Limits...
Pathological or physiological erosion--is there a relationship to age?

Bartlett D, Dugmore C - Clin Oral Investig (2008)

Bottom Line: The data from the few studies reporting pathological levels of wear reported in children and adults are discussed, in particular its relationship with age.There is little evidence to support the concept that pathological levels of erosion or wear are age dependant.There is, however, some evidence to suggest that normal levels of erosion or wear are age dependant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics, King's College London Dental Institute, Floor 25, Guy's Tower, London Bridge, SE19RT, London, UK. david.bartlett@kcl.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
This conventional literature review discusses whether pathological tooth wear is age dependant. It briefly reviews the components of tooth wear and the prevalence of tooth wear in children, adolescents and adults. The emphasis on terminology relating to tooth wear varies. In some countries, the role of erosion is considered the most important, whereas others consider the process to be a combination of erosion, attrition and abrasion often with one being more dominant. The importance of tooth wear or erosion indices in the assessment and the evidence for progression within subject and within lesions is described. The data from the few studies reporting pathological levels of wear reported in children and adults are discussed, in particular its relationship with age. There is little evidence to support the concept that pathological levels of erosion or wear are age dependant. There is, however, some evidence to suggest that normal levels of erosion or wear are age dependant.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The wear on the palatal/lingual surfaces of the teeth has been caused by regurgitation erosion. It is unlikely that abrasion or attrition has contributed to the process
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238780&req=5

Fig2: The wear on the palatal/lingual surfaces of the teeth has been caused by regurgitation erosion. It is unlikely that abrasion or attrition has contributed to the process

Mentions: However, different countries interpret the aetiologies in different ways [8]. Many European countries focus attention upon erosive tooth wear, whereas in North American countries, abrasion or attrition is more commonly recognised whilst the role of erosion is less understood. In the United Kingdom, although the importance of erosion is acknowledged, the impact of abrasion and attrition is also recognised, and the term tooth wear is more commonly used. When interpreting studies from different parts of the world, some consideration of these subtle differences should be understood. The major difference seems to be the impact of attrition. For many clinical situations, the impact of wear on the teeth is a combination of attrition and erosion particularly on the incisal or occlusal surfaces of teeth (Figs. 1 and 2) [10]. On the buccal or lingual surfaces, erosion is usually more dominant, but the impact of abrasion should not be forgotten. Since it is almost impossible to tell from the appearance of a lesion what is the underlying cause, it maybe more correct to use the term tooth wear. But there are circumstances in which one cause, more commonly erosion, is the dominant feature. Although the definitions of tooth wear and erosion are quite different, they can often be used to describe the same process.Fig. 1


Pathological or physiological erosion--is there a relationship to age?

Bartlett D, Dugmore C - Clin Oral Investig (2008)

The wear on the palatal/lingual surfaces of the teeth has been caused by regurgitation erosion. It is unlikely that abrasion or attrition has contributed to the process
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238780&req=5

Fig2: The wear on the palatal/lingual surfaces of the teeth has been caused by regurgitation erosion. It is unlikely that abrasion or attrition has contributed to the process
Mentions: However, different countries interpret the aetiologies in different ways [8]. Many European countries focus attention upon erosive tooth wear, whereas in North American countries, abrasion or attrition is more commonly recognised whilst the role of erosion is less understood. In the United Kingdom, although the importance of erosion is acknowledged, the impact of abrasion and attrition is also recognised, and the term tooth wear is more commonly used. When interpreting studies from different parts of the world, some consideration of these subtle differences should be understood. The major difference seems to be the impact of attrition. For many clinical situations, the impact of wear on the teeth is a combination of attrition and erosion particularly on the incisal or occlusal surfaces of teeth (Figs. 1 and 2) [10]. On the buccal or lingual surfaces, erosion is usually more dominant, but the impact of abrasion should not be forgotten. Since it is almost impossible to tell from the appearance of a lesion what is the underlying cause, it maybe more correct to use the term tooth wear. But there are circumstances in which one cause, more commonly erosion, is the dominant feature. Although the definitions of tooth wear and erosion are quite different, they can often be used to describe the same process.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The data from the few studies reporting pathological levels of wear reported in children and adults are discussed, in particular its relationship with age.There is little evidence to support the concept that pathological levels of erosion or wear are age dependant.There is, however, some evidence to suggest that normal levels of erosion or wear are age dependant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics, King's College London Dental Institute, Floor 25, Guy's Tower, London Bridge, SE19RT, London, UK. david.bartlett@kcl.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
This conventional literature review discusses whether pathological tooth wear is age dependant. It briefly reviews the components of tooth wear and the prevalence of tooth wear in children, adolescents and adults. The emphasis on terminology relating to tooth wear varies. In some countries, the role of erosion is considered the most important, whereas others consider the process to be a combination of erosion, attrition and abrasion often with one being more dominant. The importance of tooth wear or erosion indices in the assessment and the evidence for progression within subject and within lesions is described. The data from the few studies reporting pathological levels of wear reported in children and adults are discussed, in particular its relationship with age. There is little evidence to support the concept that pathological levels of erosion or wear are age dependant. There is, however, some evidence to suggest that normal levels of erosion or wear are age dependant.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus