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Is there a body of evidence for the treatment of patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS)?

Weiss HR - Scoliosis (2007)

Bottom Line: While there is evidence in the form of prospective controlled studies that Scoliosis Intensive Rehabilitation (SIR) and braces can alter the natural history of the condition, there is no prospective controlled study comparing the natural history with surgical treatment.One aim of the Scoliosis Society (SOSORT) should be; to help develop a body of research regarding the outcomes of conservative and operative treatment as well, and to highlight the problems of treatment indications in patients with AIS and other spinal deformities.Another aim is to help to improve the safety of patients who have surgery.By producing evidence-based information that can be used to develop guidelines that could aid both professionals and patients in making decisions about surgical and conservative options.Although 'Scoliosis' is the official journal of the SOSORT and is the main forum for experts in the field of conservative management of patients with spinal deformities, there needs to be more wide spread attempt to develop a fuller body of evidence focussing on spine surgery as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Asklepios Katharina Schroth, Spinal Deformities Rehabilitation Centre, Korczakstrasse 2, D-55566 Bad Sobernheim, Germany. hr.weiss@asklepios.com.

ABSTRACT
Historically, the treatment options for AIS, the most common form of scoliosis are; exercises; in-patient rehabilitation; braces and surgery. While there is evidence in the form of prospective controlled studies that Scoliosis Intensive Rehabilitation (SIR) and braces can alter the natural history of the condition, there is no prospective controlled study comparing the natural history with surgical treatment.One aim of the Scoliosis Society (SOSORT) should be; to help develop a body of research regarding the outcomes of conservative and operative treatment as well, and to highlight the problems of treatment indications in patients with AIS and other spinal deformities. Another aim is to help to improve the safety of patients who have surgery. By producing evidence-based information that can be used to develop guidelines that could aid both professionals and patients in making decisions about surgical and conservative options.Although 'Scoliosis' is the official journal of the SOSORT and is the main forum for experts in the field of conservative management of patients with spinal deformities, there needs to be more wide spread attempt to develop a fuller body of evidence focussing on spine surgery as well.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

After surgery there is still a significant rib-hump visible.
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Figure 4: After surgery there is still a significant rib-hump visible.

Mentions: One might assume that the main benefit of surgery is correction. But when one realises that primary correction effects are not necessarily stable after surgery [30-40], not even in the first year and that neither back shape nor self esteem have been corrected to a satisfactory level by the surgical intervention [41] and that a balanced appearance of a patient is not necessarily the outcome of surgical intervention (Fig. 3 and 4), a more scientific basis remains to be desired on the true outcome after surgery.


Is there a body of evidence for the treatment of patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS)?

Weiss HR - Scoliosis (2007)

After surgery there is still a significant rib-hump visible.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2266701&req=5

Figure 4: After surgery there is still a significant rib-hump visible.
Mentions: One might assume that the main benefit of surgery is correction. But when one realises that primary correction effects are not necessarily stable after surgery [30-40], not even in the first year and that neither back shape nor self esteem have been corrected to a satisfactory level by the surgical intervention [41] and that a balanced appearance of a patient is not necessarily the outcome of surgical intervention (Fig. 3 and 4), a more scientific basis remains to be desired on the true outcome after surgery.

Bottom Line: While there is evidence in the form of prospective controlled studies that Scoliosis Intensive Rehabilitation (SIR) and braces can alter the natural history of the condition, there is no prospective controlled study comparing the natural history with surgical treatment.One aim of the Scoliosis Society (SOSORT) should be; to help develop a body of research regarding the outcomes of conservative and operative treatment as well, and to highlight the problems of treatment indications in patients with AIS and other spinal deformities.Another aim is to help to improve the safety of patients who have surgery.By producing evidence-based information that can be used to develop guidelines that could aid both professionals and patients in making decisions about surgical and conservative options.Although 'Scoliosis' is the official journal of the SOSORT and is the main forum for experts in the field of conservative management of patients with spinal deformities, there needs to be more wide spread attempt to develop a fuller body of evidence focussing on spine surgery as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Asklepios Katharina Schroth, Spinal Deformities Rehabilitation Centre, Korczakstrasse 2, D-55566 Bad Sobernheim, Germany. hr.weiss@asklepios.com.

ABSTRACT
Historically, the treatment options for AIS, the most common form of scoliosis are; exercises; in-patient rehabilitation; braces and surgery. While there is evidence in the form of prospective controlled studies that Scoliosis Intensive Rehabilitation (SIR) and braces can alter the natural history of the condition, there is no prospective controlled study comparing the natural history with surgical treatment.One aim of the Scoliosis Society (SOSORT) should be; to help develop a body of research regarding the outcomes of conservative and operative treatment as well, and to highlight the problems of treatment indications in patients with AIS and other spinal deformities. Another aim is to help to improve the safety of patients who have surgery. By producing evidence-based information that can be used to develop guidelines that could aid both professionals and patients in making decisions about surgical and conservative options.Although 'Scoliosis' is the official journal of the SOSORT and is the main forum for experts in the field of conservative management of patients with spinal deformities, there needs to be more wide spread attempt to develop a fuller body of evidence focussing on spine surgery as well.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus