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A phase III trial comparing an anionic phospholipid-based cream and aloe vera-based gel in the prevention of radiation dermatitis in pediatric patients.

Merchant TE, Bosley C, Smith J, Baratti P, Pritchard D, Davis T, Li C, Xiong X - Radiat Oncol (2007)

Bottom Line: Significant differences in specific variables favoring APP cream use were noted in some patients including skin comfort variables, dry (p = 0.002), soft (p = 0.057), feels good (p = 0.002), rough (p = 0.065), smooth (p = 0.012) and dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.013), erythema (p = 0.002) and peely (p = 0.008).Grouped CTC scores were supportive of APP cream (p = 0.004).In comparing the first and last assessments, two dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.035) and peely (p = 0.016), favored APP cream.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA. thomas.merchant@stjude.org

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Radiation dermatitis is a common side effect of radiation therapy (RT). In severe cases, RT must be interrupted until the skin heals, which can compromise treatment. The purpose of the study was to compare an anionic polar phospholipid (APP)-based cream and an aloe vera-based gel to determine their effectiveness in preventing and treating radiation dermatitis.

Patients and methods: Forty-five pediatric patients (median age, 11 years) with various diagnoses who received at least 23.4 Gy participated. APP cream and aloe vera gel were symmetrically applied within the irradiated field after each treatment. Three measures were collected before, during and after completion of treatment: subject's skin comfort, dermatologic assessment, and common toxicity criteria (CTC).

Results: Significant differences in specific variables favoring APP cream use were noted in some patients including skin comfort variables, dry (p = 0.002), soft (p = 0.057), feels good (p = 0.002), rough (p = 0.065), smooth (p = 0.012) and dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.013), erythema (p = 0.002) and peely (p = 0.008). Grouped CTC scores were supportive of APP cream (p = 0.004). In comparing the first and last assessments, two dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.035) and peely (p = 0.016), favored APP cream.

Conclusion: APP cream is more effective than aloe vera-based gel for prevention and treatment of radiation dermatitis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photograph of patient who received mantle irradiation and outline of symmetric areas for study.
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Figure 2: Photograph of patient who received mantle irradiation and outline of symmetric areas for study.

Mentions: Patients underwent fluoroscopic simulation before actual therapy was initiated. After the simulation, the patient was evaluated in the radiation oncology clinic by the attending physician and nursing staff. Study questionnaires were completed once the anatomic study region (region, site, and area are used interchangeably) was defined, divided into two parts, and photographed (Figure 2). The study focused on patients whose radiation treatment fields allowed for easy access and examination. Patients who received craniospinal irradiation or mantle irradiation had symmetrical irradiation of the region between the mastoids and the clavicles; these regions were often chosen for ease of study. Patients who received RT to an extremity, the trunk, or abdomen were included if the homogeneity of radiation dose permitted a well-defined anatomic region to be evaluated.


A phase III trial comparing an anionic phospholipid-based cream and aloe vera-based gel in the prevention of radiation dermatitis in pediatric patients.

Merchant TE, Bosley C, Smith J, Baratti P, Pritchard D, Davis T, Li C, Xiong X - Radiat Oncol (2007)

Photograph of patient who received mantle irradiation and outline of symmetric areas for study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238757&req=5

Figure 2: Photograph of patient who received mantle irradiation and outline of symmetric areas for study.
Mentions: Patients underwent fluoroscopic simulation before actual therapy was initiated. After the simulation, the patient was evaluated in the radiation oncology clinic by the attending physician and nursing staff. Study questionnaires were completed once the anatomic study region (region, site, and area are used interchangeably) was defined, divided into two parts, and photographed (Figure 2). The study focused on patients whose radiation treatment fields allowed for easy access and examination. Patients who received craniospinal irradiation or mantle irradiation had symmetrical irradiation of the region between the mastoids and the clavicles; these regions were often chosen for ease of study. Patients who received RT to an extremity, the trunk, or abdomen were included if the homogeneity of radiation dose permitted a well-defined anatomic region to be evaluated.

Bottom Line: Significant differences in specific variables favoring APP cream use were noted in some patients including skin comfort variables, dry (p = 0.002), soft (p = 0.057), feels good (p = 0.002), rough (p = 0.065), smooth (p = 0.012) and dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.013), erythema (p = 0.002) and peely (p = 0.008).Grouped CTC scores were supportive of APP cream (p = 0.004).In comparing the first and last assessments, two dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.035) and peely (p = 0.016), favored APP cream.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA. thomas.merchant@stjude.org

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Radiation dermatitis is a common side effect of radiation therapy (RT). In severe cases, RT must be interrupted until the skin heals, which can compromise treatment. The purpose of the study was to compare an anionic polar phospholipid (APP)-based cream and an aloe vera-based gel to determine their effectiveness in preventing and treating radiation dermatitis.

Patients and methods: Forty-five pediatric patients (median age, 11 years) with various diagnoses who received at least 23.4 Gy participated. APP cream and aloe vera gel were symmetrically applied within the irradiated field after each treatment. Three measures were collected before, during and after completion of treatment: subject's skin comfort, dermatologic assessment, and common toxicity criteria (CTC).

Results: Significant differences in specific variables favoring APP cream use were noted in some patients including skin comfort variables, dry (p = 0.002), soft (p = 0.057), feels good (p = 0.002), rough (p = 0.065), smooth (p = 0.012) and dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.013), erythema (p = 0.002) and peely (p = 0.008). Grouped CTC scores were supportive of APP cream (p = 0.004). In comparing the first and last assessments, two dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.035) and peely (p = 0.016), favored APP cream.

Conclusion: APP cream is more effective than aloe vera-based gel for prevention and treatment of radiation dermatitis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus