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Benefits of stimulus congruency for multisensory facilitation of visual learning.

Kim RS, Seitz AR, Shams L - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: However, multisensory interactions are ubiquitous in perception, even at early processing stages, and thus can potentially play a role in learning.Here, we examine the effect of auditory-visual congruency on visual learning.Subjects were trained over five days on a visual motion coherence detection task with either congruent audiovisual, or incongruent audiovisual stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies of perceptual learning have largely focused on unisensory stimuli. However, multisensory interactions are ubiquitous in perception, even at early processing stages, and thus can potentially play a role in learning. Here, we examine the effect of auditory-visual congruency on visual learning.

Methodology/principle findings: Subjects were trained over five days on a visual motion coherence detection task with either congruent audiovisual, or incongruent audiovisual stimuli. Comparing performance on visual-only trials, we find that training with congruent audiovisual stimuli produces significantly better learning than training with incongruent audiovisual stimuli or with only visual stimuli.

Conclusions/significance: This advantage from stimulus congruency during training suggests that the benefits of multisensory training may result from audiovisual interactions at a perceptual rather than cognitive level.

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Task Schematic.Cartoon depiction of one trial for each training condition. Arrows indicate motion direction of dots, with coherently moving dots represented by blue colored arrows for illustration purposes (in the second interval for these examples). The top row shows one trial for the unisensory (Visual) group, the second row for the congruent multisensory group, and the third for the incongruent multisensory group.
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pone-0001532-g001: Task Schematic.Cartoon depiction of one trial for each training condition. Arrows indicate motion direction of dots, with coherently moving dots represented by blue colored arrows for illustration purposes (in the second interval for these examples). The top row shows one trial for the unisensory (Visual) group, the second row for the congruent multisensory group, and the third for the incongruent multisensory group.

Mentions: The task consisted of a two-interval forced-choice task in which observers reported in which interval (first or second) they detected a directional stimulus by pressing keys on the keyboard (‘a’ for the first interval, ‘z’ for the second). As shown in Figure 1, each trial consisted of a sequence of two visual or audiovisual stimuli (described in more detail in Visual Stimuli and Auditory Stimuli below). In one interval, the stimulus contained directional motion, in the other it contained random motion. After presentation of the two intervals, participants were cued to respond whether they detected motion in the first or the second stimulus-interval. Participants were told they could answer based on either visual or auditory stimulus. Feedback was provided immediately after their response.


Benefits of stimulus congruency for multisensory facilitation of visual learning.

Kim RS, Seitz AR, Shams L - PLoS ONE (2008)

Task Schematic.Cartoon depiction of one trial for each training condition. Arrows indicate motion direction of dots, with coherently moving dots represented by blue colored arrows for illustration purposes (in the second interval for these examples). The top row shows one trial for the unisensory (Visual) group, the second row for the congruent multisensory group, and the third for the incongruent multisensory group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2211398&req=5

pone-0001532-g001: Task Schematic.Cartoon depiction of one trial for each training condition. Arrows indicate motion direction of dots, with coherently moving dots represented by blue colored arrows for illustration purposes (in the second interval for these examples). The top row shows one trial for the unisensory (Visual) group, the second row for the congruent multisensory group, and the third for the incongruent multisensory group.
Mentions: The task consisted of a two-interval forced-choice task in which observers reported in which interval (first or second) they detected a directional stimulus by pressing keys on the keyboard (‘a’ for the first interval, ‘z’ for the second). As shown in Figure 1, each trial consisted of a sequence of two visual or audiovisual stimuli (described in more detail in Visual Stimuli and Auditory Stimuli below). In one interval, the stimulus contained directional motion, in the other it contained random motion. After presentation of the two intervals, participants were cued to respond whether they detected motion in the first or the second stimulus-interval. Participants were told they could answer based on either visual or auditory stimulus. Feedback was provided immediately after their response.

Bottom Line: However, multisensory interactions are ubiquitous in perception, even at early processing stages, and thus can potentially play a role in learning.Here, we examine the effect of auditory-visual congruency on visual learning.Subjects were trained over five days on a visual motion coherence detection task with either congruent audiovisual, or incongruent audiovisual stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies of perceptual learning have largely focused on unisensory stimuli. However, multisensory interactions are ubiquitous in perception, even at early processing stages, and thus can potentially play a role in learning. Here, we examine the effect of auditory-visual congruency on visual learning.

Methodology/principle findings: Subjects were trained over five days on a visual motion coherence detection task with either congruent audiovisual, or incongruent audiovisual stimuli. Comparing performance on visual-only trials, we find that training with congruent audiovisual stimuli produces significantly better learning than training with incongruent audiovisual stimuli or with only visual stimuli.

Conclusions/significance: This advantage from stimulus congruency during training suggests that the benefits of multisensory training may result from audiovisual interactions at a perceptual rather than cognitive level.

Show MeSH