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Oil palm research in context: identifying the need for biodiversity assessment.

Turner EC, Snaddon JL, Fayle TM, Foster WA - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: In the context of global vegetable oil markets, palm oil and soyabean account for over 60% of production but are the subject of less than 10% of research.Much more work must be done to establish the impacts of habitat conversion to oil palm plantation on biodiversity.Results from such studies are crucial for informing conservation strategies and ensuring sustainable management of plantations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Insect Ecology Group, University Museum of Zoology, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Oil palm cultivation is frequently cited as a major threat to tropical biodiversity as it is centered on some of the world's most biodiverse regions. In this report, Web of Science was used to find papers on oil palm published since 1970, which were assigned to different subject categories to visualize their research focus. Recent years have seen a broadening in the scope of research, with a slight growth in publications on the environment and a dramatic increase in those on biofuel. Despite this, less than 1% of publications are related to biodiversity and species conservation. In the context of global vegetable oil markets, palm oil and soyabean account for over 60% of production but are the subject of less than 10% of research. Much more work must be done to establish the impacts of habitat conversion to oil palm plantation on biodiversity. Results from such studies are crucial for informing conservation strategies and ensuring sustainable management of plantations.

Show MeSH
Oil yield from top eight crops in 2005 [2] in relation to total number of publications on each crop.Publication frequency between 1970 and 2006 was assessed using Web of Science [7].
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pone-0001572-g003: Oil yield from top eight crops in 2005 [2] in relation to total number of publications on each crop.Publication frequency between 1970 and 2006 was assessed using Web of Science [7].

Mentions: The number of oil palm publications relative to those on agriculture has fluctuated considerably over time but has shown a net increase. In contrast, the number of publications relative to oil palm production has shown a net decrease (Fig 2). Despite being a major source of vegetable oil worldwide, oil palm has attracted relatively little research interest compared to other oil crops. Palm oil and soyabean contribute over 60% to the world's vegetable oil production but have less than 10% of the research interest (Fig. 3). Over the last 35 years, the major focus of oil palm research has been its uses in food and the resultant health issues (22.19% of total, 678 publications). In the last ten years there has been a marked increase in the number of publications on i) byproducts from the oil palm industry, ii) chemistry, engineering and biotechnology, and iii) the production of biofuel. The number of publications on biodiversity (0.75% of total, 23 publications) and other environmental issues (2.06% of total, 63 publications) has been extremely low (Fig. 4).


Oil palm research in context: identifying the need for biodiversity assessment.

Turner EC, Snaddon JL, Fayle TM, Foster WA - PLoS ONE (2008)

Oil yield from top eight crops in 2005 [2] in relation to total number of publications on each crop.Publication frequency between 1970 and 2006 was assessed using Web of Science [7].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2215746&req=5

pone-0001572-g003: Oil yield from top eight crops in 2005 [2] in relation to total number of publications on each crop.Publication frequency between 1970 and 2006 was assessed using Web of Science [7].
Mentions: The number of oil palm publications relative to those on agriculture has fluctuated considerably over time but has shown a net increase. In contrast, the number of publications relative to oil palm production has shown a net decrease (Fig 2). Despite being a major source of vegetable oil worldwide, oil palm has attracted relatively little research interest compared to other oil crops. Palm oil and soyabean contribute over 60% to the world's vegetable oil production but have less than 10% of the research interest (Fig. 3). Over the last 35 years, the major focus of oil palm research has been its uses in food and the resultant health issues (22.19% of total, 678 publications). In the last ten years there has been a marked increase in the number of publications on i) byproducts from the oil palm industry, ii) chemistry, engineering and biotechnology, and iii) the production of biofuel. The number of publications on biodiversity (0.75% of total, 23 publications) and other environmental issues (2.06% of total, 63 publications) has been extremely low (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: In the context of global vegetable oil markets, palm oil and soyabean account for over 60% of production but are the subject of less than 10% of research.Much more work must be done to establish the impacts of habitat conversion to oil palm plantation on biodiversity.Results from such studies are crucial for informing conservation strategies and ensuring sustainable management of plantations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Insect Ecology Group, University Museum of Zoology, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Oil palm cultivation is frequently cited as a major threat to tropical biodiversity as it is centered on some of the world's most biodiverse regions. In this report, Web of Science was used to find papers on oil palm published since 1970, which were assigned to different subject categories to visualize their research focus. Recent years have seen a broadening in the scope of research, with a slight growth in publications on the environment and a dramatic increase in those on biofuel. Despite this, less than 1% of publications are related to biodiversity and species conservation. In the context of global vegetable oil markets, palm oil and soyabean account for over 60% of production but are the subject of less than 10% of research. Much more work must be done to establish the impacts of habitat conversion to oil palm plantation on biodiversity. Results from such studies are crucial for informing conservation strategies and ensuring sustainable management of plantations.

Show MeSH