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Obesity and craniofacial variables in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: comparisons of cephalometric values.

Cuccia AM, Campisi G, Cannavale R, Colella G - Head Face Med (2007)

Bottom Line: A low position of the hyoid bone was present in both groups.In non-obese patients, an increased value of the ANB angle and a reduced dimension of the cranial base (S-N) were found to be the most common finding, whereas major skeletal divergence (ANS-PNS ;Go-Me) was evident among obese patients.Unexpectedly, in obese OSAS patients, alterations of oropharyngeal soft tissue were not always present and did not prevail.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dental Sciences G.Messina, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. medicinaorale@odonto.unipa.it

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this paper was to determine the most common craniofacial changes in patients suffering Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) with regards to the degree of obesity. Accordingly, cephalometric data reported in the literature was searched and analyzed.

Methods: After a careful analysis of the literature from 1990 to 2006, 5 papers with similar procedural criteria were selected. Inclusion criteria were: recruitment of Caucasian patients with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >10 as grouped in non-obese (Body Mass Index - [BMI] < 30) vs. obese (BMI > or = 30).

Results: A low position of the hyoid bone was present in both groups. In non-obese patients, an increased value of the ANB angle and a reduced dimension of the cranial base (S-N) were found to be the most common finding, whereas major skeletal divergence (ANS-PNS ;Go-Me) was evident among obese patients. No strict association was found between OSAS and length of the soft palate.

Conclusion: In both non-obese and obese OSAS patients, skeletal changes were often evident; with special emphasis of intermaxillary divergence in obese patients. Unexpectedly, in obese OSAS patients, alterations of oropharyngeal soft tissue were not always present and did not prevail.

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Flow diagram of the selection process of studies for systematic review on cephalometric analysis on nonobese OSA patients.
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Figure 1: Flow diagram of the selection process of studies for systematic review on cephalometric analysis on nonobese OSA patients.

Mentions: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) provided one suitable result. Finally 5 studies were included in this review [21,23-26] (Fig. 1). Worthy of note, the only paper with a proper control group was published by Tangugsorn et al.[21]. The Sample size and anthropometric measurements of each study are shown in Table 1.


Obesity and craniofacial variables in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: comparisons of cephalometric values.

Cuccia AM, Campisi G, Cannavale R, Colella G - Head Face Med (2007)

Flow diagram of the selection process of studies for systematic review on cephalometric analysis on nonobese OSA patients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238737&req=5

Figure 1: Flow diagram of the selection process of studies for systematic review on cephalometric analysis on nonobese OSA patients.
Mentions: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) provided one suitable result. Finally 5 studies were included in this review [21,23-26] (Fig. 1). Worthy of note, the only paper with a proper control group was published by Tangugsorn et al.[21]. The Sample size and anthropometric measurements of each study are shown in Table 1.

Bottom Line: A low position of the hyoid bone was present in both groups.In non-obese patients, an increased value of the ANB angle and a reduced dimension of the cranial base (S-N) were found to be the most common finding, whereas major skeletal divergence (ANS-PNS ;Go-Me) was evident among obese patients.Unexpectedly, in obese OSAS patients, alterations of oropharyngeal soft tissue were not always present and did not prevail.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dental Sciences G.Messina, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. medicinaorale@odonto.unipa.it

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this paper was to determine the most common craniofacial changes in patients suffering Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) with regards to the degree of obesity. Accordingly, cephalometric data reported in the literature was searched and analyzed.

Methods: After a careful analysis of the literature from 1990 to 2006, 5 papers with similar procedural criteria were selected. Inclusion criteria were: recruitment of Caucasian patients with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >10 as grouped in non-obese (Body Mass Index - [BMI] < 30) vs. obese (BMI > or = 30).

Results: A low position of the hyoid bone was present in both groups. In non-obese patients, an increased value of the ANB angle and a reduced dimension of the cranial base (S-N) were found to be the most common finding, whereas major skeletal divergence (ANS-PNS ;Go-Me) was evident among obese patients. No strict association was found between OSAS and length of the soft palate.

Conclusion: In both non-obese and obese OSAS patients, skeletal changes were often evident; with special emphasis of intermaxillary divergence in obese patients. Unexpectedly, in obese OSAS patients, alterations of oropharyngeal soft tissue were not always present and did not prevail.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus