Limits...
Simple centromere, complex kinetochore: linking spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA in budding yeast.

Cheeseman IM, Drubin DG, Barnes G - J. Cell Biol. (2002)

Bottom Line: Although the budding yeast centromere is extremely short (125 bp) compared to those of other eukaryotes, the kinetochore that assembles on this DNA displays a rich molecular complexity.Here, we describe recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore function in budding yeast and present a model describing the attachment that is formed between spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA.This analysis may provide general principles for kinetochore function and regulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202, USA.

ABSTRACT
Although the budding yeast centromere is extremely short (125 bp) compared to those of other eukaryotes, the kinetochore that assembles on this DNA displays a rich molecular complexity. Here, we describe recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore function in budding yeast and present a model describing the attachment that is formed between spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA. This analysis may provide general principles for kinetochore function and regulation.

Show MeSH
Budding yeast kinetochore proteins and their homologues. Classification of budding yeast kinetochore proteins based on their function and interactions within the kinetochore. Essential genes are shown in red, and nonessential genes are shown in black. When applicable, the metazoan homologue of each protein is listed. For proteins with no identifiable metazoan homologue, the S. pombe homologue is listed in blue. In cases where kinetochore function has not been definitively established, that protein is indicated with a question mark.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2199245&req=5

fig1: Budding yeast kinetochore proteins and their homologues. Classification of budding yeast kinetochore proteins based on their function and interactions within the kinetochore. Essential genes are shown in red, and nonessential genes are shown in black. When applicable, the metazoan homologue of each protein is listed. For proteins with no identifiable metazoan homologue, the S. pombe homologue is listed in blue. In cases where kinetochore function has not been definitively established, that protein is indicated with a question mark.

Mentions: Chromosome segregation during mitosis requires a physical connection between spindle microtubules and chromosomes. This attachment occurs at proteinaceous structures called kinetochores that assemble on centromeric DNA. Studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been particularly revealing for understanding kinetochore function. Recently, the development of sensitive assays for detecting kinetochore association has allowed the identification of >30 yeast kinetochore proteins, many of which are conserved among eukaryotes (Fig. 1). In this review, we discuss the current molecular understanding of how the budding yeast kinetochore assembles on centromeric DNA, the nature of the higher order kinetochore structure, the mechanism by which the kinetochore attaches to spindle microtubules, and how this kinetochore–microtubule attachment is regulated.


Simple centromere, complex kinetochore: linking spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA in budding yeast.

Cheeseman IM, Drubin DG, Barnes G - J. Cell Biol. (2002)

Budding yeast kinetochore proteins and their homologues. Classification of budding yeast kinetochore proteins based on their function and interactions within the kinetochore. Essential genes are shown in red, and nonessential genes are shown in black. When applicable, the metazoan homologue of each protein is listed. For proteins with no identifiable metazoan homologue, the S. pombe homologue is listed in blue. In cases where kinetochore function has not been definitively established, that protein is indicated with a question mark.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2199245&req=5

fig1: Budding yeast kinetochore proteins and their homologues. Classification of budding yeast kinetochore proteins based on their function and interactions within the kinetochore. Essential genes are shown in red, and nonessential genes are shown in black. When applicable, the metazoan homologue of each protein is listed. For proteins with no identifiable metazoan homologue, the S. pombe homologue is listed in blue. In cases where kinetochore function has not been definitively established, that protein is indicated with a question mark.
Mentions: Chromosome segregation during mitosis requires a physical connection between spindle microtubules and chromosomes. This attachment occurs at proteinaceous structures called kinetochores that assemble on centromeric DNA. Studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been particularly revealing for understanding kinetochore function. Recently, the development of sensitive assays for detecting kinetochore association has allowed the identification of >30 yeast kinetochore proteins, many of which are conserved among eukaryotes (Fig. 1). In this review, we discuss the current molecular understanding of how the budding yeast kinetochore assembles on centromeric DNA, the nature of the higher order kinetochore structure, the mechanism by which the kinetochore attaches to spindle microtubules, and how this kinetochore–microtubule attachment is regulated.

Bottom Line: Although the budding yeast centromere is extremely short (125 bp) compared to those of other eukaryotes, the kinetochore that assembles on this DNA displays a rich molecular complexity.Here, we describe recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore function in budding yeast and present a model describing the attachment that is formed between spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA.This analysis may provide general principles for kinetochore function and regulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202, USA.

ABSTRACT
Although the budding yeast centromere is extremely short (125 bp) compared to those of other eukaryotes, the kinetochore that assembles on this DNA displays a rich molecular complexity. Here, we describe recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore function in budding yeast and present a model describing the attachment that is formed between spindle microtubules and centromeric DNA. This analysis may provide general principles for kinetochore function and regulation.

Show MeSH