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Osteoarthrosis of the antebrachiocarpal joint of 7 riding horses.

Magnusson LE, Ekman S - Acta Vet. Scand. (2001)

Bottom Line: The cause of severe OA in these mares is not clear.The fact that OA was bilateral indicates that a single traumatic injury is unlikely as an etiologic factor.It is discussed if the threshold of pain is higher in the antebrachiocarpal joint compared with the middle carpal joint.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Osteoarthrosis (OA) of the antebrachiocarpal joint from 7 riding horses is described. The horses were old mares and developed severe OA, with ankylosis in some of the joints. The lesions were bilateral, and the owners noticed the lameness in a late event. The cause of severe OA in these mares is not clear. The fact that OA was bilateral indicates that a single traumatic injury is unlikely as an etiologic factor. Considering the severe joint lesions it took long time before the horse-owners noticed the lameness. It is discussed if the threshold of pain is higher in the antebrachiocarpal joint compared with the middle carpal joint.

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a, b and c. Horse no. 1. a) Macerated specimen from right carpus, with severe periostal bony proliferations of the radial and accessory carpal bones. A severe bony destruction is also present in the distal palmar region of radius (arrows). b) Macerated specimen of the proximal row of carpal bones (right carpus) with periosteal proliferations of the radial, intermediate, ulnar and accessory bones (the bones are fixed with central nails (see arrow). c) Radiograph of the left carpal bones, post-mortem. The severe bony proliferations are obvious.
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Figure 2: a, b and c. Horse no. 1. a) Macerated specimen from right carpus, with severe periostal bony proliferations of the radial and accessory carpal bones. A severe bony destruction is also present in the distal palmar region of radius (arrows). b) Macerated specimen of the proximal row of carpal bones (right carpus) with periosteal proliferations of the radial, intermediate, ulnar and accessory bones (the bones are fixed with central nails (see arrow). c) Radiograph of the left carpal bones, post-mortem. The severe bony proliferations are obvious.

Mentions: Severe marginal osteophytes were seen in the distal radius, the radial, intermediate, ulnar and accessory carpal bones (Figs. 2a, 2b and 2c). The osteophytes were larger in the medial parts of the joints. The more prominent proliferations were found in the radial carpal bones between the tendons of radial carpal extensor and the oblique carpal extensor muscles and behind the medial collateral ligament. The bone proliferations were extending over the joint cavity creating a fusion in some areas between the distal radius and the radial carpal bones. This ankylosis explained the severe joint stiffness recorded on clinical examination. An area of bone destruction was also evident in the distal palmar regions of radius (Fig. 2a) outlined by the insertions of 2 ligaments connecting the radial carpal bone and distal radius. Subchondral bone sclerosis was present in the radiographed slabs of the distal radius and in the proximal area of the radial carpal bones of horses nos. 1 and 3.


Osteoarthrosis of the antebrachiocarpal joint of 7 riding horses.

Magnusson LE, Ekman S - Acta Vet. Scand. (2001)

a, b and c. Horse no. 1. a) Macerated specimen from right carpus, with severe periostal bony proliferations of the radial and accessory carpal bones. A severe bony destruction is also present in the distal palmar region of radius (arrows). b) Macerated specimen of the proximal row of carpal bones (right carpus) with periosteal proliferations of the radial, intermediate, ulnar and accessory bones (the bones are fixed with central nails (see arrow). c) Radiograph of the left carpal bones, post-mortem. The severe bony proliferations are obvious.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2203221&req=5

Figure 2: a, b and c. Horse no. 1. a) Macerated specimen from right carpus, with severe periostal bony proliferations of the radial and accessory carpal bones. A severe bony destruction is also present in the distal palmar region of radius (arrows). b) Macerated specimen of the proximal row of carpal bones (right carpus) with periosteal proliferations of the radial, intermediate, ulnar and accessory bones (the bones are fixed with central nails (see arrow). c) Radiograph of the left carpal bones, post-mortem. The severe bony proliferations are obvious.
Mentions: Severe marginal osteophytes were seen in the distal radius, the radial, intermediate, ulnar and accessory carpal bones (Figs. 2a, 2b and 2c). The osteophytes were larger in the medial parts of the joints. The more prominent proliferations were found in the radial carpal bones between the tendons of radial carpal extensor and the oblique carpal extensor muscles and behind the medial collateral ligament. The bone proliferations were extending over the joint cavity creating a fusion in some areas between the distal radius and the radial carpal bones. This ankylosis explained the severe joint stiffness recorded on clinical examination. An area of bone destruction was also evident in the distal palmar regions of radius (Fig. 2a) outlined by the insertions of 2 ligaments connecting the radial carpal bone and distal radius. Subchondral bone sclerosis was present in the radiographed slabs of the distal radius and in the proximal area of the radial carpal bones of horses nos. 1 and 3.

Bottom Line: The cause of severe OA in these mares is not clear.The fact that OA was bilateral indicates that a single traumatic injury is unlikely as an etiologic factor.It is discussed if the threshold of pain is higher in the antebrachiocarpal joint compared with the middle carpal joint.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Osteoarthrosis (OA) of the antebrachiocarpal joint from 7 riding horses is described. The horses were old mares and developed severe OA, with ankylosis in some of the joints. The lesions were bilateral, and the owners noticed the lameness in a late event. The cause of severe OA in these mares is not clear. The fact that OA was bilateral indicates that a single traumatic injury is unlikely as an etiologic factor. Considering the severe joint lesions it took long time before the horse-owners noticed the lameness. It is discussed if the threshold of pain is higher in the antebrachiocarpal joint compared with the middle carpal joint.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus