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Biomechanical simulations of the scoliotic deformation process in the pinealectomized chicken: a preliminary study.

Lafortune P, Aubin CE, Boulanger H, Villemure I, Bagnall KM, Moreau A - Scoliosis (2007)

Bottom Line: The experimental data were used to adapt a FEM previously developed to simulate the scoliosis deformation process in human.The simulations of the spine deformation process are compared with the results of an experimental study including a group of pinealectomized chickens.For the vertebral wedging, a good agreement is also observed between the calculated (28 degrees ) and the observed (25 degrees - 30 degrees ) values.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique, University of Montreal, P,O, Box 6079, Station Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3A7, Canada. carl-eric.aubin@polymtl.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: The basic mechanisms whereby mechanical factors modulate the metabolism of the growing spine remain poorly understood, especially the role of growth adaptation in spinal disorders like in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). This paper presents a finite element model (FEM) that was developed to simulate early stages of scoliotic deformities progression using a pinealectomized chicken as animal model.

Methods: The FEM includes basic growth and growth modulation created by the muscle force imbalance. The experimental data were used to adapt a FEM previously developed to simulate the scoliosis deformation process in human. The simulations of the spine deformation process are compared with the results of an experimental study including a group of pinealectomized chickens.

Results: The comparison of the simulation results of the spine deformation process (Cobb angle of 37 degrees ) is in agreement with experimental scoliotic deformities of two representative cases (Cobb angle of 41 degrees and 30 degrees ). For the vertebral wedging, a good agreement is also observed between the calculated (28 degrees ) and the observed (25 degrees - 30 degrees ) values.

Conclusion: The proposed biomechanical model presents a novel approach to realistically simulate the scoliotic deformation process in pinealectomized chickens and investigate different parameters influencing the progression of scoliosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Simulated curves. The Simulated spinal curves (vertebral body centroids), for moments of 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4 and 2 Nmm.
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Figure 5: Simulated curves. The Simulated spinal curves (vertebral body centroids), for moments of 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4 and 2 Nmm.

Mentions: By varying the value of the applied moment, different scoliosis configurations were simulated. The resulting Cobb angle varied between 6° and 37°. The maximal vertebral wedging (range between 5° to 28°) appeared at T4 for moments of 14, 12 and 10 N.mm, and at T5 for the other applied moments. Lateral displacement of the apical vertebrae varied from 1 to 5 mm. The segment of the spine studied had an initial length of 39 mm, while final length was around 53 mm after the application of the moments and growth processes. Table 1 summarizes the scoliotic descriptors for the seven loading cases simulated, and Figure 5 shows the lateral displacements of the vertebral bodies.


Biomechanical simulations of the scoliotic deformation process in the pinealectomized chicken: a preliminary study.

Lafortune P, Aubin CE, Boulanger H, Villemure I, Bagnall KM, Moreau A - Scoliosis (2007)

Simulated curves. The Simulated spinal curves (vertebral body centroids), for moments of 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4 and 2 Nmm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2200637&req=5

Figure 5: Simulated curves. The Simulated spinal curves (vertebral body centroids), for moments of 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4 and 2 Nmm.
Mentions: By varying the value of the applied moment, different scoliosis configurations were simulated. The resulting Cobb angle varied between 6° and 37°. The maximal vertebral wedging (range between 5° to 28°) appeared at T4 for moments of 14, 12 and 10 N.mm, and at T5 for the other applied moments. Lateral displacement of the apical vertebrae varied from 1 to 5 mm. The segment of the spine studied had an initial length of 39 mm, while final length was around 53 mm after the application of the moments and growth processes. Table 1 summarizes the scoliotic descriptors for the seven loading cases simulated, and Figure 5 shows the lateral displacements of the vertebral bodies.

Bottom Line: The experimental data were used to adapt a FEM previously developed to simulate the scoliosis deformation process in human.The simulations of the spine deformation process are compared with the results of an experimental study including a group of pinealectomized chickens.For the vertebral wedging, a good agreement is also observed between the calculated (28 degrees ) and the observed (25 degrees - 30 degrees ) values.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique, University of Montreal, P,O, Box 6079, Station Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3A7, Canada. carl-eric.aubin@polymtl.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: The basic mechanisms whereby mechanical factors modulate the metabolism of the growing spine remain poorly understood, especially the role of growth adaptation in spinal disorders like in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). This paper presents a finite element model (FEM) that was developed to simulate early stages of scoliotic deformities progression using a pinealectomized chicken as animal model.

Methods: The FEM includes basic growth and growth modulation created by the muscle force imbalance. The experimental data were used to adapt a FEM previously developed to simulate the scoliosis deformation process in human. The simulations of the spine deformation process are compared with the results of an experimental study including a group of pinealectomized chickens.

Results: The comparison of the simulation results of the spine deformation process (Cobb angle of 37 degrees ) is in agreement with experimental scoliotic deformities of two representative cases (Cobb angle of 41 degrees and 30 degrees ). For the vertebral wedging, a good agreement is also observed between the calculated (28 degrees ) and the observed (25 degrees - 30 degrees ) values.

Conclusion: The proposed biomechanical model presents a novel approach to realistically simulate the scoliotic deformation process in pinealectomized chickens and investigate different parameters influencing the progression of scoliosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus