) [17].


Dioxin emissions from a municipal solid waste incinerator and risk of invasive breast cancer: a population-based case-control study with GIS-derived exposure.

Viel JF, Clément MC, Hägi M, Grandjean S, Challier B, Danzon A - Int J Health Geogr (2008)

Modeled dioxin concentrations at the block level, on the North-East side of the municipal solid waste incinerator of Besançon, France.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2267447&req=5

Figure 1: Modeled dioxin concentrations at the block level, on the North-East side of the municipal solid waste incinerator of Besançon, France.
Mentions: The respective contours of these modeled ground-level air concentrations (classified as very low, low, intermediate, and high) were digitized and contoured onto the surface of the map with geographic information system (GIS) tools. We then overlaid a map of blocks onto the digital dioxin concentration map to attribute a dioxin concentration category to each of the 590 northeast blocks (provided half or more of their area was within a given contour) (Figure 1). From their respective residence block, we then obtained a risk field classification for each cancer patient and control. Regarding socioeconomic characteristics defined at the block group level (education, occupational social class and household-based indicators), we have already shown that they did not vary with dioxin exposure category (Table 1) [17].

Bottom Line: Among women younger than 60 years old, no increased or decreased risk was found for any dioxin exposure category.Conversely, women over 60 years old living in the highest exposed zone were 0.31 time less likely (95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.89) to develop invasive breast cancer.Before speculating that this decreased risk reflects a dioxin anti-estrogenic activity with greater effect on late-onset acquired breast cancer, some residual confounding must be envisaged.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CNRS no 6249 Chrono-Environment, Faculty of Medicine, 2, place Saint Jacques, 25030 Besançon cedex, France. jean-francois.viel@univ-fcomte.fr

ABSTRACT

Background: To date, few epidemiologic studies have examined the relationship between environmental PCDD/F exposure and breast cancer in human populations. Dioxin emissions from municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) are one of the major sources of environmental dioxins and are therefore an exposure source of public concern. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between dioxins emitted from a polluting MSWI and invasive breast cancer risk among women residing in the area under direct influence of the facility.

Methods: We compared 434 incident cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed between 1996 and 2002, and 2170 controls randomly selected from the 1999 population census. A validated dispersion model was used as a proxy for dioxin exposure, yielding four exposure categories. The latter were linked to individual places of residence, using Geographic Information System technology.

Results: The age distribution at diagnosis for all cases combined showed a bimodal pattern with incidence peaks near 50 and 70 years old. This prompted us to run models separately for women aged 20-59 years, and women aged 60 years or older. Among women younger than 60 years old, no increased or decreased risk was found for any dioxin exposure category. Conversely, women over 60 years old living in the highest exposed zone were 0.31 time less likely (95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.89) to develop invasive breast cancer.

Conclusion: Before speculating that this decreased risk reflects a dioxin anti-estrogenic activity with greater effect on late-onset acquired breast cancer, some residual confounding must be envisaged.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus