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Predilection muscles and physical condition of raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) experimentally infected with Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella nativa.

Mikkonen T, Oivanen L, Näreaho A, Helin H, Sukura A - Acta Vet. Scand. (2001)

Bottom Line: Larvae were found in all sampled skeleton muscles of the infected animals, but not in the specimens from the heart or intestinal musculature.There were no significant differences in the predilection sites between these 2 parasite species.Thus, Trichinella as a muscle parasite might have catabolic effect on these animals.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. taina.mikkonen@helsinki.fi

ABSTRACT
The predilection muscles of Trichinella spiralis and T. nativa were studied in 2 experimental groups of 6 raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides), the third group serving as a control for clinical signs. The infection dose for both parasites was 1 larva/g body weight. After 12 weeks, the animals were euthanized and 13 sampling sites were analysed by the digestion method. Larvae were found in all sampled skeleton muscles of the infected animals, but not in the specimens from the heart or intestinal musculature. Both parasite species reproduced equally well in the raccoon dog. The median density of infection in positive tissues was 353 larvae per gram (lpg) with T. spiralis and 343 lpg with T. nativa. All the infected animals had the highest larvae numbers in the carpal flexors (M. flexor carpi ulnaris). Also tongue and eye muscles had high infection levels. There were no significant differences in the predilection sites between these 2 parasite species. Trichinellosis increased the relative amount of fat, but not the body weight in the captive raccoon dogs. Thus, Trichinella as a muscle parasite might have catabolic effect on these animals.

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Distribution of Trichinella spiralis and T. nativa in all positive muscle samples. Numbers given represent the relative number of muscle larvae in the raccoon dogs.
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Figure 1: Distribution of Trichinella spiralis and T. nativa in all positive muscle samples. Numbers given represent the relative number of muscle larvae in the raccoon dogs.

Mentions: At the termination of the experiment all the infected animals revealed heavy parasite loads. From 13 examined muscles/muscle groups Trichinella larvae were recovered in all 11 skeletal muscles of the infected raccoon dogs, but no larvae were found in the heart and small intestine in any of the animals. The densities of Trichinella positive tissue varied between 71–1091 larvae per gram (lpg) (median 353 lpg) in the T. spiralis and 158–1151 lpg (median 342 lpg) in the T. nativa group (Table 1). The highest larval burdens were found in the front leg muscle, M. flexor carpi ulnaris, for both groups. M. flexor carpi ulnaris was the most heavily infected muscle in every Trichinella positive animal. Also the tongue and eye muscles were good indicators of the infection (Fig. 1). Unexpectedly, Trichinella was also found in 1 control animal at a low density: 0.08 larva/g of muscle in a pooled 300 g digestion sample.


Predilection muscles and physical condition of raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) experimentally infected with Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella nativa.

Mikkonen T, Oivanen L, Näreaho A, Helin H, Sukura A - Acta Vet. Scand. (2001)

Distribution of Trichinella spiralis and T. nativa in all positive muscle samples. Numbers given represent the relative number of muscle larvae in the raccoon dogs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2203223&req=5

Figure 1: Distribution of Trichinella spiralis and T. nativa in all positive muscle samples. Numbers given represent the relative number of muscle larvae in the raccoon dogs.
Mentions: At the termination of the experiment all the infected animals revealed heavy parasite loads. From 13 examined muscles/muscle groups Trichinella larvae were recovered in all 11 skeletal muscles of the infected raccoon dogs, but no larvae were found in the heart and small intestine in any of the animals. The densities of Trichinella positive tissue varied between 71–1091 larvae per gram (lpg) (median 353 lpg) in the T. spiralis and 158–1151 lpg (median 342 lpg) in the T. nativa group (Table 1). The highest larval burdens were found in the front leg muscle, M. flexor carpi ulnaris, for both groups. M. flexor carpi ulnaris was the most heavily infected muscle in every Trichinella positive animal. Also the tongue and eye muscles were good indicators of the infection (Fig. 1). Unexpectedly, Trichinella was also found in 1 control animal at a low density: 0.08 larva/g of muscle in a pooled 300 g digestion sample.

Bottom Line: Larvae were found in all sampled skeleton muscles of the infected animals, but not in the specimens from the heart or intestinal musculature.There were no significant differences in the predilection sites between these 2 parasite species.Thus, Trichinella as a muscle parasite might have catabolic effect on these animals.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. taina.mikkonen@helsinki.fi

ABSTRACT
The predilection muscles of Trichinella spiralis and T. nativa were studied in 2 experimental groups of 6 raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides), the third group serving as a control for clinical signs. The infection dose for both parasites was 1 larva/g body weight. After 12 weeks, the animals were euthanized and 13 sampling sites were analysed by the digestion method. Larvae were found in all sampled skeleton muscles of the infected animals, but not in the specimens from the heart or intestinal musculature. Both parasite species reproduced equally well in the raccoon dog. The median density of infection in positive tissues was 353 larvae per gram (lpg) with T. spiralis and 343 lpg with T. nativa. All the infected animals had the highest larvae numbers in the carpal flexors (M. flexor carpi ulnaris). Also tongue and eye muscles had high infection levels. There were no significant differences in the predilection sites between these 2 parasite species. Trichinellosis increased the relative amount of fat, but not the body weight in the captive raccoon dogs. Thus, Trichinella as a muscle parasite might have catabolic effect on these animals.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus