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Humor and Laughter May Influence Health: III. Laughter and Health Outcomes.

Bennett MP, Lengacher C - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2008)

Bottom Line: The first article included basic background information, definitions and a review of the theoretical underpinnings for this area of research.The second article discussed use of humor as a complementary therapy within various clinical samples, as well as evidence concerning how a sense of humor influences physiological and psychological wellbeing.This third article examines how laughter influences health outcomes; including muscle tension, cardio-respiratory functioning and various stress physiology measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Indiana State University College of Nursing and University of South Florida.

ABSTRACT
This is part three of a four-part series reviewing the evidence on how humor influences physiological and psychological well-being. The first article included basic background information, definitions and a review of the theoretical underpinnings for this area of research. The second article discussed use of humor as a complementary therapy within various clinical samples, as well as evidence concerning how a sense of humor influences physiological and psychological wellbeing. This third article examines how laughter influences health outcomes; including muscle tension, cardio-respiratory functioning and various stress physiology measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histogram represents hormonal response to viewing four different film types by healthy women. Bars indicate mean urinary output of epinephrine and norepinephrine pre- and post-stimulus (11).
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Figure 1: Histogram represents hormonal response to viewing four different film types by healthy women. Bars indicate mean urinary output of epinephrine and norepinephrine pre- and post-stimulus (11).

Mentions: Research examining how laughter influences stress hormones is somewhat conflicting. One early study looked at the results of viewing four different films on urinary excretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine in 20 female subjects (11). The four films were chosen to elicit different emotions. The first was a natural-scenery film, which was expected to be very bland and not to elicit any strong emotions. A second film was funny, and elicited mirth and laughter. A third film was a war movie and was used to elicit feelings of tragedy and sadness. The fourth film was a horror story chosen to elicit anxiety. All of the subjects viewed each film and served as their own control mechanism in a pre–post-test design. Urinary hormone levels were measured during a 90 min control period before each film, during each film, and finally during a 90 min post-film session. Urinary epinephrine levels decreased significantly during the natural-scenery film (P < 0.01). Urinary epinephrine levels increased significantly during the war film (P < 0.05). Urinary epinephrine and norepinephrine both increased significantly during the humorous film (P < 0.05). Urinary epinephrine increased the most dramatically during the anxiety provoking film (P < 0.05), and norepinephrine levels also increased significantly during this film (P<0.001) see Fig. 1 (11).Figure 1.


Humor and Laughter May Influence Health: III. Laughter and Health Outcomes.

Bennett MP, Lengacher C - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2008)

Histogram represents hormonal response to viewing four different film types by healthy women. Bars indicate mean urinary output of epinephrine and norepinephrine pre- and post-stimulus (11).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2249748&req=5

Figure 1: Histogram represents hormonal response to viewing four different film types by healthy women. Bars indicate mean urinary output of epinephrine and norepinephrine pre- and post-stimulus (11).
Mentions: Research examining how laughter influences stress hormones is somewhat conflicting. One early study looked at the results of viewing four different films on urinary excretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine in 20 female subjects (11). The four films were chosen to elicit different emotions. The first was a natural-scenery film, which was expected to be very bland and not to elicit any strong emotions. A second film was funny, and elicited mirth and laughter. A third film was a war movie and was used to elicit feelings of tragedy and sadness. The fourth film was a horror story chosen to elicit anxiety. All of the subjects viewed each film and served as their own control mechanism in a pre–post-test design. Urinary hormone levels were measured during a 90 min control period before each film, during each film, and finally during a 90 min post-film session. Urinary epinephrine levels decreased significantly during the natural-scenery film (P < 0.01). Urinary epinephrine levels increased significantly during the war film (P < 0.05). Urinary epinephrine and norepinephrine both increased significantly during the humorous film (P < 0.05). Urinary epinephrine increased the most dramatically during the anxiety provoking film (P < 0.05), and norepinephrine levels also increased significantly during this film (P<0.001) see Fig. 1 (11).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The first article included basic background information, definitions and a review of the theoretical underpinnings for this area of research.The second article discussed use of humor as a complementary therapy within various clinical samples, as well as evidence concerning how a sense of humor influences physiological and psychological wellbeing.This third article examines how laughter influences health outcomes; including muscle tension, cardio-respiratory functioning and various stress physiology measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Indiana State University College of Nursing and University of South Florida.

ABSTRACT
This is part three of a four-part series reviewing the evidence on how humor influences physiological and psychological well-being. The first article included basic background information, definitions and a review of the theoretical underpinnings for this area of research. The second article discussed use of humor as a complementary therapy within various clinical samples, as well as evidence concerning how a sense of humor influences physiological and psychological wellbeing. This third article examines how laughter influences health outcomes; including muscle tension, cardio-respiratory functioning and various stress physiology measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus