Limits...
The development and preliminary validation of a Preference-Based Stroke Index (PBSI).

Poissant L, Mayo NE, Wood-Dauphinee S, Clarke AE - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2003)

Bottom Line: Moderately high correlations were found between the physical function (r = 0.78), vitality (r = 0.67), social functioning (r = 0.64) scales of the SF-36 and the PBSI.Content validity and preliminary evidence of construct validity has been demonstrated.Further work is needed to develop a multiattribute utility function to gather information on psychometric properties of the PBSI.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: McGill University, Health Informatics Research Group, 1140 Pine Ave West, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 1A3, Canada. lise.poissant@mcgill.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is a key issue in disabling conditions like stroke. Unfortunately, HRQL is often difficult to quantify in a comprehensive measure that can be used in cost analyses. Preference-based HRQL measures meet this challenge. To date, there are no existing preference-based HRQL measure for stroke that could be used as an outcome in clinical and economic studies of stroke. The aim of this study was to develop the first stroke-specific health index, the Preference-based Stroke Index (PBSI).

Methods: The PBSI includes 10 items; walking, climbing stairs, physical activities/sports, recreational activities, work, driving, speech, memory, coping and self-esteem. Each item has a 3-point response scale. Items known to be impacted by a stroke were selected. Scaling properties and preference-weights obtained from individuals with stroke and their caregivers were used to develop a cumulative score.

Results: Compared to the EQ-5D, the PBSI showed no ceiling effect in a high-functioning stroke population. Moderately high correlations were found between the physical function (r = 0.78), vitality (r = 0.67), social functioning (r = 0.64) scales of the SF-36 and the PBSI. The lowest correlation was with the role emotional scale of the SF-36 (r = 0.32). Our results indicated that the PBSI can differentiate patients by severity of stroke (p < 0.05) and level of functional independence (p < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Content validity and preliminary evidence of construct validity has been demonstrated. Further work is needed to develop a multiattribute utility function to gather information on psychometric properties of the PBSI.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean VAS rating scores of response options on English questionnaires (n = 29)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC222917&req=5

Figure 1: Mean VAS rating scores of response options on English questionnaires (n = 29)

Mentions: In order to facilitate ease of completion, a three-point scale was the goal. Descriptive statements reflecting three different levels of observable functions of community living stroke survivors were generated for each of the remaining items. For example, the worst level of the walking item was described as being able to walk only a few steps or using a wheelchair. Because of the specificity of each descriptive statement for a given item, ordinality of the 3-point scale was tested. A convenience sample of 29 undergraduate students rated each descriptive statement on a 10 cm long visual analog scale (VAS) [38]. Anchors varied in relation to the item. For example, the anchors for the walking statements were 0=unable to walk and 10= able to walk normally. Since there were 10 items with 3 descriptive statements each, students were asked to rate 30 randomly organized statements. Following comments and ratings, some statements were reworded. Figure 1 shows the mean VAS ratings.


The development and preliminary validation of a Preference-Based Stroke Index (PBSI).

Poissant L, Mayo NE, Wood-Dauphinee S, Clarke AE - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2003)

Mean VAS rating scores of response options on English questionnaires (n = 29)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC222917&req=5

Figure 1: Mean VAS rating scores of response options on English questionnaires (n = 29)
Mentions: In order to facilitate ease of completion, a three-point scale was the goal. Descriptive statements reflecting three different levels of observable functions of community living stroke survivors were generated for each of the remaining items. For example, the worst level of the walking item was described as being able to walk only a few steps or using a wheelchair. Because of the specificity of each descriptive statement for a given item, ordinality of the 3-point scale was tested. A convenience sample of 29 undergraduate students rated each descriptive statement on a 10 cm long visual analog scale (VAS) [38]. Anchors varied in relation to the item. For example, the anchors for the walking statements were 0=unable to walk and 10= able to walk normally. Since there were 10 items with 3 descriptive statements each, students were asked to rate 30 randomly organized statements. Following comments and ratings, some statements were reworded. Figure 1 shows the mean VAS ratings.

Bottom Line: Moderately high correlations were found between the physical function (r = 0.78), vitality (r = 0.67), social functioning (r = 0.64) scales of the SF-36 and the PBSI.Content validity and preliminary evidence of construct validity has been demonstrated.Further work is needed to develop a multiattribute utility function to gather information on psychometric properties of the PBSI.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: McGill University, Health Informatics Research Group, 1140 Pine Ave West, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 1A3, Canada. lise.poissant@mcgill.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is a key issue in disabling conditions like stroke. Unfortunately, HRQL is often difficult to quantify in a comprehensive measure that can be used in cost analyses. Preference-based HRQL measures meet this challenge. To date, there are no existing preference-based HRQL measure for stroke that could be used as an outcome in clinical and economic studies of stroke. The aim of this study was to develop the first stroke-specific health index, the Preference-based Stroke Index (PBSI).

Methods: The PBSI includes 10 items; walking, climbing stairs, physical activities/sports, recreational activities, work, driving, speech, memory, coping and self-esteem. Each item has a 3-point response scale. Items known to be impacted by a stroke were selected. Scaling properties and preference-weights obtained from individuals with stroke and their caregivers were used to develop a cumulative score.

Results: Compared to the EQ-5D, the PBSI showed no ceiling effect in a high-functioning stroke population. Moderately high correlations were found between the physical function (r = 0.78), vitality (r = 0.67), social functioning (r = 0.64) scales of the SF-36 and the PBSI. The lowest correlation was with the role emotional scale of the SF-36 (r = 0.32). Our results indicated that the PBSI can differentiate patients by severity of stroke (p < 0.05) and level of functional independence (p < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Content validity and preliminary evidence of construct validity has been demonstrated. Further work is needed to develop a multiattribute utility function to gather information on psychometric properties of the PBSI.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus