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A concept for extending the applicability of constraint-induced movement therapy through motor cortex activity feedback using a neural prosthesis.

Ward TE, Soraghan CJ, Matthews F, Markham C - Comput Intell Neurosci (2007)

Bottom Line: Significant changes in such effort may be used to drive rehabilitative robotic actuators, for example.An introduction to the relevant haemodynamics is given including a description of the basic technology behind a suitable NIRS system.An illustration of the proposed therapy is described using a simple NIRS system driving a robotic arm during simple upper-limb unilateral isometric contraction exercises with healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electronic Engineering, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland. tomas.ward@eeng.nuim.ie

ABSTRACT
This paper describes a concept for the extension of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) through the use of feedback of primary motor cortex activity. CIMT requires residual movement to act as a source of feedback to the patient, thus preventing its application to those with no perceptible movement. It is proposed in this paper that it is possible to provide feedback of the motor cortex effort to the patient by measurement with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Significant changes in such effort may be used to drive rehabilitative robotic actuators, for example. This may provide a possible avenue for extending CIMT to patients hitherto excluded as a result of severity of condition. In support of such a paradigm, this paper details the current status of CIMT and related attempts to extend rehabilitation therapy through the application of technology. An introduction to the relevant haemodynamics is given including a description of the basic technology behind a suitable NIRS system. An illustration of the proposed therapy is described using a simple NIRS system driving a robotic arm during simple upper-limb unilateral isometric contraction exercises with healthy subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustrationof relative positioning of optode sources and detectors.
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fig2: Illustrationof relative positioning of optode sources and detectors.

Mentions: Each subject was seated in a near supine position toreduce the effects of low-frequency blood oscillations (Mayer wave) in a dimlylit room. The respiration monitoring device (Biopac-TSD201) was strappedaround the chest of each subject to monitor the respiratory signal duringtrials. The PPG probe (Biopac-TSD200) was attached to the index fingeron the inactive limb to monitor the cardiac pulse during trials. Subjects' headmeasurements were taken to locate positions and .These 10–20 system positions are approximately over primary motor cortexcentres in the brain responsible for right- and left-hand movements. Thedistance between the source and detector was 30 mm. A more precise positioningdescriptor is available using the optode placement system proposed in [45]. Using this system, theoptode location is described in terms of distance and angle with respect to adefined EEG 10–20 system landmark position which serves as an origin. In thisstudy, angles are referenced to Cz.This yields optode descriptors as in Table 1, illustrated in Figure 2.


A concept for extending the applicability of constraint-induced movement therapy through motor cortex activity feedback using a neural prosthesis.

Ward TE, Soraghan CJ, Matthews F, Markham C - Comput Intell Neurosci (2007)

Illustrationof relative positioning of optode sources and detectors.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2266825&req=5

fig2: Illustrationof relative positioning of optode sources and detectors.
Mentions: Each subject was seated in a near supine position toreduce the effects of low-frequency blood oscillations (Mayer wave) in a dimlylit room. The respiration monitoring device (Biopac-TSD201) was strappedaround the chest of each subject to monitor the respiratory signal duringtrials. The PPG probe (Biopac-TSD200) was attached to the index fingeron the inactive limb to monitor the cardiac pulse during trials. Subjects' headmeasurements were taken to locate positions and .These 10–20 system positions are approximately over primary motor cortexcentres in the brain responsible for right- and left-hand movements. Thedistance between the source and detector was 30 mm. A more precise positioningdescriptor is available using the optode placement system proposed in [45]. Using this system, theoptode location is described in terms of distance and angle with respect to adefined EEG 10–20 system landmark position which serves as an origin. In thisstudy, angles are referenced to Cz.This yields optode descriptors as in Table 1, illustrated in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Significant changes in such effort may be used to drive rehabilitative robotic actuators, for example.An introduction to the relevant haemodynamics is given including a description of the basic technology behind a suitable NIRS system.An illustration of the proposed therapy is described using a simple NIRS system driving a robotic arm during simple upper-limb unilateral isometric contraction exercises with healthy subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electronic Engineering, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland. tomas.ward@eeng.nuim.ie

ABSTRACT
This paper describes a concept for the extension of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) through the use of feedback of primary motor cortex activity. CIMT requires residual movement to act as a source of feedback to the patient, thus preventing its application to those with no perceptible movement. It is proposed in this paper that it is possible to provide feedback of the motor cortex effort to the patient by measurement with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Significant changes in such effort may be used to drive rehabilitative robotic actuators, for example. This may provide a possible avenue for extending CIMT to patients hitherto excluded as a result of severity of condition. In support of such a paradigm, this paper details the current status of CIMT and related attempts to extend rehabilitation therapy through the application of technology. An introduction to the relevant haemodynamics is given including a description of the basic technology behind a suitable NIRS system. An illustration of the proposed therapy is described using a simple NIRS system driving a robotic arm during simple upper-limb unilateral isometric contraction exercises with healthy subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus