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The hepatitis C sequence database in Los Alamos.

Kuiken C, Hraber P, Thurmond J, Yusim K - Nucleic Acids Res. (2007)

Bottom Line: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant public health threat worldwide.Presently, approximately 50 000 HCV sequences have been published.A central website that provides annotated sequences and analysis tools will be helpful to HCV scientists worldwide.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HCV database, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA. kuiken@lanl.gov

ABSTRACT
The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant public health threat worldwide. The virus is highly variable and evolves rapidly, making it an elusive target for the immune system and for vaccine and drug design. Presently, approximately 50 000 HCV sequences have been published. A central website that provides annotated sequences and analysis tools will be helpful to HCV scientists worldwide. The HCV sequence database collects and annotates sequence data, and provides them to the public via a website that contains a user-friendly search interface and a large number of sequence analysis tools, following the model of the highly regarded and widely used Los Alamos HIV database. The HCV website can be accessed via http://hcv.lanl.gov and http://hcv-db.org.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

World map showing the geographical distribution of sequences with different genotypes in the HCV database. The map was generated using the geography tool, available on the HCV website.
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Figure 2: World map showing the geographical distribution of sequences with different genotypes in the HCV database. The map was generated using the geography tool, available on the HCV website.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows output from the ‘Geography tool’, which can be used to plot frequencies of the different genotypes stored in the database as a function of their geographical origin. This tool can be very useful to get a general idea of which genotypes have been found in which countries, as well as the density of sampling in different regions of the world.Figure 2.


The hepatitis C sequence database in Los Alamos.

Kuiken C, Hraber P, Thurmond J, Yusim K - Nucleic Acids Res. (2007)

World map showing the geographical distribution of sequences with different genotypes in the HCV database. The map was generated using the geography tool, available on the HCV website.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238885&req=5

Figure 2: World map showing the geographical distribution of sequences with different genotypes in the HCV database. The map was generated using the geography tool, available on the HCV website.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows output from the ‘Geography tool’, which can be used to plot frequencies of the different genotypes stored in the database as a function of their geographical origin. This tool can be very useful to get a general idea of which genotypes have been found in which countries, as well as the density of sampling in different regions of the world.Figure 2.

Bottom Line: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant public health threat worldwide.Presently, approximately 50 000 HCV sequences have been published.A central website that provides annotated sequences and analysis tools will be helpful to HCV scientists worldwide.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HCV database, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA. kuiken@lanl.gov

ABSTRACT
The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant public health threat worldwide. The virus is highly variable and evolves rapidly, making it an elusive target for the immune system and for vaccine and drug design. Presently, approximately 50 000 HCV sequences have been published. A central website that provides annotated sequences and analysis tools will be helpful to HCV scientists worldwide. The HCV sequence database collects and annotates sequence data, and provides them to the public via a website that contains a user-friendly search interface and a large number of sequence analysis tools, following the model of the highly regarded and widely used Los Alamos HIV database. The HCV website can be accessed via http://hcv.lanl.gov and http://hcv-db.org.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus