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A concept for extending the applicability of constraint-induced movement therapy through motor cortex activity feedback using a neural prosthesis.

Ward TE, Soraghan CJ, Matthews F, Markham C - Comput Intell Neurosci (2007)

Bottom Line: This may provide a possible avenue for extending CIMT to patients hitherto excluded as a result of severity of condition.In support of such a paradigm, this paper details the current status of CIMT and related attempts to extend rehabilitation therapy through the application of technology.An introduction to the relevant haemodynamics is given including a description of the basic technology behind a suitable NIRS system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electronic Engineering, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland. tomas.ward@eeng.nuim.ie

ABSTRACT
This paper describes a concept for the extension of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) through the use of feedback of primary motor cortex activity. CIMT requires residual movement to act as a source of feedback to the patient, thus preventing its application to those with no perceptible movement. It is proposed in this paper that it is possible to provide feedback of the motor cortex effort to the patient by measurement with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Significant changes in such effort may be used to drive rehabilitative robotic actuators, for example. This may provide a possible avenue for extending CIMT to patients hitherto excluded as a result of severity of condition. In support of such a paradigm, this paper details the current status of CIMT and related attempts to extend rehabilitation therapy through the application of technology. An introduction to the relevant haemodynamics is given including a description of the basic technology behind a suitable NIRS system. An illustration of the proposed therapy is described using a simple NIRS system driving a robotic arm during simple upper-limb unilateral isometric contraction exercises with healthy subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The Armdroid-1 robotic arm used in the feedback protocol.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: The Armdroid-1 robotic arm used in the feedback protocol.

Mentions: Feedback was provided through movement of a roboticarm (Figure 1) in sympathy with sustained elevation in HbO levels during themotor execution tasks. The outputs of the lock-in amplifiers was tapped toprovide drive signals via a simple 12-bit National Instruments USB-6008 DAQ at 10 samples per second. Online and real-time processings for Hb and HbOusing standard algorithms [43] based on (2) provided control of the robotic arm and feedback. Therobotic arm was driven using control signals from the DAQ system allowingpredetermined movement patterns to be invoked when haemodynamic activityexceeded rest period levels.


A concept for extending the applicability of constraint-induced movement therapy through motor cortex activity feedback using a neural prosthesis.

Ward TE, Soraghan CJ, Matthews F, Markham C - Comput Intell Neurosci (2007)

The Armdroid-1 robotic arm used in the feedback protocol.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2266825&req=5

fig1: The Armdroid-1 robotic arm used in the feedback protocol.
Mentions: Feedback was provided through movement of a roboticarm (Figure 1) in sympathy with sustained elevation in HbO levels during themotor execution tasks. The outputs of the lock-in amplifiers was tapped toprovide drive signals via a simple 12-bit National Instruments USB-6008 DAQ at 10 samples per second. Online and real-time processings for Hb and HbOusing standard algorithms [43] based on (2) provided control of the robotic arm and feedback. Therobotic arm was driven using control signals from the DAQ system allowingpredetermined movement patterns to be invoked when haemodynamic activityexceeded rest period levels.

Bottom Line: This may provide a possible avenue for extending CIMT to patients hitherto excluded as a result of severity of condition.In support of such a paradigm, this paper details the current status of CIMT and related attempts to extend rehabilitation therapy through the application of technology.An introduction to the relevant haemodynamics is given including a description of the basic technology behind a suitable NIRS system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electronic Engineering, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland. tomas.ward@eeng.nuim.ie

ABSTRACT
This paper describes a concept for the extension of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) through the use of feedback of primary motor cortex activity. CIMT requires residual movement to act as a source of feedback to the patient, thus preventing its application to those with no perceptible movement. It is proposed in this paper that it is possible to provide feedback of the motor cortex effort to the patient by measurement with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Significant changes in such effort may be used to drive rehabilitative robotic actuators, for example. This may provide a possible avenue for extending CIMT to patients hitherto excluded as a result of severity of condition. In support of such a paradigm, this paper details the current status of CIMT and related attempts to extend rehabilitation therapy through the application of technology. An introduction to the relevant haemodynamics is given including a description of the basic technology behind a suitable NIRS system. An illustration of the proposed therapy is described using a simple NIRS system driving a robotic arm during simple upper-limb unilateral isometric contraction exercises with healthy subjects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus