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Neutrophil emigration in the skin, lungs, and peritoneum: different requirements for CD11/CD18 revealed by CD18-deficient mice.

Mizgerd JP, Kubo H, Kutkoski GJ, Bhagwan SD, Scharffetter-Kochanek K, Beaudet AL, Doerschuk CM - J. Exp. Med. (1997)

Bottom Line: These data are consistent with expectations based on studies using blocking antibodies to inhibit CD11/CD18 complexes, and on observations of humans lacking CD11/CD18 complexes.The number of emigrated neutrophils in lung sections during Escherichia coli pneumonia, or in peritoneal lavage fluid after 4 h of S. pneumoniae peritonitis, was not reduced in CD18-/- mutants, but rather was greater than the WT values (240 +/- 30 and 220 +/- 30% WT, respectively).These data contrast with expectations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physiology Program, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

ABSTRACT
To determine the role of CD11/CD18 complexes in neutrophil emigration, inflammation was induced in the skin, lungs, or peritoneum of mutant mice deficient in CD18 (CD18-/- mutants). Peripheral blood of CD18-/- mutants contained 11-fold more neutrophils than did blood of wild-type (WT) mice. During irritant dermatitis induced by topical application of croton oil, the number of emigrated neutrophils in histological sections of dermis was 98% less in CD18-/- mutants than in WT mice. During Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia, neutrophil emigration in CD18-/- mutants was not reduced. These data are consistent with expectations based on studies using blocking antibodies to inhibit CD11/CD18 complexes, and on observations of humans lacking CD11/CD18 complexes. The number of emigrated neutrophils in lung sections during Escherichia coli pneumonia, or in peritoneal lavage fluid after 4 h of S. pneumoniae peritonitis, was not reduced in CD18-/- mutants, but rather was greater than the WT values (240 +/- 30 and 220 +/- 30% WT, respectively). Also, there was no inhibition of neutrophil emigration during sterile peritonitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate (90 +/- 20% WT). These data contrast with expectations. Whereas CD11/CD18 complexes are essential to the dermal emigration of neutrophils during acute dermatitis, CD18-/- mutant mice demonstrate surprising alternative pathways for neutrophil emigration during pneumonia or peritonitis.

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Peritoneal neutrophil emigration in WT and CD18−/− mice  0, 4, or 24 h after intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate. Emigrated  neutrophils were quantitated in peritoneal lavage fluids and expressed as  mean ± SEM neutrophils/lavage for WT (closed bars) or CD18−/− (open  bars) mice. The data from 0 h of peritonitis (no thioglycollate) are the  same as shown in Fig. 5. *Significant differences from WT; ‡significant  differences from 0-h (uninfected) mice (P <0.05).
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Figure 6: Peritoneal neutrophil emigration in WT and CD18−/− mice 0, 4, or 24 h after intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate. Emigrated neutrophils were quantitated in peritoneal lavage fluids and expressed as mean ± SEM neutrophils/lavage for WT (closed bars) or CD18−/− (open bars) mice. The data from 0 h of peritonitis (no thioglycollate) are the same as shown in Fig. 5. *Significant differences from WT; ‡significant differences from 0-h (uninfected) mice (P <0.05).

Mentions: There were few neutrophils in the uninfected peritoneal cavities of WT and CD18−/− mice (Fig. 5). After intraperitoneal injection of S. pneumoniae, neutrophil accumulation was apparent 4 h later, and was greatly increased after 24 h of peritonitis in both WT and CD18−/− mutant mice (Fig. 5). More neutrophils were recovered in the peritoneal lavage fluids of CD18−/− mutants than of WT mice after 4 or 24 h of peritonitis (220 ± 30 and 500 ± 50% WT, respectively; Fig. 5). After intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate, there was no significant difference between CD18−/− mutants and WT mice in the number of neutrophils recovered by peritoneal lavage after 4 h (110 ± 30% WT; Fig. 6). By 24 h, more neutrophils were recovered from CD18−/− mutants than from WT mice (360 ± 80% WT; Fig. 6).


Neutrophil emigration in the skin, lungs, and peritoneum: different requirements for CD11/CD18 revealed by CD18-deficient mice.

Mizgerd JP, Kubo H, Kutkoski GJ, Bhagwan SD, Scharffetter-Kochanek K, Beaudet AL, Doerschuk CM - J. Exp. Med. (1997)

Peritoneal neutrophil emigration in WT and CD18−/− mice  0, 4, or 24 h after intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate. Emigrated  neutrophils were quantitated in peritoneal lavage fluids and expressed as  mean ± SEM neutrophils/lavage for WT (closed bars) or CD18−/− (open  bars) mice. The data from 0 h of peritonitis (no thioglycollate) are the  same as shown in Fig. 5. *Significant differences from WT; ‡significant  differences from 0-h (uninfected) mice (P <0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2199087&req=5

Figure 6: Peritoneal neutrophil emigration in WT and CD18−/− mice 0, 4, or 24 h after intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate. Emigrated neutrophils were quantitated in peritoneal lavage fluids and expressed as mean ± SEM neutrophils/lavage for WT (closed bars) or CD18−/− (open bars) mice. The data from 0 h of peritonitis (no thioglycollate) are the same as shown in Fig. 5. *Significant differences from WT; ‡significant differences from 0-h (uninfected) mice (P <0.05).
Mentions: There were few neutrophils in the uninfected peritoneal cavities of WT and CD18−/− mice (Fig. 5). After intraperitoneal injection of S. pneumoniae, neutrophil accumulation was apparent 4 h later, and was greatly increased after 24 h of peritonitis in both WT and CD18−/− mutant mice (Fig. 5). More neutrophils were recovered in the peritoneal lavage fluids of CD18−/− mutants than of WT mice after 4 or 24 h of peritonitis (220 ± 30 and 500 ± 50% WT, respectively; Fig. 5). After intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate, there was no significant difference between CD18−/− mutants and WT mice in the number of neutrophils recovered by peritoneal lavage after 4 h (110 ± 30% WT; Fig. 6). By 24 h, more neutrophils were recovered from CD18−/− mutants than from WT mice (360 ± 80% WT; Fig. 6).

Bottom Line: These data are consistent with expectations based on studies using blocking antibodies to inhibit CD11/CD18 complexes, and on observations of humans lacking CD11/CD18 complexes.The number of emigrated neutrophils in lung sections during Escherichia coli pneumonia, or in peritoneal lavage fluid after 4 h of S. pneumoniae peritonitis, was not reduced in CD18-/- mutants, but rather was greater than the WT values (240 +/- 30 and 220 +/- 30% WT, respectively).These data contrast with expectations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physiology Program, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

ABSTRACT
To determine the role of CD11/CD18 complexes in neutrophil emigration, inflammation was induced in the skin, lungs, or peritoneum of mutant mice deficient in CD18 (CD18-/- mutants). Peripheral blood of CD18-/- mutants contained 11-fold more neutrophils than did blood of wild-type (WT) mice. During irritant dermatitis induced by topical application of croton oil, the number of emigrated neutrophils in histological sections of dermis was 98% less in CD18-/- mutants than in WT mice. During Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia, neutrophil emigration in CD18-/- mutants was not reduced. These data are consistent with expectations based on studies using blocking antibodies to inhibit CD11/CD18 complexes, and on observations of humans lacking CD11/CD18 complexes. The number of emigrated neutrophils in lung sections during Escherichia coli pneumonia, or in peritoneal lavage fluid after 4 h of S. pneumoniae peritonitis, was not reduced in CD18-/- mutants, but rather was greater than the WT values (240 +/- 30 and 220 +/- 30% WT, respectively). Also, there was no inhibition of neutrophil emigration during sterile peritonitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate (90 +/- 20% WT). These data contrast with expectations. Whereas CD11/CD18 complexes are essential to the dermal emigration of neutrophils during acute dermatitis, CD18-/- mutant mice demonstrate surprising alternative pathways for neutrophil emigration during pneumonia or peritonitis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus