Limits...
Comparison of envelope-related genes in unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria.

Yang Y, Qin S, Zhao F, Chi X, Zhang X - Comp. Funct. Genomics (2007)

Bottom Line: Hundreds of envelope biogenesis genes were divided into 5 major groups and annotated according to their conserved domains and phylogenetic profiles.Compared to unicellular species, the gene numbers of filamentous cyanobacteria expanded due to genome enlargement effect, but only few gene families amplified disproportionately, such as those encoding waaG and glycosyl transferase 2.Comparison of envelope genes among various species suggested that the significant variance of certain cyanobacterial envelope biogenesis genes should be the response to their environmental adaptation, which might be also related to the emergence of filamentous shapes with some new functions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China.

ABSTRACT
To elucidate the evolution of cyanobacterial envelopes and the relation between gene content and environmental adaptation, cell envelope structures and components of unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria were analyzed in comparative genomics. Hundreds of envelope biogenesis genes were divided into 5 major groups and annotated according to their conserved domains and phylogenetic profiles. Compared to unicellular species, the gene numbers of filamentous cyanobacteria expanded due to genome enlargement effect, but only few gene families amplified disproportionately, such as those encoding waaG and glycosyl transferase 2. Comparison of envelope genes among various species suggested that the significant variance of certain cyanobacterial envelope biogenesis genes should be the response to their environmental adaptation, which might be also related to the emergence of filamentous shapes with some new functions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Multiple sequence alignments of the 43 waaG homologous genes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Only most conserved areas were shown. The number following the genus name was the gene accession in IMG database. NCBI accessions and other information of genes were provided in Table 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2211374&req=5

fig1: Multiple sequence alignments of the 43 waaG homologous genes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Only most conserved areas were shown. The number following the genus name was the gene accession in IMG database. NCBI accessions and other information of genes were provided in Table 2.

Mentions: In terms of absolute amounts, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 had most of the LBR genes. Interesting is that most increased genes had the common conserved domain waaG (formerly RfaG). There were 43 waaG-containing genes found in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (while only 5 in Prochlorococcus marinus MED4, 17 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and 24 in Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101). The 43 genes and their multiple alignments in similar domain were shown in Table 2 and Figure 1, about 20 residues out of the 43 sequences were in common (black shading areas). These residues may have formed typical spatial structures that could be defined as active sites of waaG domain.


Comparison of envelope-related genes in unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria.

Yang Y, Qin S, Zhao F, Chi X, Zhang X - Comp. Funct. Genomics (2007)

Multiple sequence alignments of the 43 waaG homologous genes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Only most conserved areas were shown. The number following the genus name was the gene accession in IMG database. NCBI accessions and other information of genes were provided in Table 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2211374&req=5

fig1: Multiple sequence alignments of the 43 waaG homologous genes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Only most conserved areas were shown. The number following the genus name was the gene accession in IMG database. NCBI accessions and other information of genes were provided in Table 2.
Mentions: In terms of absolute amounts, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 had most of the LBR genes. Interesting is that most increased genes had the common conserved domain waaG (formerly RfaG). There were 43 waaG-containing genes found in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (while only 5 in Prochlorococcus marinus MED4, 17 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and 24 in Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101). The 43 genes and their multiple alignments in similar domain were shown in Table 2 and Figure 1, about 20 residues out of the 43 sequences were in common (black shading areas). These residues may have formed typical spatial structures that could be defined as active sites of waaG domain.

Bottom Line: Hundreds of envelope biogenesis genes were divided into 5 major groups and annotated according to their conserved domains and phylogenetic profiles.Compared to unicellular species, the gene numbers of filamentous cyanobacteria expanded due to genome enlargement effect, but only few gene families amplified disproportionately, such as those encoding waaG and glycosyl transferase 2.Comparison of envelope genes among various species suggested that the significant variance of certain cyanobacterial envelope biogenesis genes should be the response to their environmental adaptation, which might be also related to the emergence of filamentous shapes with some new functions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China.

ABSTRACT
To elucidate the evolution of cyanobacterial envelopes and the relation between gene content and environmental adaptation, cell envelope structures and components of unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria were analyzed in comparative genomics. Hundreds of envelope biogenesis genes were divided into 5 major groups and annotated according to their conserved domains and phylogenetic profiles. Compared to unicellular species, the gene numbers of filamentous cyanobacteria expanded due to genome enlargement effect, but only few gene families amplified disproportionately, such as those encoding waaG and glycosyl transferase 2. Comparison of envelope genes among various species suggested that the significant variance of certain cyanobacterial envelope biogenesis genes should be the response to their environmental adaptation, which might be also related to the emergence of filamentous shapes with some new functions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus