Limits...
Public involvement in the priority setting activities of a wait time management initiative: a qualitative case study.

Bruni RA, Laupacis A, Levinson W, Martin DK - BMC Health Serv Res (2007)

Bottom Line: Study participants identified both benefits (supporting the initiative, experts of the lived experience, a publicly funded system and sustainability of the healthcare system) and concerns (personal biases, lack of interest to be involved, time constraints, and level of technicality) for public involvement in the Ontario Wait Time Strategy.Additionally, the participants identified concern for the consequences (sustainability, cannibalism, and a class system) resulting from the Ontario Wait Times Strategy.We described and evaluated a wait time management initiative (the Ontario Wait Time Strategy) with special attention to public engagement, and provided a concrete plan to operationalize a strategy for improving public involvement in this, and other, wait time initiatives.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Joint Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. rebecca.bruni@utoronto.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: As no health system can afford to provide all possible services and treatments for the people it serves, each system must set priorities. Priority setting decision makers are increasingly involving the public in policy making. This study focuses on public engagement in a key priority setting context that plagues every health system around the world: wait list management. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate priority setting for the Ontario Wait Time Strategy, with special attention to public engagement.

Methods: This study was conducted at the Ontario Wait Time Strategy in Ontario, Canada which is part of a Federal-Territorial-Provincial initiative to improve access and reduce wait times in five areas: cancer, cardiac, sight restoration, joint replacements, and diagnostic imaging. There were two sources of data: (1) over 25 documents (e.g. strategic planning reports, public updates), and (2) 28 one-on-one interviews with informants (e.g. OWTS participants, MOHLTC representatives, clinicians, patient advocates). Analysis used a modified thematic technique in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and evaluation.

Results: The Ontario Wait Time Strategy partially meets the four conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness'. The public was not directly involved in the priority setting activities of the Ontario Wait Time Strategy. Study participants identified both benefits (supporting the initiative, experts of the lived experience, a publicly funded system and sustainability of the healthcare system) and concerns (personal biases, lack of interest to be involved, time constraints, and level of technicality) for public involvement in the Ontario Wait Time Strategy. Additionally, the participants identified concern for the consequences (sustainability, cannibalism, and a class system) resulting from the Ontario Wait Times Strategy.

Conclusion: We described and evaluated a wait time management initiative (the Ontario Wait Time Strategy) with special attention to public engagement, and provided a concrete plan to operationalize a strategy for improving public involvement in this, and other, wait time initiatives.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Wait Time Strategy with focus on public engagement.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238747&req=5

Figure 1: Wait Time Strategy with focus on public engagement.

Mentions: In this section we present the findings of our empirical study. This section is organized into two parts: In Part One, we describe the Ontario Wait Time Strategy (OWTS) and its broader context (see Figure 1 for a schematic overview of the wait time strategy as it pertains to this study). Specifically we provide a broad overview of the federal wait time initiative and an in-depth description of the OWTS including, the structure of the OWTS, the dissemination efforts of the OWTS, and the priority setting activities of the OWTS; In Part Two, we evaluate the wait time strategy, with special attention to public involvement, using the participants’ perspectives and ‘accountability for reasonableness’ (see Figure 2 for the conceptual frame-work), and describe consequences of the OWTS identified by the study participants.


Public involvement in the priority setting activities of a wait time management initiative: a qualitative case study.

Bruni RA, Laupacis A, Levinson W, Martin DK - BMC Health Serv Res (2007)

Wait Time Strategy with focus on public engagement.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238747&req=5

Figure 1: Wait Time Strategy with focus on public engagement.
Mentions: In this section we present the findings of our empirical study. This section is organized into two parts: In Part One, we describe the Ontario Wait Time Strategy (OWTS) and its broader context (see Figure 1 for a schematic overview of the wait time strategy as it pertains to this study). Specifically we provide a broad overview of the federal wait time initiative and an in-depth description of the OWTS including, the structure of the OWTS, the dissemination efforts of the OWTS, and the priority setting activities of the OWTS; In Part Two, we evaluate the wait time strategy, with special attention to public involvement, using the participants’ perspectives and ‘accountability for reasonableness’ (see Figure 2 for the conceptual frame-work), and describe consequences of the OWTS identified by the study participants.

Bottom Line: Study participants identified both benefits (supporting the initiative, experts of the lived experience, a publicly funded system and sustainability of the healthcare system) and concerns (personal biases, lack of interest to be involved, time constraints, and level of technicality) for public involvement in the Ontario Wait Time Strategy.Additionally, the participants identified concern for the consequences (sustainability, cannibalism, and a class system) resulting from the Ontario Wait Times Strategy.We described and evaluated a wait time management initiative (the Ontario Wait Time Strategy) with special attention to public engagement, and provided a concrete plan to operationalize a strategy for improving public involvement in this, and other, wait time initiatives.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Joint Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. rebecca.bruni@utoronto.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: As no health system can afford to provide all possible services and treatments for the people it serves, each system must set priorities. Priority setting decision makers are increasingly involving the public in policy making. This study focuses on public engagement in a key priority setting context that plagues every health system around the world: wait list management. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate priority setting for the Ontario Wait Time Strategy, with special attention to public engagement.

Methods: This study was conducted at the Ontario Wait Time Strategy in Ontario, Canada which is part of a Federal-Territorial-Provincial initiative to improve access and reduce wait times in five areas: cancer, cardiac, sight restoration, joint replacements, and diagnostic imaging. There were two sources of data: (1) over 25 documents (e.g. strategic planning reports, public updates), and (2) 28 one-on-one interviews with informants (e.g. OWTS participants, MOHLTC representatives, clinicians, patient advocates). Analysis used a modified thematic technique in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and evaluation.

Results: The Ontario Wait Time Strategy partially meets the four conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness'. The public was not directly involved in the priority setting activities of the Ontario Wait Time Strategy. Study participants identified both benefits (supporting the initiative, experts of the lived experience, a publicly funded system and sustainability of the healthcare system) and concerns (personal biases, lack of interest to be involved, time constraints, and level of technicality) for public involvement in the Ontario Wait Time Strategy. Additionally, the participants identified concern for the consequences (sustainability, cannibalism, and a class system) resulting from the Ontario Wait Times Strategy.

Conclusion: We described and evaluated a wait time management initiative (the Ontario Wait Time Strategy) with special attention to public engagement, and provided a concrete plan to operationalize a strategy for improving public involvement in this, and other, wait time initiatives.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus