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The concept of self-organization in cellular architecture.

Misteli T - J. Cell Biol. (2001)

Bottom Line: In vivo microscopy has recently revealed the dynamic nature of many cellular organelles.The dynamic properties of several cellular structures are consistent with a role for self-organization in their formation, maintenance, and function; therefore, self-organization might be a general principle in cellular organization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. mistelit@mail.nih.gov

ABSTRACT
In vivo microscopy has recently revealed the dynamic nature of many cellular organelles. The dynamic properties of several cellular structures are consistent with a role for self-organization in their formation, maintenance, and function; therefore, self-organization might be a general principle in cellular organization.

Show MeSH
Self-assembly versus self-organization. In self-assembly, a set of components assembles into a stable, static structure that reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium. In self-organization, a set of components assembles into a steady-state, dynamic structure.
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fig1: Self-assembly versus self-organization. In self-assembly, a set of components assembles into a stable, static structure that reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium. In self-organization, a set of components assembles into a steady-state, dynamic structure.

Mentions: Two fundamentally different mechanisms exist to generate macromolecular structures: self-assembly and self-organization. Whereas self-assembly involves the physical association of molecules into an equilibrium structure (Kushner, 1969), self-organization involves the physical interaction of molecules in a steady-state structure (Fig. 1) (Nicolis and Prigogine, 1977). For example, virus and phage proteins self-assemble to true equilibrium and form stable, static structures. In contrast, most cellular structures (i.e., the cytoskeleton, nuclear subcompartments, or exocytic and endocytic compartments) are open for exchange of energy and matter and are governed by steady-state dynamics.


The concept of self-organization in cellular architecture.

Misteli T - J. Cell Biol. (2001)

Self-assembly versus self-organization. In self-assembly, a set of components assembles into a stable, static structure that reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium. In self-organization, a set of components assembles into a steady-state, dynamic structure.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2198832&req=5

fig1: Self-assembly versus self-organization. In self-assembly, a set of components assembles into a stable, static structure that reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium. In self-organization, a set of components assembles into a steady-state, dynamic structure.
Mentions: Two fundamentally different mechanisms exist to generate macromolecular structures: self-assembly and self-organization. Whereas self-assembly involves the physical association of molecules into an equilibrium structure (Kushner, 1969), self-organization involves the physical interaction of molecules in a steady-state structure (Fig. 1) (Nicolis and Prigogine, 1977). For example, virus and phage proteins self-assemble to true equilibrium and form stable, static structures. In contrast, most cellular structures (i.e., the cytoskeleton, nuclear subcompartments, or exocytic and endocytic compartments) are open for exchange of energy and matter and are governed by steady-state dynamics.

Bottom Line: In vivo microscopy has recently revealed the dynamic nature of many cellular organelles.The dynamic properties of several cellular structures are consistent with a role for self-organization in their formation, maintenance, and function; therefore, self-organization might be a general principle in cellular organization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. mistelit@mail.nih.gov

ABSTRACT
In vivo microscopy has recently revealed the dynamic nature of many cellular organelles. The dynamic properties of several cellular structures are consistent with a role for self-organization in their formation, maintenance, and function; therefore, self-organization might be a general principle in cellular organization.

Show MeSH