Limits...
Actin and microtubules interact via MAPs

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

There were “plenty of examples in electron micrographs where microtubule and actin filaments were in the same place in the cell,” says Thomas Pollard (Yale University, New Haven, CT)... But, he notes, no one had investigated whether the polymer filaments actually interacted with each other and, if so, by what molecular connections... The two used a rather low-tech viscometer that measured a ball bearing's rate of fall through a capillary tube filled with actin filaments and microtubules (Griffith and Pollard, 1978)... When they added purified tubulin and actin to the tube and allowed filaments to polymerize, the viscosity was similar to the sum of the filaments' individual viscosities... But when microtubules were purified with their microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), the viscosity of the mixture with actin jumped 120-fold... The experiments argued heavily for MAP-mediated cross-linking of microtubules and actin filaments... The paper was one of the first to assign a molecular role to the MAPs beyond promoting microtubule polymerization... A few years later, Pollard's team showed that phosphorylation of MAPs inhibited the actin filament interaction (Selden and Pollard, 1983)... Recently, microtubule–actin interactions have made headlines again, with advances in light microscopy revealing that the filaments interact at the leading edge of migrating live cells (Rodriguez et al., 2003).

No MeSH data available.


Microtubules and actin filaments line up next to each other in vitro.POLLARD
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2254945&req=5

uro1: Microtubules and actin filaments line up next to each other in vitro.POLLARD


Actin and microtubules interact via MAPs
Microtubules and actin filaments line up next to each other in vitro.POLLARD
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2254945&req=5

uro1: Microtubules and actin filaments line up next to each other in vitro.POLLARD

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

There were “plenty of examples in electron micrographs where microtubule and actin filaments were in the same place in the cell,” says Thomas Pollard (Yale University, New Haven, CT)... But, he notes, no one had investigated whether the polymer filaments actually interacted with each other and, if so, by what molecular connections... The two used a rather low-tech viscometer that measured a ball bearing's rate of fall through a capillary tube filled with actin filaments and microtubules (Griffith and Pollard, 1978)... When they added purified tubulin and actin to the tube and allowed filaments to polymerize, the viscosity was similar to the sum of the filaments' individual viscosities... But when microtubules were purified with their microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), the viscosity of the mixture with actin jumped 120-fold... The experiments argued heavily for MAP-mediated cross-linking of microtubules and actin filaments... The paper was one of the first to assign a molecular role to the MAPs beyond promoting microtubule polymerization... A few years later, Pollard's team showed that phosphorylation of MAPs inhibited the actin filament interaction (Selden and Pollard, 1983)... Recently, microtubule–actin interactions have made headlines again, with advances in light microscopy revealing that the filaments interact at the leading edge of migrating live cells (Rodriguez et al., 2003).

No MeSH data available.