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Uncomplicated obesity is associated with abnormal aortic function assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

Robinson MR, Scheuermann-Freestone M, Leeson P, Channon KM, Clarke K, Neubauer S, Wiesmann F - J Cardiovasc Magn Reson (2008)

Bottom Line: Body mass index and fat mass were negatively correlated with aortic function.In multiple regression models, fat mass, leptin and body mass index were independent predictors of aortic function.Aortic elastic function is abnormal in obese subjects without other cardiovascular risk factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research (OCMR), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. monique.robinson@cardiov.ox.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Aims: Obese subjects with insulin resistance and hypertension have abnormal aortic elastic function, which may predispose them to the development of left ventricular dysfunction. We hypothesised that obesity, uncomplicated by other cardiovascular risk factors, is independently associated with aortic function.

Methods and results: We used magnetic resonance imaging to measure aortic compliance, distensibility and stiffness index in 27 obese subjects (BMI 33 kg/m2) without insulin resistance and with normal cholesterol and blood pressure, and 12 controls (BMI 23 kg/m2). Obesity was associated with reduced aortic compliance (0.9 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.2 mm2/mmHg in controls, p < 0.02) and distensibility (3.3 +/- 0.01 vs. 5.6 +/- 0.01 mmHg-1 x 10-3, p < 0.02), as well as higher stiffness index (3.4 +/- 0.3 vs. 2.1 +/- 0.1, p < 0.02). Body mass index and fat mass were negatively correlated with aortic function. Leptin was higher in obesity (8.9 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.7 +/- 0.6 ng/ml, p < 0.001) and also correlated with aortic measures. In multiple regression models, fat mass, leptin and body mass index were independent predictors of aortic function.

Conclusion: Aortic elastic function is abnormal in obese subjects without other cardiovascular risk factors. These findings highlight the independent importance of obesity in the development of cardiovascular disease.

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Mean aortic compliance had a negative correlation with (a) body mass index (BMI), (b) fat mass and (c) leptin.
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Figure 2: Mean aortic compliance had a negative correlation with (a) body mass index (BMI), (b) fat mass and (c) leptin.

Mentions: Conventional indicators of obesity were significantly correlated with aortic function. Mean aortic compliance in the obese was 40% lower (0.99 ± 0.11 vs. 1.45 ± 0.15 mm2/mmHg, p = 0.021) and distensibility 59% lower (3.3 ± 0.004 vs. 5.6 ± 0.001 mmHg-1 × 10-3, p = 0.023). Compliance showed significant negative correlations with BMI (r = -0.48 p = 0.003), fat mass (r = -0.55, p = 0.001), and leptin (r = -0.47, p = 0.005) (Figure 2) and significant positive correlations with HDL (r = 0.66, p < 0.001). Aortic distensibility correlated negatively with BMI (r = -0.51, p = 0.002) (Figure 3a), and fat mass (r = -0.58, p < 0.001) (Figure 3b). HDL showed a significant positive correlation with distensibility (r = 0.47, p = 0.008).


Uncomplicated obesity is associated with abnormal aortic function assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

Robinson MR, Scheuermann-Freestone M, Leeson P, Channon KM, Clarke K, Neubauer S, Wiesmann F - J Cardiovasc Magn Reson (2008)

Mean aortic compliance had a negative correlation with (a) body mass index (BMI), (b) fat mass and (c) leptin.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2265704&req=5

Figure 2: Mean aortic compliance had a negative correlation with (a) body mass index (BMI), (b) fat mass and (c) leptin.
Mentions: Conventional indicators of obesity were significantly correlated with aortic function. Mean aortic compliance in the obese was 40% lower (0.99 ± 0.11 vs. 1.45 ± 0.15 mm2/mmHg, p = 0.021) and distensibility 59% lower (3.3 ± 0.004 vs. 5.6 ± 0.001 mmHg-1 × 10-3, p = 0.023). Compliance showed significant negative correlations with BMI (r = -0.48 p = 0.003), fat mass (r = -0.55, p = 0.001), and leptin (r = -0.47, p = 0.005) (Figure 2) and significant positive correlations with HDL (r = 0.66, p < 0.001). Aortic distensibility correlated negatively with BMI (r = -0.51, p = 0.002) (Figure 3a), and fat mass (r = -0.58, p < 0.001) (Figure 3b). HDL showed a significant positive correlation with distensibility (r = 0.47, p = 0.008).

Bottom Line: Body mass index and fat mass were negatively correlated with aortic function.In multiple regression models, fat mass, leptin and body mass index were independent predictors of aortic function.Aortic elastic function is abnormal in obese subjects without other cardiovascular risk factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research (OCMR), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. monique.robinson@cardiov.ox.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Aims: Obese subjects with insulin resistance and hypertension have abnormal aortic elastic function, which may predispose them to the development of left ventricular dysfunction. We hypothesised that obesity, uncomplicated by other cardiovascular risk factors, is independently associated with aortic function.

Methods and results: We used magnetic resonance imaging to measure aortic compliance, distensibility and stiffness index in 27 obese subjects (BMI 33 kg/m2) without insulin resistance and with normal cholesterol and blood pressure, and 12 controls (BMI 23 kg/m2). Obesity was associated with reduced aortic compliance (0.9 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.2 mm2/mmHg in controls, p < 0.02) and distensibility (3.3 +/- 0.01 vs. 5.6 +/- 0.01 mmHg-1 x 10-3, p < 0.02), as well as higher stiffness index (3.4 +/- 0.3 vs. 2.1 +/- 0.1, p < 0.02). Body mass index and fat mass were negatively correlated with aortic function. Leptin was higher in obesity (8.9 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.7 +/- 0.6 ng/ml, p < 0.001) and also correlated with aortic measures. In multiple regression models, fat mass, leptin and body mass index were independent predictors of aortic function.

Conclusion: Aortic elastic function is abnormal in obese subjects without other cardiovascular risk factors. These findings highlight the independent importance of obesity in the development of cardiovascular disease.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus