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Seeing is believing: an educational outreach activity on disinfection practices.

Mercure SA, Tetu I, Lamonde S, Cote F, Guides de rue working gro - Harm Reduct J (2008)

Bottom Line: They saw microscopic objects, found out about the high prevalence of microbes in their environment and on their skin, and could appreciate the efficiency of different washing and disinfection techniques.Furthermore, they shared their newfound knowledge and began enforcing its application among people they inject drugs with.Most participants greatly appreciated this activity and valued it as being highly efficient and tangible.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculté des Sciences infirmières, Université Laval, Pavillon Agathe-Lacerte, Québec (Qc), Canada. sarah-amelie.mercure.1@ulaval.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Skin and soft-tissue infections are very common among persons who inject drugs. They occur when microbes pass under the protective layer of the skin and proliferate. This happens when harm reduction recommendations such as skin aseptia before injection and sterile injection equipment usage are not properly followed.

Methods: A group of active drug users involved in a health promotion project as peer educators were asked about their formation needs. To address their inquiries concerning skin and soft-tissue infections, we devised with them a series of workshops touching upon common infections, the microflora, and microbial transmission.

Results: Participants learned to identify common infections and how to properly react in case of an abscess, cellulitis or phlebitis. They saw microscopic objects, found out about the high prevalence of microbes in their environment and on their skin, and could appreciate the efficiency of different washing and disinfection techniques. They visualized how easily microbes can spread from person to person and from contaminated objects to persons.

Conclusion: In the weeks following this activity, some participants demonstrated and reported healthy behavioural changes regarding their own injection practices. Furthermore, they shared their newfound knowledge and began enforcing its application among people they inject drugs with. Most participants greatly appreciated this activity and valued it as being highly efficient and tangible. Note: A French version of this paper is available on the Journal's web site [see Additional file 1].

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Microbes of the skin. Agar plates were inoculated with participants' thumb i) before washing it, ii) after washing it with antibiotic soap and warm water for 30 seconds, and iii) after rubbing with an alcohol swab. A) A plate where alcohol was used efficiently. B) Box plots showing microbial abundance computed as a categorical score (3:>300 colonies, 2:50–300 colonies, 1:<50 colonies). Abundance did not significantly differ after washing with soap (p = 0.13), and was reduced by alcohol rubbing following hand washing (p = 0.03). C) Microbial diversity expressed as the number of visually differing colonies. Diversity did not significantly differ after washing with soap (p = 0.16), and was reduced by alcohol rubbing following hand washing (p = 0.02).
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Figure 1: Microbes of the skin. Agar plates were inoculated with participants' thumb i) before washing it, ii) after washing it with antibiotic soap and warm water for 30 seconds, and iii) after rubbing with an alcohol swab. A) A plate where alcohol was used efficiently. B) Box plots showing microbial abundance computed as a categorical score (3:>300 colonies, 2:50–300 colonies, 1:<50 colonies). Abundance did not significantly differ after washing with soap (p = 0.13), and was reduced by alcohol rubbing following hand washing (p = 0.03). C) Microbial diversity expressed as the number of visually differing colonies. Diversity did not significantly differ after washing with soap (p = 0.16), and was reduced by alcohol rubbing following hand washing (p = 0.02).

Mentions: Bacterial growth was noted on all plates inoculated with unwashed and washed hands, and on eight out of eleven plates inoculated with alcohol-rubbed fingers (Fig. 1A). In our experimental conditions, casual hand washing with antibiotic soap and warm water did not significantly reduce bacterial abundance and diversity (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p > 0.13), whereas rubbing fingers with an alcohol swab after washing them with soap significantly reduced both bacterial growth and diversity (p < 0.03) (Fig. 1B,C). After this workshop, participants rated their knowledge about alcohol action on microflora as better (n = 1) or much better (n = 10) than before the activity.


Seeing is believing: an educational outreach activity on disinfection practices.

Mercure SA, Tetu I, Lamonde S, Cote F, Guides de rue working gro - Harm Reduct J (2008)

Microbes of the skin. Agar plates were inoculated with participants' thumb i) before washing it, ii) after washing it with antibiotic soap and warm water for 30 seconds, and iii) after rubbing with an alcohol swab. A) A plate where alcohol was used efficiently. B) Box plots showing microbial abundance computed as a categorical score (3:>300 colonies, 2:50–300 colonies, 1:<50 colonies). Abundance did not significantly differ after washing with soap (p = 0.13), and was reduced by alcohol rubbing following hand washing (p = 0.03). C) Microbial diversity expressed as the number of visually differing colonies. Diversity did not significantly differ after washing with soap (p = 0.16), and was reduced by alcohol rubbing following hand washing (p = 0.02).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2265699&req=5

Figure 1: Microbes of the skin. Agar plates were inoculated with participants' thumb i) before washing it, ii) after washing it with antibiotic soap and warm water for 30 seconds, and iii) after rubbing with an alcohol swab. A) A plate where alcohol was used efficiently. B) Box plots showing microbial abundance computed as a categorical score (3:>300 colonies, 2:50–300 colonies, 1:<50 colonies). Abundance did not significantly differ after washing with soap (p = 0.13), and was reduced by alcohol rubbing following hand washing (p = 0.03). C) Microbial diversity expressed as the number of visually differing colonies. Diversity did not significantly differ after washing with soap (p = 0.16), and was reduced by alcohol rubbing following hand washing (p = 0.02).
Mentions: Bacterial growth was noted on all plates inoculated with unwashed and washed hands, and on eight out of eleven plates inoculated with alcohol-rubbed fingers (Fig. 1A). In our experimental conditions, casual hand washing with antibiotic soap and warm water did not significantly reduce bacterial abundance and diversity (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p > 0.13), whereas rubbing fingers with an alcohol swab after washing them with soap significantly reduced both bacterial growth and diversity (p < 0.03) (Fig. 1B,C). After this workshop, participants rated their knowledge about alcohol action on microflora as better (n = 1) or much better (n = 10) than before the activity.

Bottom Line: They saw microscopic objects, found out about the high prevalence of microbes in their environment and on their skin, and could appreciate the efficiency of different washing and disinfection techniques.Furthermore, they shared their newfound knowledge and began enforcing its application among people they inject drugs with.Most participants greatly appreciated this activity and valued it as being highly efficient and tangible.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculté des Sciences infirmières, Université Laval, Pavillon Agathe-Lacerte, Québec (Qc), Canada. sarah-amelie.mercure.1@ulaval.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Skin and soft-tissue infections are very common among persons who inject drugs. They occur when microbes pass under the protective layer of the skin and proliferate. This happens when harm reduction recommendations such as skin aseptia before injection and sterile injection equipment usage are not properly followed.

Methods: A group of active drug users involved in a health promotion project as peer educators were asked about their formation needs. To address their inquiries concerning skin and soft-tissue infections, we devised with them a series of workshops touching upon common infections, the microflora, and microbial transmission.

Results: Participants learned to identify common infections and how to properly react in case of an abscess, cellulitis or phlebitis. They saw microscopic objects, found out about the high prevalence of microbes in their environment and on their skin, and could appreciate the efficiency of different washing and disinfection techniques. They visualized how easily microbes can spread from person to person and from contaminated objects to persons.

Conclusion: In the weeks following this activity, some participants demonstrated and reported healthy behavioural changes regarding their own injection practices. Furthermore, they shared their newfound knowledge and began enforcing its application among people they inject drugs with. Most participants greatly appreciated this activity and valued it as being highly efficient and tangible. Note: A French version of this paper is available on the Journal's web site [see Additional file 1].

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus