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The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata.

Liolios K, Mavromatis K, Tavernarakis N, Kyrpides NC - Nucleic Acids Res. (2007)

Bottom Line: The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource that provides information on genome and metagenome projects worldwide.As of September 2007, GOLD contains information on more than 2900 sequencing projects, out of which 639 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in the public databases.GOLD continues to expand with the goal of providing metadata information related to the projects and the organisms/environments towards the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) guideline.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Chicago, Department of Medicine, Chicago, Genome Biology Program, Joint Genome Institute, 2800 Mitchell Drive, Walnut Creek, USA.

ABSTRACT
The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource that provides information on genome and metagenome projects worldwide. Complete and ongoing projects and their associated metadata can be accessed in GOLD through pre-computed lists and a search page. As of September 2007, GOLD contains information on more than 2900 sequencing projects, out of which 639 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in the public databases. GOLD continues to expand with the goal of providing metadata information related to the projects and the organisms/environments towards the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) guideline. GOLD is available at http://www.genomesonline.org and has a mirror site at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Crete, Greece at http://gold.imbb.forth.gr/

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Statistical information available in GOLD. (A) Distribution of the 2995 genome projects across the major sequencing centers. Abbreviations are for, JGI: Joint Genome Institute, TIGR: The Institute for Genome Research, JCVI: J. Craig Venter Institute, WashU: Washington University and WORLD: all other sequencing centers. (B) Distribution of the 1949 bacterial and archaeal genome projects across the major sequencing centers. (C) Phylogenetic distribution of the 790 bacterial genome projects in January 2005. (D) Phylogenetic distribution of the 1832 bacterial genome projects in September 2007.
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Figure 1: Statistical information available in GOLD. (A) Distribution of the 2995 genome projects across the major sequencing centers. Abbreviations are for, JGI: Joint Genome Institute, TIGR: The Institute for Genome Research, JCVI: J. Craig Venter Institute, WashU: Washington University and WORLD: all other sequencing centers. (B) Distribution of the 1949 bacterial and archaeal genome projects across the major sequencing centers. (C) Phylogenetic distribution of the 790 bacterial genome projects in January 2005. (D) Phylogenetic distribution of the 1832 bacterial genome projects in September 2007.

Mentions: More than half of the 2900 currently available sequencing projects on GOLD are distributed among only four major sequencing centers (since TIGR and the Venter Institute have recently merged). When only the archaeal and bacterial projects are taken into account, two sequencing centers seem to carry more than half of the world's production. These are the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and the Venter Institute (JCVI) with TIGR. On top of the list in both cases is the JGI, which is the Department of Energy (DOE) sequencing facility with 23% and 27% of world's production respectively (Figure 1). This is based on the number of unique individual projects, and do not correspond directly to the actual size of the project or the number of sequenced bases that is harder to monitor.Figure 1.


The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata.

Liolios K, Mavromatis K, Tavernarakis N, Kyrpides NC - Nucleic Acids Res. (2007)

Statistical information available in GOLD. (A) Distribution of the 2995 genome projects across the major sequencing centers. Abbreviations are for, JGI: Joint Genome Institute, TIGR: The Institute for Genome Research, JCVI: J. Craig Venter Institute, WashU: Washington University and WORLD: all other sequencing centers. (B) Distribution of the 1949 bacterial and archaeal genome projects across the major sequencing centers. (C) Phylogenetic distribution of the 790 bacterial genome projects in January 2005. (D) Phylogenetic distribution of the 1832 bacterial genome projects in September 2007.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238992&req=5

Figure 1: Statistical information available in GOLD. (A) Distribution of the 2995 genome projects across the major sequencing centers. Abbreviations are for, JGI: Joint Genome Institute, TIGR: The Institute for Genome Research, JCVI: J. Craig Venter Institute, WashU: Washington University and WORLD: all other sequencing centers. (B) Distribution of the 1949 bacterial and archaeal genome projects across the major sequencing centers. (C) Phylogenetic distribution of the 790 bacterial genome projects in January 2005. (D) Phylogenetic distribution of the 1832 bacterial genome projects in September 2007.
Mentions: More than half of the 2900 currently available sequencing projects on GOLD are distributed among only four major sequencing centers (since TIGR and the Venter Institute have recently merged). When only the archaeal and bacterial projects are taken into account, two sequencing centers seem to carry more than half of the world's production. These are the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and the Venter Institute (JCVI) with TIGR. On top of the list in both cases is the JGI, which is the Department of Energy (DOE) sequencing facility with 23% and 27% of world's production respectively (Figure 1). This is based on the number of unique individual projects, and do not correspond directly to the actual size of the project or the number of sequenced bases that is harder to monitor.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource that provides information on genome and metagenome projects worldwide.As of September 2007, GOLD contains information on more than 2900 sequencing projects, out of which 639 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in the public databases.GOLD continues to expand with the goal of providing metadata information related to the projects and the organisms/environments towards the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) guideline.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Chicago, Department of Medicine, Chicago, Genome Biology Program, Joint Genome Institute, 2800 Mitchell Drive, Walnut Creek, USA.

ABSTRACT
The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource that provides information on genome and metagenome projects worldwide. Complete and ongoing projects and their associated metadata can be accessed in GOLD through pre-computed lists and a search page. As of September 2007, GOLD contains information on more than 2900 sequencing projects, out of which 639 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in the public databases. GOLD continues to expand with the goal of providing metadata information related to the projects and the organisms/environments towards the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) guideline. GOLD is available at http://www.genomesonline.org and has a mirror site at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Crete, Greece at http://gold.imbb.forth.gr/

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