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Ancient DNA elucidates the controversy about the flightless island hens (Gallinula sp.) of Tristan da Cunha.

Groenenberg DS, Beintema AJ, Dekker RW, Gittenberger E - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: Others suppose that it still inhabits Tristan.There is no consensus about Gallinula comeri, the name introduced for the flightless moorhen from the nearby island of Gough.This study confirms that among gallinules seemingly radical adaptations (such as the loss of flight) can readily evolve in parallel on different islands, while conspicuous changes in other morphological characters fail to occur.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Museum of Natural History Naturalis, Leiden, The Netherlands. groenenberg@naturalis.nl

ABSTRACT
A persistent controversy surrounds the flightless island hen of Tristan da Cunha, Gallinula nesiotis. Some believe that it became extinct by the end of the 19th century. Others suppose that it still inhabits Tristan. There is no consensus about Gallinula comeri, the name introduced for the flightless moorhen from the nearby island of Gough. On the basis of DNA sequencing of both recently collected and historical material, we conclude that G. nesiotis and G. comeri are different taxa, that G. nesiotis indeed became extinct, and that G. comeri now inhabits both islands. This study confirms that among gallinules seemingly radical adaptations (such as the loss of flight) can readily evolve in parallel on different islands, while conspicuous changes in other morphological characters fail to occur.

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Bootstrap 50% majority rule consesus NJ tree.Values indicate bootstrap support.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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pone-0001835-g003: Bootstrap 50% majority rule consesus NJ tree.Values indicate bootstrap support.

Mentions: The results of phylogenetic analyses (Neighbour-Joining, Maximum Likelihood and Bayes) based on a combined dataset (all taxa, all regions, Dataset S4) are shown in Fig. 3–5. In these cladograms Gallinula nesiotis and G. comeri form a clade with the moorhens of Africa/Eurasia, whereas the other taxa that were investigated are less closely related.


Ancient DNA elucidates the controversy about the flightless island hens (Gallinula sp.) of Tristan da Cunha.

Groenenberg DS, Beintema AJ, Dekker RW, Gittenberger E - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bootstrap 50% majority rule consesus NJ tree.Values indicate bootstrap support.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2266797&req=5

pone-0001835-g003: Bootstrap 50% majority rule consesus NJ tree.Values indicate bootstrap support.
Mentions: The results of phylogenetic analyses (Neighbour-Joining, Maximum Likelihood and Bayes) based on a combined dataset (all taxa, all regions, Dataset S4) are shown in Fig. 3–5. In these cladograms Gallinula nesiotis and G. comeri form a clade with the moorhens of Africa/Eurasia, whereas the other taxa that were investigated are less closely related.

Bottom Line: Others suppose that it still inhabits Tristan.There is no consensus about Gallinula comeri, the name introduced for the flightless moorhen from the nearby island of Gough.This study confirms that among gallinules seemingly radical adaptations (such as the loss of flight) can readily evolve in parallel on different islands, while conspicuous changes in other morphological characters fail to occur.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Museum of Natural History Naturalis, Leiden, The Netherlands. groenenberg@naturalis.nl

ABSTRACT
A persistent controversy surrounds the flightless island hen of Tristan da Cunha, Gallinula nesiotis. Some believe that it became extinct by the end of the 19th century. Others suppose that it still inhabits Tristan. There is no consensus about Gallinula comeri, the name introduced for the flightless moorhen from the nearby island of Gough. On the basis of DNA sequencing of both recently collected and historical material, we conclude that G. nesiotis and G. comeri are different taxa, that G. nesiotis indeed became extinct, and that G. comeri now inhabits both islands. This study confirms that among gallinules seemingly radical adaptations (such as the loss of flight) can readily evolve in parallel on different islands, while conspicuous changes in other morphological characters fail to occur.

Show MeSH