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How valid are current diagnostic criteria for dental erosion?

Ganss C - Clin Oral Investig (2008)

Bottom Line: Besides other aspects, this finding might be due to lack of validity with respect to diagnostic criteria.In particular, cupping and grooving might be an effect of abrasion as well as of erosion and their value for the specific diagnosis of erosion must be doubted.Knowledge about the validity of current diagnostic criteria of different forms of tooth wear is incomplete, therefore further research is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry, Dental Clinic of the Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Giessen, Germany. carolina.ganss@dentist.med.uni-giessen.de

ABSTRACT
In principle, there is agreement about the clinical diagnostic criteria for dental erosion, basically defined as cupping and grooving of the occlusal/incisal surfaces, shallow defects on smooth surfaces located coronal from the enamel-cementum junction with an intact cervical enamel rim and restorations rising above the adjacent tooth surface. This lesion characteristic was established from clinical experience and from observations in a small group of subjects with known exposure to acids rather than from systematic research. Their prevalence is higher in risk groups for dental erosion compared to subjects not particularly exposed to acids, but analytical epidemiological studies on random or cluster samples often fail to find a relation between occurrence or severity of lesions and any aetiological factor. Besides other aspects, this finding might be due to lack of validity with respect to diagnostic criteria. In particular, cupping and grooving might be an effect of abrasion as well as of erosion and their value for the specific diagnosis of erosion must be doubted. Knowledge about the validity of current diagnostic criteria of different forms of tooth wear is incomplete, therefore further research is needed.

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Occlusal tissue loss from erosive aetiology can also be of strikingly different shape either presenting as deeply hollowed out lesions (a subject with raw food diet [15], b subject with excessive consumption of orange juice) or as amorphous generalised tissue loss affecting the entire surface (c, d subjects with excessive consumption of erosive drinks). An interesting feature is seen in an adolescent with a history of severe anterior open bite with only the molars being in function e Substance loss occurred from excessive consumption of a cola type drink. In the premolars, dentine is proud of the surface. f Hollowing out the entire occlusal surface with enamel remnants in the centre, aetiology is the excessive consumption of sport drinks
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Fig4: Occlusal tissue loss from erosive aetiology can also be of strikingly different shape either presenting as deeply hollowed out lesions (a subject with raw food diet [15], b subject with excessive consumption of orange juice) or as amorphous generalised tissue loss affecting the entire surface (c, d subjects with excessive consumption of erosive drinks). An interesting feature is seen in an adolescent with a history of severe anterior open bite with only the molars being in function e Substance loss occurred from excessive consumption of a cola type drink. In the premolars, dentine is proud of the surface. f Hollowing out the entire occlusal surface with enamel remnants in the centre, aetiology is the excessive consumption of sport drinks

Mentions: a Buccal aspect of teeth 44–47 with significant loss of crown height, but without any lesion in a medieval remain [13] with severe generalised occlusal wear c. b Occlusal defects in a subject living on a raw food diet with a high intake of acidic food [15]. The shape of the occlusal lesions is similar to c, but combined with shallow lesions with intact cervical rim lesions. d Same subject with Fig. 4b with an initial buccal lesion


How valid are current diagnostic criteria for dental erosion?

Ganss C - Clin Oral Investig (2008)

Occlusal tissue loss from erosive aetiology can also be of strikingly different shape either presenting as deeply hollowed out lesions (a subject with raw food diet [15], b subject with excessive consumption of orange juice) or as amorphous generalised tissue loss affecting the entire surface (c, d subjects with excessive consumption of erosive drinks). An interesting feature is seen in an adolescent with a history of severe anterior open bite with only the molars being in function e Substance loss occurred from excessive consumption of a cola type drink. In the premolars, dentine is proud of the surface. f Hollowing out the entire occlusal surface with enamel remnants in the centre, aetiology is the excessive consumption of sport drinks
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238791&req=5

Fig4: Occlusal tissue loss from erosive aetiology can also be of strikingly different shape either presenting as deeply hollowed out lesions (a subject with raw food diet [15], b subject with excessive consumption of orange juice) or as amorphous generalised tissue loss affecting the entire surface (c, d subjects with excessive consumption of erosive drinks). An interesting feature is seen in an adolescent with a history of severe anterior open bite with only the molars being in function e Substance loss occurred from excessive consumption of a cola type drink. In the premolars, dentine is proud of the surface. f Hollowing out the entire occlusal surface with enamel remnants in the centre, aetiology is the excessive consumption of sport drinks
Mentions: a Buccal aspect of teeth 44–47 with significant loss of crown height, but without any lesion in a medieval remain [13] with severe generalised occlusal wear c. b Occlusal defects in a subject living on a raw food diet with a high intake of acidic food [15]. The shape of the occlusal lesions is similar to c, but combined with shallow lesions with intact cervical rim lesions. d Same subject with Fig. 4b with an initial buccal lesion

Bottom Line: Besides other aspects, this finding might be due to lack of validity with respect to diagnostic criteria.In particular, cupping and grooving might be an effect of abrasion as well as of erosion and their value for the specific diagnosis of erosion must be doubted.Knowledge about the validity of current diagnostic criteria of different forms of tooth wear is incomplete, therefore further research is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry, Dental Clinic of the Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Giessen, Germany. carolina.ganss@dentist.med.uni-giessen.de

ABSTRACT
In principle, there is agreement about the clinical diagnostic criteria for dental erosion, basically defined as cupping and grooving of the occlusal/incisal surfaces, shallow defects on smooth surfaces located coronal from the enamel-cementum junction with an intact cervical enamel rim and restorations rising above the adjacent tooth surface. This lesion characteristic was established from clinical experience and from observations in a small group of subjects with known exposure to acids rather than from systematic research. Their prevalence is higher in risk groups for dental erosion compared to subjects not particularly exposed to acids, but analytical epidemiological studies on random or cluster samples often fail to find a relation between occurrence or severity of lesions and any aetiological factor. Besides other aspects, this finding might be due to lack of validity with respect to diagnostic criteria. In particular, cupping and grooving might be an effect of abrasion as well as of erosion and their value for the specific diagnosis of erosion must be doubted. Knowledge about the validity of current diagnostic criteria of different forms of tooth wear is incomplete, therefore further research is needed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus