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Synthesis, X-ray structure, and characterization of a complex containing the hexakis(urea)cobalt(II) cation and lattice urea molecules.

Drakopoulou L, Papatriantafyllopoulou C, Terzis A, Perlepes SP, Manessi-Zoupa E, Papaefstathiou GS - Bioinorg Chem Appl (2007)

Bottom Line: The I(-) anions are placed above and below each layer, and are hydrogen bonded both to U(1) molecules and [CoU(6)](2+) cations.Each U(2) molecule is connected to a [CoU(6)](2+) cation through an N-Hcdots, three dots, centeredO hydrogen bond resulting in a three-dimensional network.Room temperature magnetic susceptibility and spectroscopic (solid-state UV/Vis, IR, Raman) data of 1 are discussed in terms of the nature of bonding and the known structure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, 265 04 Patras, Greece. lisa-landrum@ouhsc.edu

ABSTRACT
The 12: 1 reaction of urea (U) with CoI(2) in EtOH yielded the "clathrate-coordination" compound [CoU(6)]I2.4U (1). The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c. The lattice constants are a = 9.844(4), b = 7.268(3), c = 24.12(1) A, and beta=98.12(1) degrees composite function. The crystal structure determination demonstrates the existence of octahedral [CoU6](2+) cations, I(-) counterions, and two different types (two U(1) and two U(2)) of hydrogen-bonded, lattice urea molecules. The [CoU(6)](2+) cations and the U(1) lattice molecules form two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded layers which are parallel to the ab plane. The I(-) anions are placed above and below each layer, and are hydrogen bonded both to U(1) molecules and [CoU(6)](2+) cations. Each U(2) molecule is connected to a [CoU(6)](2+) cation through an N-Hcdots, three dots, centeredO hydrogen bond resulting in a three-dimensional network. Room temperature magnetic susceptibility and spectroscopic (solid-state UV/Vis, IR, Raman) data of 1 are discussed in terms of the nature of bonding and the known structure.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic representation of the active site of urease.
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fig1: Schematic representation of the active site of urease.

Mentions: Urea,H2NCONH2 (hereafter abbreviated as U), is a very oldcompound, first isolated by Rouelle in 1773 and subsequently synthesized frominorganic materials by Wöhler in 1828. There is a renewed interest in thecoordination chemistry of U and its substituted derivatives. These efforts aredriven by a number of considerations, including the solution of pure chemical[1] and spectroscopic [2] problems, the desire to provide useful bioinorganicmodels for the intermediates in the catalytic mechanism of the metalloenzymeurease (for its active site see Scheme 1) [3, 4], and the goal to isolatefunctional complexes with interesting supramolecular structures [5].Single-crystal X-ray crystallography has revealed [6] that U normallycoordinates as a monodentate ligand through the oxygen atom (I in Scheme 2). In a very limitednumber of cases [7, 8], U behaves as an N,O-bidentate bridging ligand (II in Scheme 2), while in [Hg2Cl4U2]each U molecule bridges the two HgII atoms through only the oxygenatom [9] (III in Scheme 2). Ofparticular chemical/biological interest is the ability of U to undergometal-promoted deprotonation [3, 10]; the monoanionic ligand H2NCONH− adopts the (IV in Scheme 2) and (V in Scheme 2) coordination modes.


Synthesis, X-ray structure, and characterization of a complex containing the hexakis(urea)cobalt(II) cation and lattice urea molecules.

Drakopoulou L, Papatriantafyllopoulou C, Terzis A, Perlepes SP, Manessi-Zoupa E, Papaefstathiou GS - Bioinorg Chem Appl (2007)

Schematic representation of the active site of urease.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2235932&req=5

fig1: Schematic representation of the active site of urease.
Mentions: Urea,H2NCONH2 (hereafter abbreviated as U), is a very oldcompound, first isolated by Rouelle in 1773 and subsequently synthesized frominorganic materials by Wöhler in 1828. There is a renewed interest in thecoordination chemistry of U and its substituted derivatives. These efforts aredriven by a number of considerations, including the solution of pure chemical[1] and spectroscopic [2] problems, the desire to provide useful bioinorganicmodels for the intermediates in the catalytic mechanism of the metalloenzymeurease (for its active site see Scheme 1) [3, 4], and the goal to isolatefunctional complexes with interesting supramolecular structures [5].Single-crystal X-ray crystallography has revealed [6] that U normallycoordinates as a monodentate ligand through the oxygen atom (I in Scheme 2). In a very limitednumber of cases [7, 8], U behaves as an N,O-bidentate bridging ligand (II in Scheme 2), while in [Hg2Cl4U2]each U molecule bridges the two HgII atoms through only the oxygenatom [9] (III in Scheme 2). Ofparticular chemical/biological interest is the ability of U to undergometal-promoted deprotonation [3, 10]; the monoanionic ligand H2NCONH− adopts the (IV in Scheme 2) and (V in Scheme 2) coordination modes.

Bottom Line: The I(-) anions are placed above and below each layer, and are hydrogen bonded both to U(1) molecules and [CoU(6)](2+) cations.Each U(2) molecule is connected to a [CoU(6)](2+) cation through an N-Hcdots, three dots, centeredO hydrogen bond resulting in a three-dimensional network.Room temperature magnetic susceptibility and spectroscopic (solid-state UV/Vis, IR, Raman) data of 1 are discussed in terms of the nature of bonding and the known structure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, 265 04 Patras, Greece. lisa-landrum@ouhsc.edu

ABSTRACT
The 12: 1 reaction of urea (U) with CoI(2) in EtOH yielded the "clathrate-coordination" compound [CoU(6)]I2.4U (1). The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c. The lattice constants are a = 9.844(4), b = 7.268(3), c = 24.12(1) A, and beta=98.12(1) degrees composite function. The crystal structure determination demonstrates the existence of octahedral [CoU6](2+) cations, I(-) counterions, and two different types (two U(1) and two U(2)) of hydrogen-bonded, lattice urea molecules. The [CoU(6)](2+) cations and the U(1) lattice molecules form two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded layers which are parallel to the ab plane. The I(-) anions are placed above and below each layer, and are hydrogen bonded both to U(1) molecules and [CoU(6)](2+) cations. Each U(2) molecule is connected to a [CoU(6)](2+) cation through an N-Hcdots, three dots, centeredO hydrogen bond resulting in a three-dimensional network. Room temperature magnetic susceptibility and spectroscopic (solid-state UV/Vis, IR, Raman) data of 1 are discussed in terms of the nature of bonding and the known structure.

No MeSH data available.