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Do bacteria promote asthma?

Potera C - Environ. Health Perspect. (2008)

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Newborns whose lungs become colonized with certain bacteria are more likely to develop wheezing and childhood asthma than babies not colonized by the bacteria... This connection, reported in the 11 October 2007 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, raises the possibility that controlling bacterial colonization in neonates may lower the prevalence of childhood asthma... Pediatrician Hans Bisgaard, director of the Danish Pediatric Asthma Center at Copenhagen University Hospital, and colleagues studied 321 asthmatic mothers and their infants for five years. “By including mothers with asthma, we identified a high-risk cohort where we expect to see more children with asthma,” says Bisgaard... A family history of asthma raises the risk for childhood asthma... At 1 month and 12 months of age, the babies were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Staphylococcus aureus... The first three pathogens cause pneumonia, whereas S. aureus commonly infects the skin... Parents recorded the children’s respiratory symptoms, such as wheezing and persistent cough, in daily diaries... Physicians examined the children for asthma when they reached 5 years of age... One-fifth of newborns were colonized with S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, or some combination thereof, and the presence of 1 or more of these microbes was associated with a 2.4 times greater risk of persistent wheeze and a 3.85 times greater risk of hospitalization for wheezing... Bisgaard plans to treat a future group of pregnant women and neonates with probiotics (potentially beneficial bacteria) to assess whether such therapy prevents childhood asthma. “The study raises good questions about immune imbalance associated with asthma,” says Stanley Szefler, head of pediatric clinical pharmacology at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver.

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Do bacteria promote asthma?

Potera C - Environ. Health Perspect. (2008)

© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2199276&req=5

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Newborns whose lungs become colonized with certain bacteria are more likely to develop wheezing and childhood asthma than babies not colonized by the bacteria... This connection, reported in the 11 October 2007 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, raises the possibility that controlling bacterial colonization in neonates may lower the prevalence of childhood asthma... Pediatrician Hans Bisgaard, director of the Danish Pediatric Asthma Center at Copenhagen University Hospital, and colleagues studied 321 asthmatic mothers and their infants for five years. “By including mothers with asthma, we identified a high-risk cohort where we expect to see more children with asthma,” says Bisgaard... A family history of asthma raises the risk for childhood asthma... At 1 month and 12 months of age, the babies were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Staphylococcus aureus... The first three pathogens cause pneumonia, whereas S. aureus commonly infects the skin... Parents recorded the children’s respiratory symptoms, such as wheezing and persistent cough, in daily diaries... Physicians examined the children for asthma when they reached 5 years of age... One-fifth of newborns were colonized with S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, or some combination thereof, and the presence of 1 or more of these microbes was associated with a 2.4 times greater risk of persistent wheeze and a 3.85 times greater risk of hospitalization for wheezing... Bisgaard plans to treat a future group of pregnant women and neonates with probiotics (potentially beneficial bacteria) to assess whether such therapy prevents childhood asthma. “The study raises good questions about immune imbalance associated with asthma,” says Stanley Szefler, head of pediatric clinical pharmacology at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver.

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