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Simple centromere, complex kinetochore: linking spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA in budding yeast.

Cheeseman IM, Drubin DG, Barnes G - J. Cell Biol. (2002)

Bottom Line: Although the budding yeast centromere is extremely short (125 bp) compared to those of other eukaryotes, the kinetochore that assembles on this DNA displays a rich molecular complexity.Here, we describe recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore function in budding yeast and present a model describing the attachment that is formed between spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA.This analysis may provide general principles for kinetochore function and regulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202, USA.

ABSTRACT
Although the budding yeast centromere is extremely short (125 bp) compared to those of other eukaryotes, the kinetochore that assembles on this DNA displays a rich molecular complexity. Here, we describe recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore function in budding yeast and present a model describing the attachment that is formed between spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA. This analysis may provide general principles for kinetochore function and regulation.

Show MeSH
Schematic diagram of the kinetochore. This model is based on the organization of the DNA-binding proteins (Espelin et al., 1997; Meluh and Koshland, 1997; Meluh et al., 1998) and the known physical interactions of the different kinetochore proteins (Cheeseman et al., 2001a).
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fig2: Schematic diagram of the kinetochore. This model is based on the organization of the DNA-binding proteins (Espelin et al., 1997; Meluh and Koshland, 1997; Meluh et al., 1998) and the known physical interactions of the different kinetochore proteins (Cheeseman et al., 2001a).

Mentions: Nonmotor microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs)* also appear to play roles in mediating kinetochore–spindle attachments. The first kinetochore-associated MAP to be identified was Dam1p, a component of the Dam1p complex (Dam1p, Duo1p, Dad1p, Spc19p, Spc34p, Dad2p, Ask1p, Dad3p, and Dad4p [Cheeseman et al., 2001a; Janke et al., 2002; Li et al., 2002; unpublished data]). This complex localizes to kinetochores in an Ndc10- and Ndc80-dependent manner (Enquist-Newman et al., 2001; Jones et al., 2001; Janke et al., 2002) and is essential for chromosome segregation. Phenotypic analyses of dam1 mutants showed that their spindles have monopolar attachments to paired sister chromatids (Cheeseman et al., 2001b; He et al., 2001), possibly reflecting an inability to form new kinetochore–microtubule attachments or a role in chromosome biorientation (Janke et al., 2002). The Dam1p complex interacts physically with central kinetochore proteins of both the Ctf3 and Ndc80 complexes (Fig. 2) (Cheeseman et al., 2001a; Measday et al., 2002).


Simple centromere, complex kinetochore: linking spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA in budding yeast.

Cheeseman IM, Drubin DG, Barnes G - J. Cell Biol. (2002)

Schematic diagram of the kinetochore. This model is based on the organization of the DNA-binding proteins (Espelin et al., 1997; Meluh and Koshland, 1997; Meluh et al., 1998) and the known physical interactions of the different kinetochore proteins (Cheeseman et al., 2001a).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2199245&req=5

fig2: Schematic diagram of the kinetochore. This model is based on the organization of the DNA-binding proteins (Espelin et al., 1997; Meluh and Koshland, 1997; Meluh et al., 1998) and the known physical interactions of the different kinetochore proteins (Cheeseman et al., 2001a).
Mentions: Nonmotor microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs)* also appear to play roles in mediating kinetochore–spindle attachments. The first kinetochore-associated MAP to be identified was Dam1p, a component of the Dam1p complex (Dam1p, Duo1p, Dad1p, Spc19p, Spc34p, Dad2p, Ask1p, Dad3p, and Dad4p [Cheeseman et al., 2001a; Janke et al., 2002; Li et al., 2002; unpublished data]). This complex localizes to kinetochores in an Ndc10- and Ndc80-dependent manner (Enquist-Newman et al., 2001; Jones et al., 2001; Janke et al., 2002) and is essential for chromosome segregation. Phenotypic analyses of dam1 mutants showed that their spindles have monopolar attachments to paired sister chromatids (Cheeseman et al., 2001b; He et al., 2001), possibly reflecting an inability to form new kinetochore–microtubule attachments or a role in chromosome biorientation (Janke et al., 2002). The Dam1p complex interacts physically with central kinetochore proteins of both the Ctf3 and Ndc80 complexes (Fig. 2) (Cheeseman et al., 2001a; Measday et al., 2002).

Bottom Line: Although the budding yeast centromere is extremely short (125 bp) compared to those of other eukaryotes, the kinetochore that assembles on this DNA displays a rich molecular complexity.Here, we describe recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore function in budding yeast and present a model describing the attachment that is formed between spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA.This analysis may provide general principles for kinetochore function and regulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202, USA.

ABSTRACT
Although the budding yeast centromere is extremely short (125 bp) compared to those of other eukaryotes, the kinetochore that assembles on this DNA displays a rich molecular complexity. Here, we describe recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore function in budding yeast and present a model describing the attachment that is formed between spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA. This analysis may provide general principles for kinetochore function and regulation.

Show MeSH