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The involvement of interleukin (IL)-15 in regulating the differentiation of granulated metrial gland cells in mouse pregnant uterus.

Ye W, Zheng LM, Young JD, Liu CC - J. Exp. Med. (1996)

Bottom Line: Recently, IL-15, a novel cytokine, which displays biological activities similar to IL-2, has also been shown to be capable of activating NK cells.Moreover, IL-15, though not IL-2, is capable of inducing the expression of perforin and granzymes in pregnant uterine tissues explanted in vitro.Data obtained from in situ hybridization study have suggested that the macrophages present in the pregnant uterus may be responsible for the production of IL-15.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology, Rockefeller University, New York 10021, USA.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have suggested that granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells are bone marrow-derived lymphoid cells, which differentiate in situ in the mouse pregnant uterus into natural killer (NK)-like cells. Similar to NK cells, GMG cells express an abundant level of cytolytic mediators such as perforin. The factor(s) regulating the differentiation of GMG cells remain(s) to be identified, although cytokines previously implicated in the stimulation/activation of NK cells (e.g., IL-2, IL-6, IL-7, and IL-12) can be considered as potential candidates. Recently, IL-15, a novel cytokine, which displays biological activities similar to IL-2, has also been shown to be capable of activating NK cells. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, we have demonstrated in the present study that IL-15 and its cognate receptor, but not the other cytokines, are expressed in the mouse pregnant uterus, with a time course concomitant with those of cytolytic mediators in differentiated GMG cells. Moreover, IL-15, though not IL-2, is capable of inducing the expression of perforin and granzymes in pregnant uterine tissues explanted in vitro. Data obtained from in situ hybridization study have suggested that the macrophages present in the pregnant uterus may be responsible for the production of IL-15. These results suggest that IL-15 is involved in regulating the differentiation of GMG cells during mouse pregnancy.

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Expression of IL-15 in the pregnant uterus analyzed by in situ hybridization.  Sections of an implantation site in a pregnant  uterus of day 9 of gestation were hybridized  with dioxygenin-labeled antisense (A and C) or  sense (B and D) riboprobe specific for murine  IL-15. Some cells residing in the decidua basalis  (DB) (arrows) appeared to hybridize specifically  with the antisense probe, indicating the expression of IL-15 mRNA in these cells.
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Figure 4: Expression of IL-15 in the pregnant uterus analyzed by in situ hybridization. Sections of an implantation site in a pregnant uterus of day 9 of gestation were hybridized with dioxygenin-labeled antisense (A and C) or sense (B and D) riboprobe specific for murine IL-15. Some cells residing in the decidua basalis (DB) (arrows) appeared to hybridize specifically with the antisense probe, indicating the expression of IL-15 mRNA in these cells.

Mentions: Another question pertinent to the biological function of IL-15 during pregnancy is the following: which cell population present in the pregnant uterus is responsible for the production of this cytokine? Since both macrophages and fibroblasts, two cell types known to produce IL-15, have been shown to be present in large numbers in the pregnant uterine tissue, they may be responsible for producing IL-15 in the local environment. Other cells, such as uterine epithelial cells and trophoblasts, as well as GMG cells themselves, have also been reported to be capable of secreting cytokines (18–20). The possibility that these cells may also contribute to the production of IL-15 in the pregnant uterus therefore can not be excluded. To address this issue, we examined the sections of the utero–placental units by in situ hybridization using riboprobes specific for IL-15. The results showed that some cells residing in the decidua basalis could hybridize to the antisense probe for IL-15 (Fig. 4). According to their anatomical localization, these IL-15expressing cells appeared to be macrophages, but not GMG cells. Moreover, cells expressing IL-15 messages were not detected in the labrynthine placenta, excluding the possibility that trophoblasts may be an important source of IL-15 (data not shown). Studies aimed at elucidating more precisely the identity of the IL-15-expressing cells (e.g., immunohistocytochemical staining using antibodies specific for macrophage surface markers) are underway.


The involvement of interleukin (IL)-15 in regulating the differentiation of granulated metrial gland cells in mouse pregnant uterus.

Ye W, Zheng LM, Young JD, Liu CC - J. Exp. Med. (1996)

Expression of IL-15 in the pregnant uterus analyzed by in situ hybridization.  Sections of an implantation site in a pregnant  uterus of day 9 of gestation were hybridized  with dioxygenin-labeled antisense (A and C) or  sense (B and D) riboprobe specific for murine  IL-15. Some cells residing in the decidua basalis  (DB) (arrows) appeared to hybridize specifically  with the antisense probe, indicating the expression of IL-15 mRNA in these cells.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2196382&req=5

Figure 4: Expression of IL-15 in the pregnant uterus analyzed by in situ hybridization. Sections of an implantation site in a pregnant uterus of day 9 of gestation were hybridized with dioxygenin-labeled antisense (A and C) or sense (B and D) riboprobe specific for murine IL-15. Some cells residing in the decidua basalis (DB) (arrows) appeared to hybridize specifically with the antisense probe, indicating the expression of IL-15 mRNA in these cells.
Mentions: Another question pertinent to the biological function of IL-15 during pregnancy is the following: which cell population present in the pregnant uterus is responsible for the production of this cytokine? Since both macrophages and fibroblasts, two cell types known to produce IL-15, have been shown to be present in large numbers in the pregnant uterine tissue, they may be responsible for producing IL-15 in the local environment. Other cells, such as uterine epithelial cells and trophoblasts, as well as GMG cells themselves, have also been reported to be capable of secreting cytokines (18–20). The possibility that these cells may also contribute to the production of IL-15 in the pregnant uterus therefore can not be excluded. To address this issue, we examined the sections of the utero–placental units by in situ hybridization using riboprobes specific for IL-15. The results showed that some cells residing in the decidua basalis could hybridize to the antisense probe for IL-15 (Fig. 4). According to their anatomical localization, these IL-15expressing cells appeared to be macrophages, but not GMG cells. Moreover, cells expressing IL-15 messages were not detected in the labrynthine placenta, excluding the possibility that trophoblasts may be an important source of IL-15 (data not shown). Studies aimed at elucidating more precisely the identity of the IL-15-expressing cells (e.g., immunohistocytochemical staining using antibodies specific for macrophage surface markers) are underway.

Bottom Line: Recently, IL-15, a novel cytokine, which displays biological activities similar to IL-2, has also been shown to be capable of activating NK cells.Moreover, IL-15, though not IL-2, is capable of inducing the expression of perforin and granzymes in pregnant uterine tissues explanted in vitro.Data obtained from in situ hybridization study have suggested that the macrophages present in the pregnant uterus may be responsible for the production of IL-15.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology, Rockefeller University, New York 10021, USA.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies have suggested that granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells are bone marrow-derived lymphoid cells, which differentiate in situ in the mouse pregnant uterus into natural killer (NK)-like cells. Similar to NK cells, GMG cells express an abundant level of cytolytic mediators such as perforin. The factor(s) regulating the differentiation of GMG cells remain(s) to be identified, although cytokines previously implicated in the stimulation/activation of NK cells (e.g., IL-2, IL-6, IL-7, and IL-12) can be considered as potential candidates. Recently, IL-15, a novel cytokine, which displays biological activities similar to IL-2, has also been shown to be capable of activating NK cells. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, we have demonstrated in the present study that IL-15 and its cognate receptor, but not the other cytokines, are expressed in the mouse pregnant uterus, with a time course concomitant with those of cytolytic mediators in differentiated GMG cells. Moreover, IL-15, though not IL-2, is capable of inducing the expression of perforin and granzymes in pregnant uterine tissues explanted in vitro. Data obtained from in situ hybridization study have suggested that the macrophages present in the pregnant uterus may be responsible for the production of IL-15. These results suggest that IL-15 is involved in regulating the differentiation of GMG cells during mouse pregnancy.

Show MeSH