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Moderate size infantile haemangioma of the neck -- conservative or surgical treatment? : a case report.

Hussain A, Mahmood H, Almusawy H - J Med Case Rep (2008)

Bottom Line: Surgical excision was performed successfully without major morbidity.Partial necrosis of the skin flap developed shortly after the operation but healing was complete in eight weeks.This approach will prevent growth deformation, impact on nearby vital organs and psychological problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: General surgery department, Princess Royal University Hospital, Kent, UK. azahrahussain@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Infantile haemangioma is the commonest benign tumour in infancy. While the management of the majority of small haemangiomas consists of simply watching or steroid treatment, giant and moderate size infantile haemangiomas are challenging problems, especially in health systems with limited resources in developing countries.

Case presentation: A one-year old boy was presented to us by his parents with a moderate size haemangioma on the posterior triangle of the left side of the neck. Clinical assessment and radiological examinations were helpful in confirming the diagnosis. Surgical excision was performed successfully without major morbidity. Partial necrosis of the skin flap developed shortly after the operation but healing was complete in eight weeks. There was no residual problem on review five years after the operation.

Conclusion: Early surgical excision of a moderate size infantile haemangioma may be justified especially when there is difficulty of follow-up, which can be a common problem in developing countries. This approach will prevent growth deformation, impact on nearby vital organs and psychological problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anterolateral preoperative view.
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Figure 1: Anterolateral preoperative view.

Mentions: Examination confirmed a 7 × 10 cm vascular tumour at the posterior triangle of the neck on the left side(see figure 1, 2). Full blood count, biochemistry, chest and neck X-rays were reported as normal apart from the soft tissue mass on the left side of the neck.


Moderate size infantile haemangioma of the neck -- conservative or surgical treatment? : a case report.

Hussain A, Mahmood H, Almusawy H - J Med Case Rep (2008)

Anterolateral preoperative view.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2265728&req=5

Figure 1: Anterolateral preoperative view.
Mentions: Examination confirmed a 7 × 10 cm vascular tumour at the posterior triangle of the neck on the left side(see figure 1, 2). Full blood count, biochemistry, chest and neck X-rays were reported as normal apart from the soft tissue mass on the left side of the neck.

Bottom Line: Surgical excision was performed successfully without major morbidity.Partial necrosis of the skin flap developed shortly after the operation but healing was complete in eight weeks.This approach will prevent growth deformation, impact on nearby vital organs and psychological problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: General surgery department, Princess Royal University Hospital, Kent, UK. azahrahussain@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Infantile haemangioma is the commonest benign tumour in infancy. While the management of the majority of small haemangiomas consists of simply watching or steroid treatment, giant and moderate size infantile haemangiomas are challenging problems, especially in health systems with limited resources in developing countries.

Case presentation: A one-year old boy was presented to us by his parents with a moderate size haemangioma on the posterior triangle of the left side of the neck. Clinical assessment and radiological examinations were helpful in confirming the diagnosis. Surgical excision was performed successfully without major morbidity. Partial necrosis of the skin flap developed shortly after the operation but healing was complete in eight weeks. There was no residual problem on review five years after the operation.

Conclusion: Early surgical excision of a moderate size infantile haemangioma may be justified especially when there is difficulty of follow-up, which can be a common problem in developing countries. This approach will prevent growth deformation, impact on nearby vital organs and psychological problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus