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Family history of cancer as a risk factor for second malignancies after Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Andersson A, Enblad G, Tavelin B, Björkholm M, Linderoth J, Lagerlöf I, Merup M, Sender M, Malmer B - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

Bottom Line: First-degree relatives (FDRs) to the HL patients and their malignancies were then ascertained together with their malignancies through the Multi-Generation Registry and SCR.The HL patient cohort was stratified on the number of FDRs with cancer, and standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) of developing SM were analysed.In the HL cohort, 781 SM were observed 1 year or longer after HL diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Sciences (Oncology), Umeå University Hospital, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden. anne.andersson@onkologi.umu.se

ABSTRACT
This study estimated the risk of second primary malignancies after Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in relation to family history of cancer, age at diagnosis and latency, among 6946 patients treated for HL in Sweden in 1965-1995 identified through the Swedish Cancer Register (SCR). First-degree relatives (FDRs) to the HL patients and their malignancies were then ascertained together with their malignancies through the Multi-Generation Registry and SCR. The HL patient cohort was stratified on the number of FDRs with cancer, and standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) of developing SM were analysed. In the HL cohort, 781 SM were observed 1 year or longer after HL diagnosis. The risk for developing SM increased with the number of FDRs with cancer, SIRs being 2.26, 3.01, and 3.45 with 0, 1, or >or=2 FDRs with cancer, respectively. Hodgkin's lymphoma long-term survivors treated at a young age with a family history of cancer carry an increased risk for developing SM and may represent a subgroup where standardised screening for the most common cancer sites could be offered in a stringent surveillance programme.

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Absolute and relative survival for HL patients treated before the age of 40 years between the years of 1965 and 1995 compared with the normal population in Sweden.
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fig1: Absolute and relative survival for HL patients treated before the age of 40 years between the years of 1965 and 1995 compared with the normal population in Sweden.

Mentions: Survival in HL patients treated for HL at 40 years or younger was decreased compared with the general Swedish population, and also 10 years or more after treatment (Figure 1). Even the relative survival – matched for age, sex, and year – was decreased. Of the 6946 HL patients, 4623 survived more than 1 year after diagnosis and of these 696 (15%) developed a total of 781 SMs. Solid tumours accounted for 645 (82.6%) of these and haematological malignancies for 136 (17.4%). The SIR for SM overall was significantly increased, at 2.62 (95% CI: 2.32–2.96) 10–19 years after HL diagnosis (Table 2). When stratified for age at HL diagnosis, incidence was especially increased among those diagnosed before the age of 40 years, SIR 4.34 (95% CI: 3.51–5.30).


Family history of cancer as a risk factor for second malignancies after Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Andersson A, Enblad G, Tavelin B, Björkholm M, Linderoth J, Lagerlöf I, Merup M, Sender M, Malmer B - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

Absolute and relative survival for HL patients treated before the age of 40 years between the years of 1965 and 1995 compared with the normal population in Sweden.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2266846&req=5

fig1: Absolute and relative survival for HL patients treated before the age of 40 years between the years of 1965 and 1995 compared with the normal population in Sweden.
Mentions: Survival in HL patients treated for HL at 40 years or younger was decreased compared with the general Swedish population, and also 10 years or more after treatment (Figure 1). Even the relative survival – matched for age, sex, and year – was decreased. Of the 6946 HL patients, 4623 survived more than 1 year after diagnosis and of these 696 (15%) developed a total of 781 SMs. Solid tumours accounted for 645 (82.6%) of these and haematological malignancies for 136 (17.4%). The SIR for SM overall was significantly increased, at 2.62 (95% CI: 2.32–2.96) 10–19 years after HL diagnosis (Table 2). When stratified for age at HL diagnosis, incidence was especially increased among those diagnosed before the age of 40 years, SIR 4.34 (95% CI: 3.51–5.30).

Bottom Line: First-degree relatives (FDRs) to the HL patients and their malignancies were then ascertained together with their malignancies through the Multi-Generation Registry and SCR.The HL patient cohort was stratified on the number of FDRs with cancer, and standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) of developing SM were analysed.In the HL cohort, 781 SM were observed 1 year or longer after HL diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Sciences (Oncology), Umeå University Hospital, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden. anne.andersson@onkologi.umu.se

ABSTRACT
This study estimated the risk of second primary malignancies after Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in relation to family history of cancer, age at diagnosis and latency, among 6946 patients treated for HL in Sweden in 1965-1995 identified through the Swedish Cancer Register (SCR). First-degree relatives (FDRs) to the HL patients and their malignancies were then ascertained together with their malignancies through the Multi-Generation Registry and SCR. The HL patient cohort was stratified on the number of FDRs with cancer, and standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) of developing SM were analysed. In the HL cohort, 781 SM were observed 1 year or longer after HL diagnosis. The risk for developing SM increased with the number of FDRs with cancer, SIRs being 2.26, 3.01, and 3.45 with 0, 1, or >or=2 FDRs with cancer, respectively. Hodgkin's lymphoma long-term survivors treated at a young age with a family history of cancer carry an increased risk for developing SM and may represent a subgroup where standardised screening for the most common cancer sites could be offered in a stringent surveillance programme.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus