Limits...
GLIDA: GPCR--ligand database for chemical genomics drug discovery--database and tools update.

Okuno Y, Tamon A, Yabuuchi H, Niijima S, Minowa Y, Tonomura K, Kunimoto R, Feng C - Nucleic Acids Res. (2007)

Bottom Line: It provides interaction data between GPCRs and their ligands, along with chemical information on the ligands, as well as biological information regarding GPCRs.By analyzing the correlation patterns between GPCRs and ligands, we can gain more detailed knowledge about their conserved molecular recognition patterns and improve drug design efforts by focusing on inferred candidates for GPCR-specific drugs.This article provides a summary of the GLIDA database and user facilities, and describes recent improvements to database design, data contents, ligand classification programs, similarity search options and graphical interfaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of PharmacoInformatics, Center for Integrative Education of Pharmacy Frontier, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Japan. okuno@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the most important families of drug targets in pharmaceutical development. GLIDA is a public GPCR-related Chemical Genomics database that is primarily focused on the integration of information between GPCRs and their ligands. It provides interaction data between GPCRs and their ligands, along with chemical information on the ligands, as well as biological information regarding GPCRs. These data are connected with each other in a relational database, allowing users in the field of Chemical Genomics research to easily retrieve such information from either biological or chemical starting points. GLIDA includes a variety of similarity search functions for the GPCRs and for their ligands. Thus, GLIDA can provide correlation maps linking the searched homologous GPCRs (or ligands) with their ligands (or GPCRs). By analyzing the correlation patterns between GPCRs and ligands, we can gain more detailed knowledge about their conserved molecular recognition patterns and improve drug design efforts by focusing on inferred candidates for GPCR-specific drugs. This article provides a summary of the GLIDA database and user facilities, and describes recent improvements to database design, data contents, ligand classification programs, similarity search options and graphical interfaces. GLIDA is publicly available at http://pharminfo.pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp/services/glida/. We hope that it will prove very useful for Chemical Genomics research and GPCR-related drug discovery.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

A screenshot of GLIDA showing linked relations among search pages (a and b), result pages (c and d), an analytical report page (e), and a binding information page (f). The analytical report page consists of a correlation map and a list resulting from a similarity search. Red and blue colors of the spots on the correlation map indicate the ligand activities of antagonists including inverse agonist and agonists including full/partial agonist, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238933&req=5

Figure 1: A screenshot of GLIDA showing linked relations among search pages (a and b), result pages (c and d), an analytical report page (e), and a binding information page (f). The analytical report page consists of a correlation map and a list resulting from a similarity search. Red and blue colors of the spots on the correlation map indicate the ligand activities of antagonists including inverse agonist and agonists including full/partial agonist, respectively.

Mentions: GLIDA is available at http://pharminfo.pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp/services/glida/. The web interface of GLIDA includes a GPCR search page (Figure 1a) and a ligand search page (Figure 1b). Each page consists of a classification menu and a keyword search box. The users can search a GPCR (or ligand) manually using the classification tool, or automatically by using the keyword search function. Every GPCR (or ligand) has its own results page (Figure 1c or d) containing a general information table regarding a GPCR (or ligand), a table of its correlated ligands (or GPCRs) and a menu button to carry out a similarity search and correlation analysis.Figure 1.


GLIDA: GPCR--ligand database for chemical genomics drug discovery--database and tools update.

Okuno Y, Tamon A, Yabuuchi H, Niijima S, Minowa Y, Tonomura K, Kunimoto R, Feng C - Nucleic Acids Res. (2007)

A screenshot of GLIDA showing linked relations among search pages (a and b), result pages (c and d), an analytical report page (e), and a binding information page (f). The analytical report page consists of a correlation map and a list resulting from a similarity search. Red and blue colors of the spots on the correlation map indicate the ligand activities of antagonists including inverse agonist and agonists including full/partial agonist, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238933&req=5

Figure 1: A screenshot of GLIDA showing linked relations among search pages (a and b), result pages (c and d), an analytical report page (e), and a binding information page (f). The analytical report page consists of a correlation map and a list resulting from a similarity search. Red and blue colors of the spots on the correlation map indicate the ligand activities of antagonists including inverse agonist and agonists including full/partial agonist, respectively.
Mentions: GLIDA is available at http://pharminfo.pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp/services/glida/. The web interface of GLIDA includes a GPCR search page (Figure 1a) and a ligand search page (Figure 1b). Each page consists of a classification menu and a keyword search box. The users can search a GPCR (or ligand) manually using the classification tool, or automatically by using the keyword search function. Every GPCR (or ligand) has its own results page (Figure 1c or d) containing a general information table regarding a GPCR (or ligand), a table of its correlated ligands (or GPCRs) and a menu button to carry out a similarity search and correlation analysis.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: It provides interaction data between GPCRs and their ligands, along with chemical information on the ligands, as well as biological information regarding GPCRs.By analyzing the correlation patterns between GPCRs and ligands, we can gain more detailed knowledge about their conserved molecular recognition patterns and improve drug design efforts by focusing on inferred candidates for GPCR-specific drugs.This article provides a summary of the GLIDA database and user facilities, and describes recent improvements to database design, data contents, ligand classification programs, similarity search options and graphical interfaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of PharmacoInformatics, Center for Integrative Education of Pharmacy Frontier, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Japan. okuno@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the most important families of drug targets in pharmaceutical development. GLIDA is a public GPCR-related Chemical Genomics database that is primarily focused on the integration of information between GPCRs and their ligands. It provides interaction data between GPCRs and their ligands, along with chemical information on the ligands, as well as biological information regarding GPCRs. These data are connected with each other in a relational database, allowing users in the field of Chemical Genomics research to easily retrieve such information from either biological or chemical starting points. GLIDA includes a variety of similarity search functions for the GPCRs and for their ligands. Thus, GLIDA can provide correlation maps linking the searched homologous GPCRs (or ligands) with their ligands (or GPCRs). By analyzing the correlation patterns between GPCRs and ligands, we can gain more detailed knowledge about their conserved molecular recognition patterns and improve drug design efforts by focusing on inferred candidates for GPCR-specific drugs. This article provides a summary of the GLIDA database and user facilities, and describes recent improvements to database design, data contents, ligand classification programs, similarity search options and graphical interfaces. GLIDA is publicly available at http://pharminfo.pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp/services/glida/. We hope that it will prove very useful for Chemical Genomics research and GPCR-related drug discovery.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus