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Specific tetraspanin functions.

Hemler ME - J. Cell Biol. (2001)

Bottom Line: Relatively little attention has been given to the large family of abundantly expressed transmembrane proteins known as tetraspanins.Now, the importance of tetraspanins is strongly supported by emerging genetic evidence, coupled with new insights into the biochemistry and functions of tetraspanin protein complexes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

ABSTRACT
Relatively little attention has been given to the large family of abundantly expressed transmembrane proteins known as tetraspanins. Now, the importance of tetraspanins is strongly supported by emerging genetic evidence, coupled with new insights into the biochemistry and functions of tetraspanin protein complexes.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The mammalian tetraspanin family. 27 human and 1 murine protein sequences were clustered using the CLUSTALW program. *Accession number; no other names are available. **Murine sequence. Shaded tetraspanins are those that are mutated in humans, and/or deleted in mice (see text for details).
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fig1: The mammalian tetraspanin family. 27 human and 1 murine protein sequences were clustered using the CLUSTALW program. *Accession number; no other names are available. **Murine sequence. Shaded tetraspanins are those that are mutated in humans, and/or deleted in mice (see text for details).

Mentions: Tetraspanins are abundantly expressed transmembrane proteins (of 25–50 kD), with at least 28 distinct family members in mammals (Fig. 1), 37 members in Drosophila, and 20 in C. elegans (Todres et al., 2000). Although several types of proteins contain four transmembrane domains, they are not members of the tetraspanin family unless they contain many of the conserved residues highlighted in Fig. 2. As seen for another large family of transmembrane proteins, the integrins, several different tetraspanin family members are present on nearly all animal cell and tissue types (except on red blood cells), with individual members often present at reasonably high levels (e.g., 10–100 × 103/cell) (Boucheix and Rubinstein, 2001). However, in contrast to integrins, tetraspanins have received relatively little attention. This may be attributed to a lack of obvious receptor function, a dearth of functional genetic evidence, and a scarcity of key antibody reagents. There is some “generic” evidence showing that tetraspanins associate with each other, and with many other types of proteins to form large transmembrane protein networks, that regulate cell motility, trigger homotypic cell aggregation, and participate in various types of cell fusion and signaling. However, it has been difficult to sort out the detailed roles of individual tetraspanins. Highlighted here are a few important developments involving specific tetraspanins that begin to unravel the mystery of a few of these plentiful, but enigmatic, proteins.


Specific tetraspanin functions.

Hemler ME - J. Cell Biol. (2001)

The mammalian tetraspanin family. 27 human and 1 murine protein sequences were clustered using the CLUSTALW program. *Accession number; no other names are available. **Murine sequence. Shaded tetraspanins are those that are mutated in humans, and/or deleted in mice (see text for details).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2199333&req=5

fig1: The mammalian tetraspanin family. 27 human and 1 murine protein sequences were clustered using the CLUSTALW program. *Accession number; no other names are available. **Murine sequence. Shaded tetraspanins are those that are mutated in humans, and/or deleted in mice (see text for details).
Mentions: Tetraspanins are abundantly expressed transmembrane proteins (of 25–50 kD), with at least 28 distinct family members in mammals (Fig. 1), 37 members in Drosophila, and 20 in C. elegans (Todres et al., 2000). Although several types of proteins contain four transmembrane domains, they are not members of the tetraspanin family unless they contain many of the conserved residues highlighted in Fig. 2. As seen for another large family of transmembrane proteins, the integrins, several different tetraspanin family members are present on nearly all animal cell and tissue types (except on red blood cells), with individual members often present at reasonably high levels (e.g., 10–100 × 103/cell) (Boucheix and Rubinstein, 2001). However, in contrast to integrins, tetraspanins have received relatively little attention. This may be attributed to a lack of obvious receptor function, a dearth of functional genetic evidence, and a scarcity of key antibody reagents. There is some “generic” evidence showing that tetraspanins associate with each other, and with many other types of proteins to form large transmembrane protein networks, that regulate cell motility, trigger homotypic cell aggregation, and participate in various types of cell fusion and signaling. However, it has been difficult to sort out the detailed roles of individual tetraspanins. Highlighted here are a few important developments involving specific tetraspanins that begin to unravel the mystery of a few of these plentiful, but enigmatic, proteins.

Bottom Line: Relatively little attention has been given to the large family of abundantly expressed transmembrane proteins known as tetraspanins.Now, the importance of tetraspanins is strongly supported by emerging genetic evidence, coupled with new insights into the biochemistry and functions of tetraspanin protein complexes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

ABSTRACT
Relatively little attention has been given to the large family of abundantly expressed transmembrane proteins known as tetraspanins. Now, the importance of tetraspanins is strongly supported by emerging genetic evidence, coupled with new insights into the biochemistry and functions of tetraspanin protein complexes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus