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What is new in iron overload?

Vermylen C - Eur. J. Pediatr. (2007)

Bottom Line: At the present time, new iron chelators that can be given orally are available.In conclusion, iron overload can be measured more accurately with noninvasive methods such as MRI.Deferasirox is a once-daily oral therapy for treating transfusional iron overload, which improves patient compliance and quality of life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Université Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Avenue Hippocrate 10, B 1200, Brussels, Belgium. vermylen@pedi.ucl.ac.be

ABSTRACT
Children with severe chronic hemolytic anemia or congenital erythroblastopenia are transfusion dependent. Long-term transfusion therapy prolongs life but results in a toxic accumulation of iron in the organs. The human body cannot actively eliminate excess iron. Therefore, the use of a chelating agent is required to promote excretion of iron. So far, iron chelation has been done by subcutaneous infusion of deferoxamine given over 10 h, 5-6 days per week. Compliance is poor and chelation often insufficient. Ferritin measurements and sometimes liver biopsies are used to evaluate the iron burden in the body. At the present time, new iron chelators that can be given orally are available. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of tissue iron is a noninvasive and highly reproducible method, which is able to quantitate organ iron burden. In conclusion, iron overload can be measured more accurately with noninvasive methods such as MRI. Deferasirox is a once-daily oral therapy for treating transfusional iron overload, which improves patient compliance and quality of life.

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Liver biopsy (Perls stain): iron deposits are in blue. Courtesy of B. Turlin, Pathology Department, University Hospital of Rennes
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Fig1: Liver biopsy (Perls stain): iron deposits are in blue. Courtesy of B. Turlin, Pathology Department, University Hospital of Rennes

Mentions: LIC measurement is the most accurate method for assessing body iron (Fig. 1). It also provides information about the severity of the liver disease [8]. Liver samples can be obtained by percutaneous or transjugular access. LIC measurement from a needle biopsy has been associated with a coefficient of variation of less than 10% in livers with no advanced disease. However, it has been shown that variability can be much higher in fibrotic and cirrhotic livers. Values of LIC are expressed as milligrams of iron per gram of dry liver weight.Fig. 1


What is new in iron overload?

Vermylen C - Eur. J. Pediatr. (2007)

Liver biopsy (Perls stain): iron deposits are in blue. Courtesy of B. Turlin, Pathology Department, University Hospital of Rennes
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2254659&req=5

Fig1: Liver biopsy (Perls stain): iron deposits are in blue. Courtesy of B. Turlin, Pathology Department, University Hospital of Rennes
Mentions: LIC measurement is the most accurate method for assessing body iron (Fig. 1). It also provides information about the severity of the liver disease [8]. Liver samples can be obtained by percutaneous or transjugular access. LIC measurement from a needle biopsy has been associated with a coefficient of variation of less than 10% in livers with no advanced disease. However, it has been shown that variability can be much higher in fibrotic and cirrhotic livers. Values of LIC are expressed as milligrams of iron per gram of dry liver weight.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: At the present time, new iron chelators that can be given orally are available.In conclusion, iron overload can be measured more accurately with noninvasive methods such as MRI.Deferasirox is a once-daily oral therapy for treating transfusional iron overload, which improves patient compliance and quality of life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Université Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Avenue Hippocrate 10, B 1200, Brussels, Belgium. vermylen@pedi.ucl.ac.be

ABSTRACT
Children with severe chronic hemolytic anemia or congenital erythroblastopenia are transfusion dependent. Long-term transfusion therapy prolongs life but results in a toxic accumulation of iron in the organs. The human body cannot actively eliminate excess iron. Therefore, the use of a chelating agent is required to promote excretion of iron. So far, iron chelation has been done by subcutaneous infusion of deferoxamine given over 10 h, 5-6 days per week. Compliance is poor and chelation often insufficient. Ferritin measurements and sometimes liver biopsies are used to evaluate the iron burden in the body. At the present time, new iron chelators that can be given orally are available. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of tissue iron is a noninvasive and highly reproducible method, which is able to quantitate organ iron burden. In conclusion, iron overload can be measured more accurately with noninvasive methods such as MRI. Deferasirox is a once-daily oral therapy for treating transfusional iron overload, which improves patient compliance and quality of life.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus