Limits...
Pilot feasibility study of an emergency paediatric kit for intra-rectal quinine administration used by the personnel of community-based health care units in Senegal.

Ndiaye JL, Tine RC, Faye B, Dieye el HL, Diack PA, Lameyre V, Gaye O, Sow HD - Malar. J. (2007)

Bottom Line: Complete parasite clearance was obtained in all patients by Day 7.The kit was well accepted by all concerned and more than 80% of community health workers judged the kit easy to use.It is feasible and easy to use for health workers in community-based Health Units where, according to the WHO, nearly 80% of malarial morbidity and mortality occurs.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Service de Parasitologie, Faculté de Médecine, Université Cheikh Anta DIOP de Dakar, Senegal. jlndiaye@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Quinine injection is the reference treatment for malaria when oral administration is impossible. Quinine can also be administered by the intra-rectal route and, over the last ten years, a series of studies have been conducted in children to determine the ideal dose and dilution in the African situation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of a kit for an immediate administration of quinine alkaloids (Quinimax) by community health workers, prior to transfer of the child to a more sophisticated health care establishment.

Methods: A prospective, open, descriptive community intervention study conducted in northern Senegal at six village Health Units in children fewer than ten years of age with non-per-os malaria. Controls were given the routine care prior to transfer to a Health Center, and cases were in addition administered Quinimax (20 mg/ml) via the intra-rectal route before transfer. Patients were followed through complete cure and parasitological tests were carried out on Days 0, 3 and 7.

Results: 134 patients (79 cases/55 controls) were recruited between November 2003 and May 2004 or October and November 2004. The two groups were comparable at inclusion. In the case group, oral drugs could be administered after a mean of 16.8 hours versus 33.6 hours in the control group. Time-to cure was shorter in cases than in controls. Complete parasite clearance was obtained in all patients by Day 7. The kit was well accepted by all concerned and more than 80% of community health workers judged the kit easy to use.

Conclusion: The emergency paediatric kit is a useful tool in the management of malaria in children who cannot be treated orally. It is feasible and easy to use for health workers in community-based Health Units where, according to the WHO, nearly 80% of malarial morbidity and mortality occurs.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of patients with fever.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2211493&req=5

Figure 1: Percentage of patients with fever.

Mentions: On Day 1, fewer cases than controls had fever (71.4% versus 93.0%). This difference persisted through Day 2 but had disappeared by Day 3 (Figure 1).


Pilot feasibility study of an emergency paediatric kit for intra-rectal quinine administration used by the personnel of community-based health care units in Senegal.

Ndiaye JL, Tine RC, Faye B, Dieye el HL, Diack PA, Lameyre V, Gaye O, Sow HD - Malar. J. (2007)

Percentage of patients with fever.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2211493&req=5

Figure 1: Percentage of patients with fever.
Mentions: On Day 1, fewer cases than controls had fever (71.4% versus 93.0%). This difference persisted through Day 2 but had disappeared by Day 3 (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Complete parasite clearance was obtained in all patients by Day 7.The kit was well accepted by all concerned and more than 80% of community health workers judged the kit easy to use.It is feasible and easy to use for health workers in community-based Health Units where, according to the WHO, nearly 80% of malarial morbidity and mortality occurs.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Service de Parasitologie, Faculté de Médecine, Université Cheikh Anta DIOP de Dakar, Senegal. jlndiaye@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Quinine injection is the reference treatment for malaria when oral administration is impossible. Quinine can also be administered by the intra-rectal route and, over the last ten years, a series of studies have been conducted in children to determine the ideal dose and dilution in the African situation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of a kit for an immediate administration of quinine alkaloids (Quinimax) by community health workers, prior to transfer of the child to a more sophisticated health care establishment.

Methods: A prospective, open, descriptive community intervention study conducted in northern Senegal at six village Health Units in children fewer than ten years of age with non-per-os malaria. Controls were given the routine care prior to transfer to a Health Center, and cases were in addition administered Quinimax (20 mg/ml) via the intra-rectal route before transfer. Patients were followed through complete cure and parasitological tests were carried out on Days 0, 3 and 7.

Results: 134 patients (79 cases/55 controls) were recruited between November 2003 and May 2004 or October and November 2004. The two groups were comparable at inclusion. In the case group, oral drugs could be administered after a mean of 16.8 hours versus 33.6 hours in the control group. Time-to cure was shorter in cases than in controls. Complete parasite clearance was obtained in all patients by Day 7. The kit was well accepted by all concerned and more than 80% of community health workers judged the kit easy to use.

Conclusion: The emergency paediatric kit is a useful tool in the management of malaria in children who cannot be treated orally. It is feasible and easy to use for health workers in community-based Health Units where, according to the WHO, nearly 80% of malarial morbidity and mortality occurs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus