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Isoform-specific stimulation of cardiac Na/K pumps by nanomolar concentrations of glycosides.

Gao J, Wymore RS, Wang Y, Gaudette GR, Krukenkamp IB, Cohen IS, Mathias RT - J. Gen. Physiol. (2002)

Bottom Line: Here, we utilize the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on isolated cardiac myocytes to directly measure Na/K pump current (I(P)) in conditions that minimize the possibility of ion accumulation/depletion causing the observed effects.In the guinea pig myocytes, nanomolar ouabain as well as DHO stimulated the alpha(2)-isoform, but both the stimulatory and inhibitory concentrations of ouabain were approximately 10-fold lower than those for DHO.These observations support early reports that nanomolar concentrations of glycosides stimulate Na/K pump activity, and suggest a novel mechanism of isoform-specific regulation of I(P) in heart by nanomolar concentrations of endogenous ouabain-like molecules.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Health Sciences Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8661, USA.

ABSTRACT
It is well-known that micromolar to millimolar concentrations of cardiac glycosides inhibit Na/K pump activity, however, some early reports suggested nanomolar concentrations of these glycosides stimulate activity. These early reports were based on indirect measurements in multicellular preparations, hence, there was some uncertainty whether ion accumulation/depletion rather than pump stimulation caused the observations. Here, we utilize the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on isolated cardiac myocytes to directly measure Na/K pump current (I(P)) in conditions that minimize the possibility of ion accumulation/depletion causing the observed effects. In guinea pig ventricular myocytes, nanomolar concentrations of dihydro-ouabain (DHO) caused an outward current that appeared to be due to stimulation of I(P) because of the following: (1) it was absent in 0 mM [K(+)](o), as was I(P); (2) it was absent in 0 mM [Na(+)](i), as was I(P); (3) at reduced [Na(+)](i), the outward current was reduced in proportion to the reduction in I(P); (4) it was eliminated by intracellular vanadate, as was I(P). Our previous work suggested guinea pig ventricular myocytes coexpress the alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-isoforms of the Na/K pumps. The stimulation of I(P) appears to be through stimulation of the high glycoside affinity alpha(2)-isoform and not the alpha(1)-isoform because of the following: (1) regulatory signals that specifically increased activity of the alpha(2)-isoform increased the amplitude of the stimulation; (2) regulatory signals that specifically altered the activity of the alpha(1)-isoform did not affect the stimulation; (3) changes in [K(+)](o) that affected activity of the alpha(1)-isoform, but not the alpha(2)-isoform, did not affect the stimulation; (4) myocytes from one group of guinea pigs expressed the alpha(1)-isoform but not the alpha(2)-isoform, and these myocytes did not show the stimulation. At 10 nM DHO, total I(P) increased by 35 +/- 10% (mean +/- SD, n = 18). If one accepts the hypothesis that this increase is due to stimulation of just the alpha(2)-isoform, then activity of the alpha(2)-isoform increased by 107 +/- 30%. In the guinea pig myocytes, nanomolar ouabain as well as DHO stimulated the alpha(2)-isoform, but both the stimulatory and inhibitory concentrations of ouabain were approximately 10-fold lower than those for DHO. Stimulation of I(P) by nanomolar DHO was observed in canine atrial and ventricular myocytes, which express the alpha(1)- and alpha(3)-isoforms of the Na/K pumps, suggesting the other high glycoside affinity isoform (the alpha(3)-isoform) also was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of DHO. Human atrial and ventricular myocytes express all three isoforms, but isoform affinity for glycosides is too similar to separate their activity. Nevertheless, nanomolar DHO caused a stimulation of I(P) that was very similar to that seen in other species. Thus, in all species studied, nanomolar DHO caused stimulation of I(P), and where the contributions of the high glycoside affinity alpha(2)- and alpha(3)-isoforms could be separated from that of the alpha(1)-isoform, it was only the high glycoside affinity isoform that was stimulated. These observations support early reports that nanomolar concentrations of glycosides stimulate Na/K pump activity, and suggest a novel mechanism of isoform-specific regulation of I(P) in heart by nanomolar concentrations of endogenous ouabain-like molecules.

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ΔIP-DHO curve in guinea pig ventricular myocytes lacking the α2-isoform. The open circles and the dashed smooth curve are the same ones presented in Fig. 3 B, indicating the ΔIP-DHO curve with two isoforms (α1 and α2). The closed circles and the solid smooth curve define the ΔIP-DHO curve lacking the α2-isoform. Stimulation of IP was not observed in the guinea pig hearts lacking the α2-isoform. The curve fitting indicates only the α1-isoform was present in these cells.
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fig9: ΔIP-DHO curve in guinea pig ventricular myocytes lacking the α2-isoform. The open circles and the dashed smooth curve are the same ones presented in Fig. 3 B, indicating the ΔIP-DHO curve with two isoforms (α1 and α2). The closed circles and the solid smooth curve define the ΔIP-DHO curve lacking the α2-isoform. Stimulation of IP was not observed in the guinea pig hearts lacking the α2-isoform. The curve fitting indicates only the α1-isoform was present in these cells.

Mentions: Fig. 7 compares the ΔIP–DHO curve in Fig. 6 with that recorded in cells isolated from the guinea pig hearts without the α2-isoform. Data were collected as described in Fig. 6 A. Each point was averaged from at least five cells. No stimulation of IP was observed even at 10 nM DHO in the guinea pig hearts lacking the α2-isoform. The curve fitting indicates only IP1 (α1-isoform) was present in these cells. The value of K1 given by the fitting was 74 μM, which is almost identical to the value (72 μM) we reported previously (Gao et al., 1995). These results suggest that when the α2-isoform is absent, there is no stimulation of IP, and strengthen the suggestion that the stimulation of IP involves only the α2-isoform, and not the α1-isoform.


Isoform-specific stimulation of cardiac Na/K pumps by nanomolar concentrations of glycosides.

Gao J, Wymore RS, Wang Y, Gaudette GR, Krukenkamp IB, Cohen IS, Mathias RT - J. Gen. Physiol. (2002)

ΔIP-DHO curve in guinea pig ventricular myocytes lacking the α2-isoform. The open circles and the dashed smooth curve are the same ones presented in Fig. 3 B, indicating the ΔIP-DHO curve with two isoforms (α1 and α2). The closed circles and the solid smooth curve define the ΔIP-DHO curve lacking the α2-isoform. Stimulation of IP was not observed in the guinea pig hearts lacking the α2-isoform. The curve fitting indicates only the α1-isoform was present in these cells.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2238186&req=5

fig9: ΔIP-DHO curve in guinea pig ventricular myocytes lacking the α2-isoform. The open circles and the dashed smooth curve are the same ones presented in Fig. 3 B, indicating the ΔIP-DHO curve with two isoforms (α1 and α2). The closed circles and the solid smooth curve define the ΔIP-DHO curve lacking the α2-isoform. Stimulation of IP was not observed in the guinea pig hearts lacking the α2-isoform. The curve fitting indicates only the α1-isoform was present in these cells.
Mentions: Fig. 7 compares the ΔIP–DHO curve in Fig. 6 with that recorded in cells isolated from the guinea pig hearts without the α2-isoform. Data were collected as described in Fig. 6 A. Each point was averaged from at least five cells. No stimulation of IP was observed even at 10 nM DHO in the guinea pig hearts lacking the α2-isoform. The curve fitting indicates only IP1 (α1-isoform) was present in these cells. The value of K1 given by the fitting was 74 μM, which is almost identical to the value (72 μM) we reported previously (Gao et al., 1995). These results suggest that when the α2-isoform is absent, there is no stimulation of IP, and strengthen the suggestion that the stimulation of IP involves only the α2-isoform, and not the α1-isoform.

Bottom Line: Here, we utilize the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on isolated cardiac myocytes to directly measure Na/K pump current (I(P)) in conditions that minimize the possibility of ion accumulation/depletion causing the observed effects.In the guinea pig myocytes, nanomolar ouabain as well as DHO stimulated the alpha(2)-isoform, but both the stimulatory and inhibitory concentrations of ouabain were approximately 10-fold lower than those for DHO.These observations support early reports that nanomolar concentrations of glycosides stimulate Na/K pump activity, and suggest a novel mechanism of isoform-specific regulation of I(P) in heart by nanomolar concentrations of endogenous ouabain-like molecules.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Health Sciences Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8661, USA.

ABSTRACT
It is well-known that micromolar to millimolar concentrations of cardiac glycosides inhibit Na/K pump activity, however, some early reports suggested nanomolar concentrations of these glycosides stimulate activity. These early reports were based on indirect measurements in multicellular preparations, hence, there was some uncertainty whether ion accumulation/depletion rather than pump stimulation caused the observations. Here, we utilize the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on isolated cardiac myocytes to directly measure Na/K pump current (I(P)) in conditions that minimize the possibility of ion accumulation/depletion causing the observed effects. In guinea pig ventricular myocytes, nanomolar concentrations of dihydro-ouabain (DHO) caused an outward current that appeared to be due to stimulation of I(P) because of the following: (1) it was absent in 0 mM [K(+)](o), as was I(P); (2) it was absent in 0 mM [Na(+)](i), as was I(P); (3) at reduced [Na(+)](i), the outward current was reduced in proportion to the reduction in I(P); (4) it was eliminated by intracellular vanadate, as was I(P). Our previous work suggested guinea pig ventricular myocytes coexpress the alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-isoforms of the Na/K pumps. The stimulation of I(P) appears to be through stimulation of the high glycoside affinity alpha(2)-isoform and not the alpha(1)-isoform because of the following: (1) regulatory signals that specifically increased activity of the alpha(2)-isoform increased the amplitude of the stimulation; (2) regulatory signals that specifically altered the activity of the alpha(1)-isoform did not affect the stimulation; (3) changes in [K(+)](o) that affected activity of the alpha(1)-isoform, but not the alpha(2)-isoform, did not affect the stimulation; (4) myocytes from one group of guinea pigs expressed the alpha(1)-isoform but not the alpha(2)-isoform, and these myocytes did not show the stimulation. At 10 nM DHO, total I(P) increased by 35 +/- 10% (mean +/- SD, n = 18). If one accepts the hypothesis that this increase is due to stimulation of just the alpha(2)-isoform, then activity of the alpha(2)-isoform increased by 107 +/- 30%. In the guinea pig myocytes, nanomolar ouabain as well as DHO stimulated the alpha(2)-isoform, but both the stimulatory and inhibitory concentrations of ouabain were approximately 10-fold lower than those for DHO. Stimulation of I(P) by nanomolar DHO was observed in canine atrial and ventricular myocytes, which express the alpha(1)- and alpha(3)-isoforms of the Na/K pumps, suggesting the other high glycoside affinity isoform (the alpha(3)-isoform) also was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of DHO. Human atrial and ventricular myocytes express all three isoforms, but isoform affinity for glycosides is too similar to separate their activity. Nevertheless, nanomolar DHO caused a stimulation of I(P) that was very similar to that seen in other species. Thus, in all species studied, nanomolar DHO caused stimulation of I(P), and where the contributions of the high glycoside affinity alpha(2)- and alpha(3)-isoforms could be separated from that of the alpha(1)-isoform, it was only the high glycoside affinity isoform that was stimulated. These observations support early reports that nanomolar concentrations of glycosides stimulate Na/K pump activity, and suggest a novel mechanism of isoform-specific regulation of I(P) in heart by nanomolar concentrations of endogenous ouabain-like molecules.

Show MeSH