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Keep an eye on your hands: on the role of visual mechanisms in processing of haptic space.

Postma A, Zuidhoek S, Noordzij ML, Kappers AM - Cogn Process (2008)

Bottom Line: Moreover, offering visual background information also elevates performance.Interestingly, (congenitally) blind individuals do not or to a weaker extent show the improvement with time, while in parallel to this, they appear to benefit less from spatial imagery processing.Together this strongly points to an important role for visual processing mechanisms in the perception of haptic inputs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, Utrecht, The Netherlands. a.postma@uu.nl

ABSTRACT
The present paper reviews research on a haptic orientation processing. Central is a task in which a test bar has to be set parallel to a reference bar at another location. Introducing a delay between inspecting the reference bar and setting the test bar leads to a surprising improvement. Moreover, offering visual background information also elevates performance. Interestingly, (congenitally) blind individuals do not or to a weaker extent show the improvement with time, while in parallel to this, they appear to benefit less from spatial imagery processing. Together this strongly points to an important role for visual processing mechanisms in the perception of haptic inputs.

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Effects of non-informative vision and head orienting on haptic parallel setting. Neutral condition means straight-ahead head orientation. Adapted from Zuidhoek et al. (2004b)
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Fig4: Effects of non-informative vision and head orienting on haptic parallel setting. Neutral condition means straight-ahead head orientation. Adapted from Zuidhoek et al. (2004b)

Mentions: In line with this notion, Newport et al. (2002) showed that viewing the region of space directly above the haptic workspace (so-called non-informative vision) improves parallel-setting performance. Zuidhoek et al. (2004b) used a similar setup: the non-informative vision condition was created by an opaque cloth covering the workspace (i.e. the table and bars) as well as participants’ shoulders, arms and torso. They replicated the non-informative vision advantage and additionally demonstrated that the direction of head and eyes yields an independent impact on the parallel-setting performance, with head and eyes directed to the reference bar resulting in better parallel-setting performance than when orienting straight ahead or towards the test bar (see Fig. 4).Fig. 4


Keep an eye on your hands: on the role of visual mechanisms in processing of haptic space.

Postma A, Zuidhoek S, Noordzij ML, Kappers AM - Cogn Process (2008)

Effects of non-informative vision and head orienting on haptic parallel setting. Neutral condition means straight-ahead head orientation. Adapted from Zuidhoek et al. (2004b)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2254467&req=5

Fig4: Effects of non-informative vision and head orienting on haptic parallel setting. Neutral condition means straight-ahead head orientation. Adapted from Zuidhoek et al. (2004b)
Mentions: In line with this notion, Newport et al. (2002) showed that viewing the region of space directly above the haptic workspace (so-called non-informative vision) improves parallel-setting performance. Zuidhoek et al. (2004b) used a similar setup: the non-informative vision condition was created by an opaque cloth covering the workspace (i.e. the table and bars) as well as participants’ shoulders, arms and torso. They replicated the non-informative vision advantage and additionally demonstrated that the direction of head and eyes yields an independent impact on the parallel-setting performance, with head and eyes directed to the reference bar resulting in better parallel-setting performance than when orienting straight ahead or towards the test bar (see Fig. 4).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Moreover, offering visual background information also elevates performance.Interestingly, (congenitally) blind individuals do not or to a weaker extent show the improvement with time, while in parallel to this, they appear to benefit less from spatial imagery processing.Together this strongly points to an important role for visual processing mechanisms in the perception of haptic inputs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, Utrecht, The Netherlands. a.postma@uu.nl

ABSTRACT
The present paper reviews research on a haptic orientation processing. Central is a task in which a test bar has to be set parallel to a reference bar at another location. Introducing a delay between inspecting the reference bar and setting the test bar leads to a surprising improvement. Moreover, offering visual background information also elevates performance. Interestingly, (congenitally) blind individuals do not or to a weaker extent show the improvement with time, while in parallel to this, they appear to benefit less from spatial imagery processing. Together this strongly points to an important role for visual processing mechanisms in the perception of haptic inputs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus