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The effects of cognitive-behavioural therapy on mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents.

Wilkinson PO, Goodyer IM - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2008)

Bottom Line: There were significantly greater reductions in ruminations in the CBT group compared to the non-CBT group (p = .002).There was no significant difference in the reduction in self-reported depressive symptoms between the groups.This may reduce the risk of future relapse.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. pow@fsmail.net

ABSTRACT

Background: A mood-related ruminative response style increases the risk of onset and persistence of depression. This preliminary study investigated whether, in depressed adolescents, cognitive-behaviour therapy reduces mood-related ruminative response style. Whether specific factors within the rumination scale were differentially affected by CBT is also reported.

Methods: 26 depressed adolescents were randomised to receiving serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRI) plus psychosocial treatment as usual or SSRI and psychosocial treatment as usual plus CBT. Ruminative response style and depressive symptoms were measured at baseline and after 30 weeks of treatment, with the Responses to Depression Questionnaire and Mood and Feelings Questionnaire.

Results: There were significantly greater reductions in ruminations in the CBT group compared to the non-CBT group (p = .002). There was no significant difference in the reduction in self-reported depressive symptoms between the groups. Rumination was reduced to levels of never-depressed controls in adolescents who had recovered from depression and received CBT. There were greater falls in the CBT group in the more pathological 'brooding' factor of rumination.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that adding CBT to SSRI medication in the presence of active clinical care causes a greater reduction in mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents. This may reduce the risk of future relapse.

Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCNT83809224.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Primary outcome measures at baseline and follow-up for depressed groups and controls. Note: Controls were only measured at baseline. A straight line at this baseline value was drawn for illustrative purposes. TAU = group allocated to SSRI and treatment as usual; CBT = group allocated to SSRI and CBT. RDQ = Responses to Depression Questionnaire; MFQ = Mood and Feelings Questionnaire.
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Figure 1: Primary outcome measures at baseline and follow-up for depressed groups and controls. Note: Controls were only measured at baseline. A straight line at this baseline value was drawn for illustrative purposes. TAU = group allocated to SSRI and treatment as usual; CBT = group allocated to SSRI and CBT. RDQ = Responses to Depression Questionnaire; MFQ = Mood and Feelings Questionnaire.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the scores on the primary outcome variables and MFQ in the two depressed groups at both time points, together with the control group single score. Mean (standard deviation) scores at follow-up for the TAU and CBT groups respectively were: ruminations: 25.0 (14.7) and 13.5 (9.5); MFQ: 19.3 (23.8) and 16.2 (14.3).


The effects of cognitive-behavioural therapy on mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents.

Wilkinson PO, Goodyer IM - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2008)

Primary outcome measures at baseline and follow-up for depressed groups and controls. Note: Controls were only measured at baseline. A straight line at this baseline value was drawn for illustrative purposes. TAU = group allocated to SSRI and treatment as usual; CBT = group allocated to SSRI and CBT. RDQ = Responses to Depression Questionnaire; MFQ = Mood and Feelings Questionnaire.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2266703&req=5

Figure 1: Primary outcome measures at baseline and follow-up for depressed groups and controls. Note: Controls were only measured at baseline. A straight line at this baseline value was drawn for illustrative purposes. TAU = group allocated to SSRI and treatment as usual; CBT = group allocated to SSRI and CBT. RDQ = Responses to Depression Questionnaire; MFQ = Mood and Feelings Questionnaire.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the scores on the primary outcome variables and MFQ in the two depressed groups at both time points, together with the control group single score. Mean (standard deviation) scores at follow-up for the TAU and CBT groups respectively were: ruminations: 25.0 (14.7) and 13.5 (9.5); MFQ: 19.3 (23.8) and 16.2 (14.3).

Bottom Line: There were significantly greater reductions in ruminations in the CBT group compared to the non-CBT group (p = .002).There was no significant difference in the reduction in self-reported depressive symptoms between the groups.This may reduce the risk of future relapse.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. pow@fsmail.net

ABSTRACT

Background: A mood-related ruminative response style increases the risk of onset and persistence of depression. This preliminary study investigated whether, in depressed adolescents, cognitive-behaviour therapy reduces mood-related ruminative response style. Whether specific factors within the rumination scale were differentially affected by CBT is also reported.

Methods: 26 depressed adolescents were randomised to receiving serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRI) plus psychosocial treatment as usual or SSRI and psychosocial treatment as usual plus CBT. Ruminative response style and depressive symptoms were measured at baseline and after 30 weeks of treatment, with the Responses to Depression Questionnaire and Mood and Feelings Questionnaire.

Results: There were significantly greater reductions in ruminations in the CBT group compared to the non-CBT group (p = .002). There was no significant difference in the reduction in self-reported depressive symptoms between the groups. Rumination was reduced to levels of never-depressed controls in adolescents who had recovered from depression and received CBT. There were greater falls in the CBT group in the more pathological 'brooding' factor of rumination.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that adding CBT to SSRI medication in the presence of active clinical care causes a greater reduction in mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents. This may reduce the risk of future relapse.

Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCNT83809224.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus